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Edie Adams

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1986 | JACK HAWN
What's this, the "cigar girl" starring in "The Merry Widow"? True. Edie Adams, associated with the Muriel cigar company for decades, has top billing in the Long Beach Civic Light Opera production of Franz Lehar's classic operetta Saturday through March 16 at the Terrace Theater. Still occasionally referred to as the "cigar girl" after almost 20 years of doing the sexy Muriel TV commercial that helped make her famous, Adams landed the "Widow" role less than a month before opening night.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The late actor, comedian, writer and musician Sid Caesar was a comic Renaissance man. Though best known for the TV series "Your Show of Shows," he was also a regular presence on the stage and the big screen. Here's a look at five of his most memorable movie roles. "Tars and Spars. "  Caesar's first movie came out of his time in the Coast Guard, where he wrote and performed sketches for the service's musical revues. After playing a comic supporting role in the musical "Tars and Spars," about a would-be sailor who falls for a singer and woos her under the pretense he is a hero, Caesar was cast in the 1946 Columbia Pictures film adaptation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
You have to wonder what Ernie Kovacs would have done with all of this, what kind of gleeful skit, what kind of satirical sketch, what kind of twist he would have put on what is happening in his name now. For suddenly, it seems, it's time again for "The Ernie Kovacs Show." On several fronts--on television, on home videos, in special shows and exhibitions, and in books--Ernie Kovacs is being remembered, discovered and celebrated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2008 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Edie Adams, the Tony award-winning actress and singer who was perhaps best known to a generation of television viewers as the seductive commercial spokeswoman for Muriel Cigars, has died. She was 81. Adams, the widow of the legendary comedian Ernie Kovacs, died Wednesday at West Hills Hospital and Medical Center of complications from pneumonia and cancer, according to her son, Josh Mills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1989 | EDWARD J. BOYER
"That machine and I are mortal enemies," Edie Adams said of her word processor. But it is an enemy she must embrace if she is to finish "this damned . . . this wonderful book" by her deadline this spring. "There's so much stuff here," she said. "I've been leading about seven different lives. This book is a lion I'm fighting every day."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The late actor, comedian, writer and musician Sid Caesar was a comic Renaissance man. Though best known for the TV series "Your Show of Shows," he was also a regular presence on the stage and the big screen. Here's a look at five of his most memorable movie roles. "Tars and Spars. "  Caesar's first movie came out of his time in the Coast Guard, where he wrote and performed sketches for the service's musical revues. After playing a comic supporting role in the musical "Tars and Spars," about a would-be sailor who falls for a singer and woos her under the pretense he is a hero, Caesar was cast in the 1946 Columbia Pictures film adaptation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2008 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Edie Adams, the Tony award-winning actress and singer who was perhaps best known to a generation of television viewers as the seductive commercial spokeswoman for Muriel Cigars, has died. She was 81. Adams, the widow of the legendary comedian Ernie Kovacs, died Wednesday at West Hills Hospital and Medical Center of complications from pneumonia and cancer, according to her son, Josh Mills.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Edie Adams, bless her, used to be the most delectable damsel in Dogpatch. She may well have been Ernie Kovacs' better half in more ways than one. She is, without question, the greatest thing that ever happened to one of the most vile inventions of Western civilization, the cigar. It would be nice, no doubt, to see her in a snazzy revival of "Annie, Get Your Gun." Or perhaps the definitive Sister Eileen of yesteryear is ready to graduate to Auntie Mame. She has the right credentials.
BOOKS
September 9, 1990 | Lawrence Christon, Christon is a Times staff writer.
For anyone who was around in the 1950s, when the medium of television was relatively new and hadn't yet become altogether defined, in Robert Hughes' phrase, as "wet-nurse to the culture," mere mention of the name Ernie Kovacs is enough to induce a near-paralysis of reverie. The Kapusta Kid, Percy Dovetonsils, the Nairobi Trio, Uncle Gruesome, the endlessly inventive bits that teased our naturalistic assumptions about time and space as viewed on the tube, the sheer sense of fun and gentle play that emanated from a Kovacs show, were wholly innovative then--and unmatched since (though the Monty Python troupe has come close)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991
Classic Movie Night continues Monday at 7 p.m. at the St. James Club, 8358 Sunset Blvd. with a film clip tribute to Martha Raye, who will be present. Edith Fellows will appear Oct. 14 with "Pennies From Heaven," in which she starred with Bing Crosby. Other guests will be Edie Adams (Oct. 28), Sybil Jason (Nov. 18), Ann Miller (Nov. 25), Gretchen Wyler (Dec. 2) and Betty Garrett (Dec. 9). A special Christmas show is set Dec. 16. Information: (213) 289-0254.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
You have to wonder what Ernie Kovacs would have done with all of this, what kind of gleeful skit, what kind of satirical sketch, what kind of twist he would have put on what is happening in his name now. For suddenly, it seems, it's time again for "The Ernie Kovacs Show." On several fronts--on television, on home videos, in special shows and exhibitions, and in books--Ernie Kovacs is being remembered, discovered and celebrated.
BOOKS
September 9, 1990 | Lawrence Christon, Christon is a Times staff writer.
For anyone who was around in the 1950s, when the medium of television was relatively new and hadn't yet become altogether defined, in Robert Hughes' phrase, as "wet-nurse to the culture," mere mention of the name Ernie Kovacs is enough to induce a near-paralysis of reverie. The Kapusta Kid, Percy Dovetonsils, the Nairobi Trio, Uncle Gruesome, the endlessly inventive bits that teased our naturalistic assumptions about time and space as viewed on the tube, the sheer sense of fun and gentle play that emanated from a Kovacs show, were wholly innovative then--and unmatched since (though the Monty Python troupe has come close)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1989 | EDWARD J. BOYER
"That machine and I are mortal enemies," Edie Adams said of her word processor. But it is an enemy she must embrace if she is to finish "this damned . . . this wonderful book" by her deadline this spring. "There's so much stuff here," she said. "I've been leading about seven different lives. This book is a lion I'm fighting every day."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Edie Adams, bless her, used to be the most delectable damsel in Dogpatch. She may well have been Ernie Kovacs' better half in more ways than one. She is, without question, the greatest thing that ever happened to one of the most vile inventions of Western civilization, the cigar. It would be nice, no doubt, to see her in a snazzy revival of "Annie, Get Your Gun." Or perhaps the definitive Sister Eileen of yesteryear is ready to graduate to Auntie Mame. She has the right credentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1986 | JACK HAWN
What's this, the "cigar girl" starring in "The Merry Widow"? True. Edie Adams, associated with the Muriel cigar company for decades, has top billing in the Long Beach Civic Light Opera production of Franz Lehar's classic operetta Saturday through March 16 at the Terrace Theater. Still occasionally referred to as the "cigar girl" after almost 20 years of doing the sexy Muriel TV commercial that helped make her famous, Adams landed the "Widow" role less than a month before opening night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND and DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Television Academy Hall of Fame Sunday was to induct Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Leonard Goldenson, Jim Henson, Ernie Kovacs and Eric Sevareid during a ceremony taped for presentation Nov. 30 by Fox Broadcasting Co. The two-hour show will feature rare and vintage film chronicling the careers of the inductees, as well as tributes from such celebrities as Lucille Ball, Walter Cronkite, Phyllis Diller, Jack Lemon and David Wolper.
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