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Edgar Degas

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
On a recent Monday at the Norton Simon Museum, everything was in its usual spot in the grand gallery where visitors first encounter an extraordinary collection of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art. Edgar Degas' "Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen," a must-see for little girls who dream of becoming ballerinas, was still the centerpiece. The bronze statue with a net tutu and satin hair ribbon was surrounded by smaller Degas sculptures and paintings by Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Camille Pissarro, Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
On a recent Monday at the Norton Simon Museum, everything was in its usual spot in the grand gallery where visitors first encounter an extraordinary collection of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art. Edgar Degas' "Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen," a must-see for little girls who dream of becoming ballerinas, was still the centerpiece. The bronze statue with a net tutu and satin hair ribbon was surrounded by smaller Degas sculptures and paintings by Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Camille Pissarro, Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.
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WORLD
February 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Two masterworks stolen from a Zurich art museum last week were found in good condition in an unlocked car outside a psychiatric hospital, police said, but two other paintings are still missing. The recovered paintings, Claude Monet's "Poppy Field at Vetheuil" and Vincent van Gogh's "Blooming Chestnut Branches," were found by a parking lot attendant Monday. Police said they had a combined value of $63 million. Still missing are "Ludovic Lepic and his Daughters" by Edgar Degas and "Boy in the Red Waistcoat" by Paul Cezanne.
WORLD
February 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Two masterworks stolen from a Zurich art museum last week were found in good condition in an unlocked car outside a psychiatric hospital, police said, but two other paintings are still missing. The recovered paintings, Claude Monet's "Poppy Field at Vetheuil" and Vincent van Gogh's "Blooming Chestnut Branches," were found by a parking lot attendant Monday. Police said they had a combined value of $63 million. Still missing are "Ludovic Lepic and his Daughters" by Edgar Degas and "Boy in the Red Waistcoat" by Paul Cezanne.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1998
What's happening the next few weeks: * The first retrospective in more than 30 years of American painter Jackson Pollock's work opens Nov. 1 at the Museum of Modern Art. Ends Feb. 2. Sept. 17-Jan. 12: "The New York School" presents drawings from the museum's collection by artists affiliated with the New York School, including works by Helen Frankenthaler, Arshile Gorky, Adolph Gottlieb, Philip Guston, Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Robert Motherwell, Barnett Newman and David Smith. 11 W.
BOOKS
December 10, 2006 | Kristina Lindgren, kris.lindgren@latimes.com
EDGAR DEGAS' "The Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer," was a revelation to a beginning balletomane. In her 100-year-old tulle skirt, tights sagging ever so slightly at her knobby knees, the bronze of Marie Van Goethem, slippered feet firmly planted in fourth position, transported me to the Paris Opera ballet school in the late 1870s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
Spring break and Easter weekend brought the expected crowds to the Getty Center. And, as usual, many visitors made a beeline for the museum's most popular gallery to see Vincent van Gogh's "Irises" and paintings by French Impressionists such as Paul Cezanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Claude Monet. The favorites were there, but so were two surprises. One is a new acquisition, "The Milliners," a late work by Edgar Degas purchased from Acquavella Galleries in New York for an undisclosed price.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
"Edgar Degas, Photographer." Exhibition titles don't get much shorter or more direct than that. Crisp and to the point, the name seems to indicate that the show, opening Tuesday at the J. Paul Getty Museum needs no explanation. But those who leap to the obvious conclusion and expect to see photographic equivalents of the French Impressionist's famous paintings, drawings and prints are in for a shock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It measures 28 inches by 40 inches, an unlikely pastel of fields and smokestacks by a French artist best known for painting ballet dancers. But the battle over the work by Edgar Degas is a roiling one, and a prime example of the ongoing struggles over art seized by the Nazis during World War II. On one side is a once-prominent Dutch family that suffered greatly at the hands of the Nazis.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Culturally literate citizens have the feeling they know the art of Edgar Degas. He seems to have invented whole unforgettable chapters in our picture book of 19th-Century Paris. Who has not been charmed by his stumpy ballerinas and leggy horses? Who has failed to smile at his weary laundresses or pretty young things staving off boredom by trying on hats at the milliners?
BOOKS
December 10, 2006 | Kristina Lindgren, kris.lindgren@latimes.com
EDGAR DEGAS' "The Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer," was a revelation to a beginning balletomane. In her 100-year-old tulle skirt, tights sagging ever so slightly at her knobby knees, the bronze of Marie Van Goethem, slippered feet firmly planted in fourth position, transported me to the Paris Opera ballet school in the late 1870s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
Spring break and Easter weekend brought the expected crowds to the Getty Center. And, as usual, many visitors made a beeline for the museum's most popular gallery to see Vincent van Gogh's "Irises" and paintings by French Impressionists such as Paul Cezanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Claude Monet. The favorites were there, but so were two surprises. One is a new acquisition, "The Milliners," a late work by Edgar Degas purchased from Acquavella Galleries in New York for an undisclosed price.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
"Edgar Degas, Photographer." Exhibition titles don't get much shorter or more direct than that. Crisp and to the point, the name seems to indicate that the show, opening Tuesday at the J. Paul Getty Museum needs no explanation. But those who leap to the obvious conclusion and expect to see photographic equivalents of the French Impressionist's famous paintings, drawings and prints are in for a shock.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1998
What's happening the next few weeks: * The first retrospective in more than 30 years of American painter Jackson Pollock's work opens Nov. 1 at the Museum of Modern Art. Ends Feb. 2. Sept. 17-Jan. 12: "The New York School" presents drawings from the museum's collection by artists affiliated with the New York School, including works by Helen Frankenthaler, Arshile Gorky, Adolph Gottlieb, Philip Guston, Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Robert Motherwell, Barnett Newman and David Smith. 11 W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It measures 28 inches by 40 inches, an unlikely pastel of fields and smokestacks by a French artist best known for painting ballet dancers. But the battle over the work by Edgar Degas is a roiling one, and a prime example of the ongoing struggles over art seized by the Nazis during World War II. On one side is a once-prominent Dutch family that suffered greatly at the hands of the Nazis.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Culturally literate citizens have the feeling they know the art of Edgar Degas. He seems to have invented whole unforgettable chapters in our picture book of 19th-Century Paris. Who has not been charmed by his stumpy ballerinas and leggy horses? Who has failed to smile at his weary laundresses or pretty young things staving off boredom by trying on hats at the milliners?
TRAVEL
October 21, 1990 | PETER MIKELBANK, Mikelbank is a free-lance writer based in Paris
The Seine rarely dances in Paris. Surrounded by city, unconnected to nature, it's a sullen, dark river, industrially trafficked and plowed to an incessant tourist highway. A green river; sometimes, a gray-blue shade like steel, along a high corridor of stone. Only as the Seine approaches suburban precincts does the river's lively brasher color, the silver of sunlight played on water, return.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The late British supermarket tycoon Simon Sainsbury left 18 paintings worth as much as $200 million to Tate Britain and the National Gallery in a bequest that the two galleries described as the most significant in memory. The paintings, including works by Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Thomas Gainsborough and Francis Bacon, came from Sainsbury's private collection. He died last year at age 76. The Tate will receive 13 works and the National Gallery will receive five paintings.
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