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Eddie Martin Terminal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994 | TOM RAGAN
Sparks flew in the early Monday morning fog when a demolition crew started to tear down the Eddie Martin Terminal at John Wayne Airport. Dedicated by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan in May, 1967, the Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal was named after the die-hard pilot who established an airfield in the area in the early 1920s. In those days, Martin was conducting business on a dirt runway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994 | TOM RAGAN
Sparks flew in the early Monday morning fog when a demolition crew started to tear down the Eddie Martin Terminal at John Wayne Airport. Dedicated by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan in May, 1967, the Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal was named after the die-hard pilot who established an airfield in the area in the early 1920s. In those days, Martin was conducting business on a dirt runway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1994
I'm afraid the item "Eddie Who?" (Newswatch, Aug. 29) may have left the wrong impression with many of your readers about the dedication of those of us at Martin Aviation to the memory of our founder, the late Eddie Martin. No one, no group, and certainly no organization will be sadder to see the coming demise of the old Eddie Martin Terminal building than we. But we also recognize that the building is simply not capable of being restored for any kind of public use. Nor has there ever been any particular joy at Martin Aviation over the name change of Orange County Airport itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1990
In 1974 Supervisor Thomas F. Riley was appointed to the Orange County Board of Supervisors for the 5th District, which happens to have an airport within its boundaries. Since his first day on the job, Riley has been deeply involved in both making the airport a good neighbor and meeting the vital needs of air transportation. Supervisor Riley's leadership made the settlement agreement with the city of Newport a reality. This action permitted the current needed improvements at the airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1990
I would like to ask your help in persuading the Board of Supervisors to realize the importance of naming the new airport terminal after Eddie Martin. Martin, 88, is a pioneer aviator who started Orange County Airport in 1922. He is still living in Santa Ana today. His pilot's license is signed by Wilbur Wright. I do not need to go into all of the accomplishments of Martin, as they are a matter or record. There are many of us who would like to see the new terminal building at the airport named the Eddie Martin Terminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1994
I'm afraid the item "Eddie Who?" (Newswatch, Aug. 29) may have left the wrong impression with many of your readers about the dedication of those of us at Martin Aviation to the memory of our founder, the late Eddie Martin. No one, no group, and certainly no organization will be sadder to see the coming demise of the old Eddie Martin Terminal building than we. But we also recognize that the building is simply not capable of being restored for any kind of public use. Nor has there ever been any particular joy at Martin Aviation over the name change of Orange County Airport itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1990
Among the officials appearing before photographers at the new Thomas F. Riley Terminal recently was County Supervisor Thomas F. Riley. Supervisor Riley played a lead role in the expansion of what was Orange County Airport, in renaming it to John Wayne Airport and in blocking any consideration of commercial use of the Marine Corps El Toro base. Although John Wayne made no noticeable contribution to Orange County or Newport Beach, the city of his residence, possibly he contributed to Supervisor Riley, leading to the supervisor's veneration for the "Duke."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
The venerable short-term parking lot at John Wayne Airport, which has provided 22 years of easy, walking-distance access to the passenger terminal, is closing. Airport officials announced Wednesday that the $15-per-day lot, directly in front of Eddie Martin Terminal, will be unavailable for public parking beginning Friday to make way for a new airport entrance road and space for rental cars. Although the closure will eliminate 800 public parking spaces, airport officials said there will be little or no adverse impact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
After three years of study, John Wayne Airport officials are recommending that the old Edward J. (Eddie) Martin passenger terminal be razed and that a new general aviation terminal be built at another site to serve the crews and other people using charter and private aircraft. The announcement of plans to demolish the old terminal, named for one of the nation's aviation pioneers, has long been expected, since the badly decaying building has been vacant since Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1990
Among the officials appearing before photographers at the new Thomas F. Riley Terminal recently was County Supervisor Thomas F. Riley. Supervisor Riley played a lead role in the expansion of what was Orange County Airport, in renaming it to John Wayne Airport and in blocking any consideration of commercial use of the Marine Corps El Toro base. Although John Wayne made no noticeable contribution to Orange County or Newport Beach, the city of his residence, possibly he contributed to Supervisor Riley, leading to the supervisor's veneration for the "Duke."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1990
In 1974 Supervisor Thomas F. Riley was appointed to the Orange County Board of Supervisors for the 5th District, which happens to have an airport within its boundaries. Since his first day on the job, Riley has been deeply involved in both making the airport a good neighbor and meeting the vital needs of air transportation. Supervisor Riley's leadership made the settlement agreement with the city of Newport a reality. This action permitted the current needed improvements at the airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1990
I would like to ask your help in persuading the Board of Supervisors to realize the importance of naming the new airport terminal after Eddie Martin. Martin, 88, is a pioneer aviator who started Orange County Airport in 1922. He is still living in Santa Ana today. His pilot's license is signed by Wilbur Wright. I do not need to go into all of the accomplishments of Martin, as they are a matter or record. There are many of us who would like to see the new terminal building at the airport named the Eddie Martin Terminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
The venerable short-term parking lot at John Wayne Airport, which has provided 22 years of easy, walking-distance access to the passenger terminal, is closing. Airport officials announced Wednesday that the $15-per-day lot, directly in front of Eddie Martin Terminal, will be unavailable for public parking beginning Friday to make way for a new airport entrance road and space for rental cars. Although the closure will eliminate 800 public parking spaces, airport officials said there will be little or no adverse impact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal that could map a new course for general aviation at John Wayne Airport and result in the demolition of the old Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal was approved by the Airport Commission on Wednesday night. The plan was recommended to the Orange County Board of Supervisors on a voice vote, despite concerns about the level of services afforded to the owners and operators of private planes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Dandelions poke through the cracked sidewalk outside the abandoned, graying Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal at John Wayne Airport. The main concourse that once teemed with passengers is now a darkened shell. A single office chair sits empty. An exposed electrical conduit pops out of the ground where ticket agents' computers once hummed. A nameplate embossed with "Position Closed" rests on the ground like a grave marker.
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