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Edgar Chamorro

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NEWS
October 25, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
During his first week back in Nicaragua after seven years of exile, former Contra leader Edgar Chamorro met a hostile cattleman who warned him that the Sandinista government would use him "like a rancher uses one steer to corral all the rest." At a dinner party, a businesswoman angrily told Chamorro it would be best for everyone if "you keep your mouth shut."
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NEWS
October 25, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
During his first week back in Nicaragua after seven years of exile, former Contra leader Edgar Chamorro met a hostile cattleman who warned him that the Sandinista government would use him "like a rancher uses one steer to corral all the rest." At a dinner party, a businesswoman angrily told Chamorro it would be best for everyone if "you keep your mouth shut."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1987
Bosco Matamoros' article (Editorial Pages, June 14), "Blame Sandinistas If Civilians Die in War," is a transparent and futile attempt to control the political damage to the Reagan Administration's policy of supporting the contras, which has resulted from the murder of Benjamin Linder, a U.S. citizen who was executed by the contras last April while he was helping to build a hydroelectric power plant in a poor rural area in Nicaragua. Matamoros argues that the contras have been unfairly blamed for what he calls "alleged attacks" on civilians in Nicaragua, and labels as "Sandinista propaganda" the accusations that the contras have committed human rights violations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edgar Chamorro, a former Contra leader who later became a critic of U.S. policies in Nicaragua, said Wednesday that the recent elections in that country were neither free nor honest because of the infusion of U.S. dollars and political influence. For Nicaraguans, the choice was simple, he said: continued war, poverty and inflation or opposition candidate Violeta Barrios de Chamorro. "They were not electing a president, they were electing a way out," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
An immigration judge ruled Tuesday that she will hold a hearing on whether immigrants accused of belonging to a Marxist faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization were unconstitutionally the targets of deportation efforts because of their political views and ethnic background. Overruling government objections that she does not have jurisdiction to decide whether due process, or fairness, rights of the aliens had been violated, U.S. Immigration Judge Ingrid K.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Former contra leader Edgar Chamorro returned to Nicaragua on Monday night after seven years in exile, becoming the first well-known anti-Sandinista to accept amnesty. Chamorro, who broke with the contras in 1984 over CIA control of the rebel movement, said he is coming back "to test the sincerity" of the Sandinistas in complying with a Central American peace plan that commits them to democratic reforms. In recent years, Chamorro has lobbied the U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Mounting charges of atrocities against civilians by U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebels took center stage Thursday in Congress' debate on Central America, sparking angry charges from the Reagan Administration that human rights groups are acting on behalf of the leftist Sandinista regime. Two private human rights organizations issued reports this week charging the contras , as the Nicaraguan rebels are commonly called, with a pattern of attacks on civilians, including murder, torture and rape.
NEWS
May 9, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department said Friday that Immigration and Naturalization Commissioner Alan Nelson made the recent key decision to alter subversion charges against eight Los Angeles-area immigrants accused of participating in a Marxist faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization. "The decision was made by the commissioner of the INS," Patrick Korten, deputy director of the Justice Department's public affairs office, told The Times.
OPINION
July 20, 1986 | DAVID C. Mac MICHAEL, David C. MacMichael, a former CIA analyst and counterinsurgency specialist, is a senior research fellow at the Washington-based Council on Hemispheric Affairs.
In the months before Congress voted military assistance to the anti-government forces in Nicaragua, CIA and Pentagon analysts conceded that the contra project had been an abject military and political failure. Their estimate was a stark one: It would take at least two to three years of training and re-equipping, at funding levels far higher than the Reagan Administration's current request, before the contras posed a realistic threat to the Sandinista government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1986 | MANUEL GOMEZ, Manuel Gomez is president of the Cuban-American Committee in Washington.
In an ominous coincidence, the House will vote again on aid for the Nicaraguan contras on the 25th anniversary of the CIA-directed attack on Cuba that ended at the Bay of Pigs. I was 13 and in my home in Havana when we all awoke that morning to the sound of explosions from a nearby military airfield. In the next few days I would get a crash course in political science; years of reflection in my adult life have only confirmed what I began to learn on that April 15.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Top Nicaraguan rebel leaders told President Reagan on Thursday that the contras could fight until a scheduled Nov. 7 cease-fire without new U.S. military aid, but they asked him for more humanitarian aid in any event and a military "escrow account" to be tapped should the region's shaky peace plans collapse. The President supports the aid request's "general approach," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said after Reagan met with the rebel leaders here.
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