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Eden Pastora

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1986 | DOUG SMITH
Nicaraguan rebel leader Eden Pastora was scheduled to visit KGIL radio in San Fernando for a live interview last week, and I decided to drop by to see the famed Commander Zero and find out what message he had for the audience of "Valley Radio." As it turned out, though, I was late by 24 hours, and Pastora didn't show up at all. My excuse is easy to explain.
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NEWS
December 4, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Eden Pastora, the revolutionary hero who later took up arms against Nicaragua's left-wing Sandinista government, returned home Sunday after eight years of exile and condemned the leftist government and the U.S.-backed opposition. A crowd of 2,000 welcomed Pastora at a rally outside the National Palace, which he had captured with a squad of Sandinista troops in one of the most famous exploits of the 1979 war against former dictator Anastasio Somoza.
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NEWS
December 4, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Eden Pastora, the revolutionary hero who later took up arms against Nicaragua's left-wing Sandinista government, returned home Sunday after eight years of exile and condemned the leftist government and the U.S.-backed opposition. A crowd of 2,000 welcomed Pastora at a rally outside the National Palace, which he had captured with a squad of Sandinista troops in one of the most famous exploits of the 1979 war against former dictator Anastasio Somoza.
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The CIA's chief of operations in Central America has admitted that he allowed agency officers to assist the Nicaraguan rebels with weapons deliveries last year when the agency was prohibited from aiding the contras, and later concealed the fact from Congress, according to testimony released Tuesday. "I got a little too rambunctious," Alan D. Fiers, chief of the CIA's Central American Task Force, told the congressional Iran-contra investigating committees.
NEWS
July 26, 1985
Nicaraguan rebel leader Eden Pastora is "exhausted" and has bruised ribs and legs but is safe at a camp in the jungle of southern Nicaragua, a leader of his Revolutionary Democratic Alliance said. Pastora had been reported missing after his pilot radioed that their helicopter was having engine trouble. Pastora, 48, was a hero of the Sandinista revolution but broke with the government over its Marxist leadership.
NEWS
July 24, 1985 | Associated Press
Anti-Sandinista guerrilla leader Eden Pastora, known as Commander Zero, has disappeared and may have been shot down in a helicopter over Nicaragua, an official of his rebel force said today. Jose Davila, a member of the directorate of the Revolutionary Democratic Alliance, known by its Spanish acronym of ARDE, said guerrilla patrols have been combing the southern Nicaragua jungles for Pastora since the helicopter he was traveling in reported trouble Tuesday.
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The CIA's chief of operations in Central America has admitted that he allowed agency officers to assist the Nicaraguan rebels with weapons deliveries last year when the agency was prohibited from aiding the contras, and later concealed the fact from Congress, according to testimony released Tuesday. "I got a little too rambunctious," Alan D. Fiers, chief of the CIA's Central American Task Force, told the congressional Iran-contra investigating committees.
NEWS
March 6, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The commander of the main rebel force fighting Nicaragua's leftist regime emerged from the jungles Tuesday to lobby Congress for renewed aid for his struggle--only to run into firm opposition, some of it focused on him. "Everybody seems to be against us," lamented Enrique Bermudez, military chief of the Nicaraguan Democratic Force (FDN). "I've been surprised at how hard this fight is going to be."
NEWS
March 27, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Felicia Herrera, wife of a small-time cattleman, was not especially gratified to hear that the Sandinista government was going to build a new metal-roofed plank home for her. "Soldiers of the government forced us to leave our house and then they burned it," she said. "How can I be grateful to them?" Herrera considers herself a victim of a stepped-up drive against rightist guerrillas who operate in the rugged northern mountain regions.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Tony Avirgan, an American TV cameraman, remembers fire in his hair and a gong-like ringing in his ears when the bomb exploded at a clandestine press conference in the Nicaraguan jungle. Martha Honey, his wife, cannot forget the sight of Avirgan's shrapnel-torn body arriving on a stretcher at the hospital, amid the carnage of maimed colleagues, that night of May 30, 1984.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Tony Avirgan, an American TV cameraman, remembers fire in his hair and a gong-like ringing in his ears when the bomb exploded at a clandestine press conference in the Nicaraguan jungle. Martha Honey, his wife, cannot forget the sight of Avirgan's shrapnel-torn body arriving on a stretcher at the hospital, amid the carnage of maimed colleagues, that night of May 30, 1984.
NEWS
July 23, 1987
Former Nicaraguan contra leader Eden Pastora is considering an invitation to return to Nicaragua from exile in Costa Rica. Pastora, who as "Commander Zero" helped put the Sandinista government in power before rebelling against it, says he is waiting for a guarantee from the Marxist-led government that he will be granted complete freedom upon his return. Pastora abandoned his contra unit in 1986 for lack of funds and reportedly has been making a living in Costa Rica as a fisherman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1986 | DOUG SMITH
Nicaraguan rebel leader Eden Pastora was scheduled to visit KGIL radio in San Fernando for a live interview last week, and I decided to drop by to see the famed Commander Zero and find out what message he had for the audience of "Valley Radio." As it turned out, though, I was late by 24 hours, and Pastora didn't show up at all. My excuse is easy to explain.
NEWS
July 24, 1985 | Associated Press
Anti-Sandinista guerrilla leader Eden Pastora, known as Commander Zero, has disappeared and may have been shot down in a helicopter over Nicaragua, an official of his rebel force said today. Jose Davila, a member of the directorate of the Revolutionary Democratic Alliance, known by its Spanish acronym of ARDE, said guerrilla patrols have been combing the southern Nicaragua jungles for Pastora since the helicopter he was traveling in reported trouble Tuesday.
NEWS
March 27, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Felicia Herrera, wife of a small-time cattleman, was not especially gratified to hear that the Sandinista government was going to build a new metal-roofed plank home for her. "Soldiers of the government forced us to leave our house and then they burned it," she said. "How can I be grateful to them?" Herrera considers herself a victim of a stepped-up drive against rightist guerrillas who operate in the rugged northern mountain regions.
NEWS
March 6, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The commander of the main rebel force fighting Nicaragua's leftist regime emerged from the jungles Tuesday to lobby Congress for renewed aid for his struggle--only to run into firm opposition, some of it focused on him. "Everybody seems to be against us," lamented Enrique Bermudez, military chief of the Nicaraguan Democratic Force (FDN). "I've been surprised at how hard this fight is going to be."
NEWS
February 24, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Eden Pastora has faced down a challenge to his leadership of a Nicaraguan rebel army, but he is unable to give all his troops the wherewithal to fight. Most of Pastora's guerrillas are out of combat because they lack boots and bullets. Many are hungry and sick. The hard-pressed rebels hunker down in the remote backlands of southern Nicaragua, waiting for their chief to provide supplies and ammunition.
NEWS
February 24, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Eden Pastora has faced down a challenge to his leadership of a Nicaraguan rebel army, but he is unable to give all his troops the wherewithal to fight. Most of Pastora's guerrillas are out of combat because they lack boots and bullets. Many are hungry and sick. The hard-pressed rebels hunker down in the remote backlands of southern Nicaragua, waiting for their chief to provide supplies and ammunition.
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