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Edgar Wright

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2011
MOVIES Edgar Wright Triple Feature With a cinematic oeuvre that features comedic zombies, explosion-happy British village constables and guitar-wielding teen heroes, the English director distinguished himself with a unique comedic vision. He'll share inspirations and methods of his films ? "Shaun of the Dean, "Hot Fuzz" and "Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World. " New Beverly Cinema, 7165 Beverly Blvd., L.A. Fri.-Sat., 7:30 p.m., $7. (323) 938-4038. Graphation Film Festival In recent years, comic books and graphic novels have proved fertile ground for Hollywood movie adaptations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Steven Price, who brought an experimental edge to the sound of "Gravity," Alfonso Cuarón's 3-D outer space disaster film, won the Oscar for original score. Full of tension and a mixture of orchestral and digital sounds, Price's score serve as one of the film's characters -- the never-ending galaxy that is the film's setting.  "Every element was manipulated through a synthesizer so that you're never sure what's organic and what's electronic," Price recently told The Times . "We were very keen to avoid the conventions of a typical action score.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
August has been a particularly rich month for movies that fall between the mindless, overblown summer superhero blockbusters and the polished prestige of the super-serious Oscar brigade to come. Edgar Wright's "The World's End" is the right movie for this moment, a comedy with action and wow-factor effects that's also tinged by regret, a light sadness and a lacerating self-awareness. Even for its flaws, it is hard to ask for more from a late summer movie than "The World's End. " The film finds the director collaborating again with Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, the trio having burst on the scene with their zombie pastiche "Shaun of the Dead" and cop sendup "Hot Fuzz.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Robert Abele
We could start with why a hermit-like London writer, steeped in research about Victorian-era killers and afraid of being murdered himself, would keep his ratty flat in near total darkness. But the dreary, loud, amateurish horror-comedy “A Fantastic Fear of Everything” starring Simon Pegg as said author, isn't terribly interested in logic. Or continuity. Or filmmaking acumen. Or, most glaringly, laughs. Writer/director Crispian Mills, a rock musician making his feature directing debut, starts with an interminable set-up in which a bushy-haired Pegg -- in bathrobe and briefs and evincing a sort of reverse charm from his engaging turns in pal Edgar Wright's movies (“Shaun of the Dead,” “The World's End”)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Labor Day is almost here and we're deep enough into the calendar year that when a film critic declares a picture to be "light-years the most entertaining movie of the year," we sit up and take notice -- even if the year as a whole has been almost entirely bereft of "entertaining" movies, or, at least, the kind of movies that aspire to merely entertain and not make you dwell on tragedy ("Fruitvale Station"), the emptiness of our culture ("The Bling Ring") or the struggles that come with aging and evolving with someone you love ("Before Midnight")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
There's no dispute that "Despicable Me 2" is a runaway smash. On Saturday, the animated sequel eclipsed $800 million at the global box office, more than $250 million better than the 2010 original. That total puts "Despicable Me 2" in the top 40 of worldwide releases of all time (not adjusted for inflation), ahead of "E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial" and "Star Wars," and within close striking distance of "Inception" and "Spider-Man. "  PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments In local theaters, with $348.8 million in sales to date, "Despicable Me 2" trails only "Iron Man 3," which has grossed $408.4 million in North America, as the year's top domestic theatrical title.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
Natural and supernatural forces go haywire in the male midlife hysteria of "The World's End," starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Paddy Considine and others of the fab and fabled "Hot Fuzz" and "Shaun of the Dead" crews. The comic blast follows five fortyish friends who reunite 20 years after they failed to make it to the World's End, the final pub on their hometown's infamous crawl. Directed by Edgar Wright and co-written with Pegg, the movie begins as a cheeky reflection on boys who grow up, and the ones who don't.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Robert Abele
We could start with why a hermit-like London writer, steeped in research about Victorian-era killers and afraid of being murdered himself, would keep his ratty flat in near total darkness. But the dreary, loud, amateurish horror-comedy “A Fantastic Fear of Everything” starring Simon Pegg as said author, isn't terribly interested in logic. Or continuity. Or filmmaking acumen. Or, most glaringly, laughs. Writer/director Crispian Mills, a rock musician making his feature directing debut, starts with an interminable set-up in which a bushy-haired Pegg -- in bathrobe and briefs and evincing a sort of reverse charm from his engaging turns in pal Edgar Wright's movies (“Shaun of the Dead,” “The World's End”)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Steven Price, who brought an experimental edge to the sound of "Gravity," Alfonso Cuarón's 3-D outer space disaster film, won the Oscar for original score. Full of tension and a mixture of orchestral and digital sounds, Price's score serve as one of the film's characters -- the never-ending galaxy that is the film's setting.  "Every element was manipulated through a synthesizer so that you're never sure what's organic and what's electronic," Price recently told The Times . "We were very keen to avoid the conventions of a typical action score.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "Attack the Block," the feature writing and directing debut of British comedian Joe Cornish, an alien invasion occurs in a London public housing complex, and only a group of teenagers seems to notice. Pulsing with a rowdy energy, the film works as both a sci-fi horror flick and a teen adventure film. The greatest turn that Cornish pulls off is opening the movie with his protagonists mugging a woman (Jodie Whittaker) and still somehow making them seem, as the story unfolds, worth getting to know (while never excusing their nascent thuggery)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
The past few months have been hailed as some of the strongest in modern cinema. But even in a year that saw landmark achievements duly recognized, there were films that didn't seem to get their share of respect. With that in mind, we ask, in our fourth-annual "most underappreciated movie" poll, to choose the film that deserved dollars and accolades but couldn't seem to manage enough of either. (Past poll winners, to give you an indication, were “Bernie” in 2012, “The Debt" in 2011 and “Let Me In” in 2010.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
Natural and supernatural forces go haywire in the male midlife hysteria of "The World's End," starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Paddy Considine and others of the fab and fabled "Hot Fuzz" and "Shaun of the Dead" crews. The comic blast follows five fortyish friends who reunite 20 years after they failed to make it to the World's End, the final pub on their hometown's infamous crawl. Directed by Edgar Wright and co-written with Pegg, the movie begins as a cheeky reflection on boys who grow up, and the ones who don't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
There's no dispute that "Despicable Me 2" is a runaway smash. On Saturday, the animated sequel eclipsed $800 million at the global box office, more than $250 million better than the 2010 original. That total puts "Despicable Me 2" in the top 40 of worldwide releases of all time (not adjusted for inflation), ahead of "E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial" and "Star Wars," and within close striking distance of "Inception" and "Spider-Man. "  PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments In local theaters, with $348.8 million in sales to date, "Despicable Me 2" trails only "Iron Man 3," which has grossed $408.4 million in North America, as the year's top domestic theatrical title.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
"The World's End," the latest film from director Edgar Wright and actors Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, marks the third installment in their Cornetto Trilogy, along with the zombie farce "Shaun of the Dead" and the cop comedy "Hot Fuzz. " The trilogy takes its name from a British ice cream confection that appears in all three movies, so it's somewhat fitting that critics have found "The World's End" to be a delectable end-of-summer treat. The Times' Mark Olsen says that after a summer of mindless action movies, and before another solemn awards season, "'The World's End' is the right movie for this moment, a comedy with action and wow-factor effects that's also tinged by regret, a light sadness and a lacerating self-awareness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
August has been a particularly rich month for movies that fall between the mindless, overblown summer superhero blockbusters and the polished prestige of the super-serious Oscar brigade to come. Edgar Wright's "The World's End" is the right movie for this moment, a comedy with action and wow-factor effects that's also tinged by regret, a light sadness and a lacerating self-awareness. Even for its flaws, it is hard to ask for more from a late summer movie than "The World's End. " The film finds the director collaborating again with Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, the trio having burst on the scene with their zombie pastiche "Shaun of the Dead" and cop sendup "Hot Fuzz.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Labor Day is almost here and we're deep enough into the calendar year that when a film critic declares a picture to be "light-years the most entertaining movie of the year," we sit up and take notice -- even if the year as a whole has been almost entirely bereft of "entertaining" movies, or, at least, the kind of movies that aspire to merely entertain and not make you dwell on tragedy ("Fruitvale Station"), the emptiness of our culture ("The Bling Ring") or the struggles that come with aging and evolving with someone you love ("Before Midnight")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
For Bill Hader fans, Saturday was a dark day, as it marked the actor's last episode as a regular cast member of "Saturday Night Live. " Hader, 34, takes with him beloved characters like enthusiastic "Weekend Update" city correspondent Stefon, creepy "Dateline" correspondent Keith Morrison and classic Hollywood horror figure Vincent Price. The transition from "SNL" to film work can be a bumpy one, but Hader has already been smoothing a path -- he and Kristen Wiig costar as twins who cheat death in the upcoming comedy "The Skeleton Twins"; he plays a loser swimming pool manager in "The To-Do List," a romantic comedy written and directed by his wife, Maggie Carey; and he voices characters in two 2013 animated movies, "Turbo" and "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2. " PHOTOS: SNL cast members - Where are they now?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
The past few months have been hailed as some of the strongest in modern cinema. But even in a year that saw landmark achievements duly recognized, there were films that didn't seem to get their share of respect. With that in mind, we ask, in our fourth-annual "most underappreciated movie" poll, to choose the film that deserved dollars and accolades but couldn't seem to manage enough of either. (Past poll winners, to give you an indication, were “Bernie” in 2012, “The Debt" in 2011 and “Let Me In” in 2010.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
For Bill Hader fans, Saturday was a dark day, as it marked the actor's last episode as a regular cast member of "Saturday Night Live. " Hader, 34, takes with him beloved characters like enthusiastic "Weekend Update" city correspondent Stefon, creepy "Dateline" correspondent Keith Morrison and classic Hollywood horror figure Vincent Price. The transition from "SNL" to film work can be a bumpy one, but Hader has already been smoothing a path -- he and Kristen Wiig costar as twins who cheat death in the upcoming comedy "The Skeleton Twins"; he plays a loser swimming pool manager in "The To-Do List," a romantic comedy written and directed by his wife, Maggie Carey; and he voices characters in two 2013 animated movies, "Turbo" and "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2. " PHOTOS: SNL cast members - Where are they now?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "Attack the Block," the feature writing and directing debut of British comedian Joe Cornish, an alien invasion occurs in a London public housing complex, and only a group of teenagers seems to notice. Pulsing with a rowdy energy, the film works as both a sci-fi horror flick and a teen adventure film. The greatest turn that Cornish pulls off is opening the movie with his protagonists mugging a woman (Jodie Whittaker) and still somehow making them seem, as the story unfolds, worth getting to know (while never excusing their nascent thuggery)
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