Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEddie Murray
IN THE NEWS

Eddie Murray

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 14, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Eddie Murray believes that April really is the cruelest month, although the beginning of May is not so great, either. It's not until mid-May, now that he thinks about it, that his season seems to begin in any kind of earnest. That's what he says, anyway. This spring, though young, is shaping up like all the others. The newest Dodger has hit safely in just three of the team's first nine games and is five for 37. "A couple of at-bats, I felt like everything was right there," he said Thursday after his first eventful day in Dodger Stadium.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 17, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
An alleged stock tip has gone from a home run to a strikeout for Hall of Fame baseball player Eddie Murray. The onetime Dodgers first baseman agreed Friday to pay $358,151 to settle an investigation into whether he broke insider-trading laws when he bought shares of a Santa Ana company, allegedly on a tip from former major leaguer Doug DeCinces. The Securities and Exchange Commission accused the longtime Baltimore Orioles superstar of making $235,314 in illegal profit on advance knowledge of the 2009 buyout of Advanced Medical Optics Inc. by Illinois-based Abbott Laboratories Inc. Shares of Advanced Medical Optics, a medical eye-products company, shot up 143% after the acquisition was announced.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 17, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
An alleged stock tip has gone from a home run to a strikeout for Hall of Fame baseball player Eddie Murray. The onetime Dodgers first baseman agreed Friday to pay $358,151 to settle an investigation into whether he broke insider-trading laws when he bought shares of a Santa Ana company, allegedly on a tip from former major leaguer Doug DeCinces. The Securities and Exchange Commission accused the longtime Baltimore Orioles superstar of making $235,314 in illegal profit on advance knowledge of the 2009 buyout of Advanced Medical Optics Inc. by Illinois-based Abbott Laboratories Inc. Shares of Advanced Medical Optics, a medical eye-products company, shot up 143% after the acquisition was announced.
SPORTS
June 1, 2008 | Roch Kubatko, Baltimore Sun
BALTIMORE -- With one swing Saturday night, Manny Ramirez hit the 500th home run of his career and cranked up the volume in a ballpark that became his temporary home. If the noise level had climbed any higher, it might have violated a city ordinance. It certainly wasn't in keeping with standard baseball practices; visiting players aren't supposed to be loved so loudly. David Ortiz's sacrifice fly in the seventh inning scored rookie Jacoby Ellsbury with the go-ahead run, and Ramirez launched the first pitch from Orioles reliever Chad Bradford into the right-center-field seats, setting off a wild celebration that punctuated the Boston Red Sox's 6-3 victory before an announced 48,281.
SPORTS
October 12, 2000 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Murray, a future Hall of Famer who played parts of four seasons with the Dodgers, is a candidate to succeed former manager Davey Johnson, baseball sources said Wednesday. The Dodgers are not commenting on their managerial search, but sources said the Baltimore Orioles have given the Dodgers permission to speak with Murray, who has served as Baltimore's first base coach the last three seasons. Industry policy requires the Dodgers to interview minority candidates.
SPORTS
July 19, 1997 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
The Angels got a surprise visit from a future Hall of Famer Friday . . . Eddie Murray. Front-office executives did not expect Murray to spend two weeks rehabilitating at Class-A Lake Elsinore. Nor did they expect the 41-year old to be in Anaheim after two minor league starts. But there was Murray on Friday afternoon, taking batting practice before the Angel-Blue Jay game, all dressed up with no place to play.
SPORTS
December 1, 1988 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Fred Claire has indicated that he will go a distance in his bid to rebuild the right side of the Dodger infield. Tuesday, for instance, the Dodgers' executive vice president flew to Chicago for a meeting with Roland Hemond, his Baltimore Orioles counterpart, on a trade that would bring first baseman Eddie Murray to his hometown of Los Angeles.
SPORTS
September 3, 1997
Eddie Murray is back in the big leagues and back with the Dodgers, which is enough to make the intense slugger happy. Well, close enough for him. The future Hall of Famer was among nine players the Dodgers called up from triple-A Albuquerque on Tuesday when the rosters were expanded to 40. This is Murray's second stint with the team, having previously played for the Dodgers from 1989-91.
SPORTS
September 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
Why is it the guy who runs the Psychic Friends Network has to pay $500,000 for Eddie Murray's 500th home run ball? Why didn't he just call the network and find out where to sit with a fielder's glove? The ball Murray slammed Sept. 6 let him join Willie Mays and Hank Aaron as the only players with more than 3,000 career hits and 500 home runs.
SPORTS
August 28, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
The chant of "Eddie . . . Eddie . . . Eddie" that Baltimore first baseman Eddie Murray inspired with his three home runs Monday night may have come from an unexpected source--the partisan Angel fans of Anaheim Stadium--but the chant itself was not new to Murray. Tuesday night, however, the two standing ovations that a Big A crowd of 30,357 gave Jack Howell, the Angels' rookie third baseman, represented career firsts.
SPORTS
March 27, 2008 | JERRY CROWE
TNT's Charles Barkley says that no other team in the NBA has a third-best player better than the Lakers' versatile Lamar Odom. . . . Fans of the Boston Celtics and San Antonio Spurs probably would disagree, Odom's stellar productivity in Pau Gasol's absence notwithstanding. . . . Ray Allen, the Celtics' third-leading scorer, is an eight-time All-Star. . . . Manu Ginobili, not even a starter, is the Spurs' leading scorer. . . .
SPORTS
June 23, 2007
If a retirement planner from Pismo knows not to throw low fastballs to Matt Stairs but the Dodgers' pitching staff has never heard of such a report, either I missed my calling or Rick Honeycutt should carpool down to the unemployment line with Eddie Murray. BRUCE A. MCCLANAHAN Pismo Beach Mr. McCourt, will you please take down that right-field scoreboard? How many more players must be injured before you realize how dangerous it is? I watched in horror as James Loney went face first into it. Matt Kemp lost two months of the season because of it. Who cares about scores when you need to protect the most important investment -- the future of your organization.
SPORTS
June 16, 2007
Interesting scenario: The Dodgers hire the famously crabby Eddie Murray as their hitting coach after he runs Cleveland's bats into the ground; Colletti and Little say Murray's doing a great job, although the players grouse off the record that nobody can talk to him; the Dodgers sweep the Mets, outscoring New York, 18-5; then the Dodgers fire Murray. I guess there's a lot about baseball management I don't understand. BONNIE SLOANE Los Angeles Memo to Dodgers fans: When booing former Dodgers, you need to know the reason for their departure.
SPORTS
June 15, 2007 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Step 1: Fire Eddie Murray as hitting coach. Step 2: Go on offensive rampage. That two-step program worked wonders for the Cleveland Indians two years ago, and the Dodgers took the same first step on Thursday, in the hope of reviving their offense. In announcing the dismissal of Murray on Thursday, the Dodgers essentially said they believe in their hitters more than their Hall of Fame hitting coach. "We're under-hitting," Manager Grady Little said.
SPORTS
January 12, 2006 | Steve Henson, Times Staff Writer
The master of the frown was all smiles, wearing a Dodger cap and talking a blue streak. Eddie Murray seemingly granted more interviews in half an hour than he did in his 21-season Hall-of-Fame playing career. Murray loves to teach hitting, loves it so much he'll put up with the notebooks and microphones and incessant questions for the opportunity to coach.
SPORTS
June 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Cleveland Indians, struggling to score runs, fired hitting coach Eddie Murray, a Hall of Famer who was in his fourth year in the position. The Indians, with a potent offense a year ago, have scored only 75 runs in their last 16 games. Hitting coordinator Derek Shelton will take over as batting coach on an interim basis for the rest of the season.
SPORTS
June 20, 1995 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is about to become the 19th player with 3,000 hits. A year from now he might become the 15th with 500 home runs. At 39, a long way from the Los Angeles sandlots where he learned to hit a curveball by trying to time the unpredictable movements of Crisco can lids thrown by one of his four brothers, Eddie Murray continues to pile up credentials that should make him an automatic selection for the Hall of Fame, providing the voting writers overlook his seldom talking to them.
SPORTS
October 4, 1987 | RICHARD JUSTICE, The Washington Post
A few days before the beginning of spring training in 1986, Eddie Murray invited a reporter into his Los Angeles home, and for three hours, between trips to adjust a VCR and open cans of tea, he talked about the loves of his life -- his family, his friends and the Baltimore Orioles. It was a revealing and rare look at a private man in a public occupation and, that day, Murray said among other things he was proud to be named the Orioles' first captain and intended to make it more than a title.
SPORTS
May 16, 2005 | Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writer
When opportunity knocks, Eddie Murray is quick to answer. Whether it's stealing second on the pitcher's first move or turning a routine double into a breathtaking triple, Murray, a senior at Cerritos Gahr, is able to take advantage. Murray has the same attitude off the field: Work hard, study hard and always be prepared to answer the bell. A 5-foot-8, 155-pound shortstop, Murray signed with UCLA last fall.
SPORTS
July 28, 2003 | Ross Newhan, Times Staff Writer
A crowd estimated at 18,000, including former president George Bush, saluted the Hall of Fame induction of Gary Carter and Eddie Murray on Sunday, but it was the pinch-hitting of Johnny Bench and ad-libbing of Bob Uecker that seemed to steal the show. Bench, the Hall of Fame catcher, delivered a more than credible rendition of the Canadian National Anthem when Daniel Rodriguez, the scheduled singer, was unable to reach Cooperstown because of weather conditions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|