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Edible Flowers

HOME & GARDEN
February 20, 1999 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When my daughter's teacher asked me to do a gardening project with her second-grade class at Eldorado School for the Gifted in Orange, I asked my daughter, Sabrina, if she thought edible flowers would interest her fellow classmates. "No," she said, in the straightforward manner of a 7-year-old. "The boys will think flowers are a girl thing." Because her class has more boys than girls, Sabrina's opinion momentarily dampened my enthusiasm.
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HOME & GARDEN
February 20, 1999
* Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum): This tender perennial grows about 3 1/2 feet tall and has lilac-purple flower spikes that have a sweet anise flavor resembling root beer. The flowers are good to use in Asian-style dishes, marinades and baking. Sprinkle anise flowers onto fruit and bake, or add to cookie and cake recipes. Seeds for this plant can be found in many mail-order catalogs. Grow in full sun or partial shade and give moderate water.
HOME & GARDEN
June 27, 1998 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Go ahead, take a whiff of the rose . . . then chew its pretty head off. OK, that's drastic, but it's close to what Cathy Wilkinson Barash suggests in "Edible Flowers: Desserts & Drinks" ($16.95, Fulcrum Publishing, 1998) and "Edible Flowers: From Garden to Palate" ($24.95, Fulcrum, 1996). When Barash gets giddy over a blossom, she may wax on about color, form and scent, but full-tilt appreciation comes only after it's between her teeth.
FOOD
May 5, 1994 | SYLVIA THOMPSON
Recently I had an hour to kill, so naturally I headed for the nearest supermarket. Ambling down the produce aisles, the air sparkling from mist bursting over fruits and vegetables, I yearned to taste everything. In the luxury section I stopped to admire the skinny enoki mushrooms from Malaysia, the alligator-skinned cherimoyas from Spain, the lime-green coils of fiddleheads from a riverbank who knew where. And, what's this? A passel of Johnny-jump-ups!
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The next time you're out dining and a sunburst-colored marigold shows up on yoursalad plate, don't flick it aside. Go ahead, eat it. Really, it's eatable. And it just might surprise your taste buds. No longer just a restaurateur's culinary embellishment, edible flowers are now available year-round for your dining pleasure at home. In Ventura County you'll find a variety at the gourmet markets, upscale grocery stores and area farmers' markets.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe and Cheryl Amestoy of Ojai have combined their expertise to create the newest addition to Ventura County's rich source of roadside produce outlets. And what Joe-the-architect and Cheryl-the-herb-garden-specialist have devised is an artful approach to selling their organically grown wares. In front of their home, along Highway 150 in upper Ojai, is an alluring structure made of tall scaffolding, rust-laden recycled metals, 100-year-old oil rig parts and two, large cylindrical tanks.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | PAT GERBER
Ah, springtime approaches! Time to stop and smell the roses . . . maybe even nibble a few. Flowers, after all, do more than delight the eyes or perfume the air. They can also tickle the taste buds. Consider a creamy sauce made from rose petals and spooned over scones, says chef George Geary of Fullerton. "If you love the smell of roses, you'll love rose petal sauce," he says. Or try scrunching up some fresh lavender flowers into an apple pie or apple crisp.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | KITTY MORSE, Kitty Morse is a free-lance writer and cookbook author living in Vista.
Nibbling flower petals might seem a little out of place in a world more in tune with take-out food and TV dinners, but consumer interest in edible flowers is enjoying a resurgence. You can buy edible flowers in the grocery store and at area farmers' markets. Rare is the upscale North County restaurant chef nowadays who doesn't use an edible flower or two as the final touch for a signature dish. The use of edible flowers as flavorings or medicines reaches back to ancient times.
REAL ESTATE
July 8, 1990 | DOC ABRAHAM and KATY ABRAHAM
QUESTION: We want to grow flowers that can be used in salads and drinks, but are not sure which are safe. Is there any way you can tell if a flower is not edible? Please name a few toxic ones and a few that are edible. ANSWER: There's no way you can tell if a flower is toxic or not, except by eating it. Be careful which ones you use. Some handsome flowers, such as delphinium are very toxic if eaten, while nasturtiums and violets are widely used.
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