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Edison Charter Academy

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March 18, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's wrong with this picture? The children at Edison Charter Academy--formerly one of this city's most notorious schools--are learning to read and do math. Their test scores have begun to improve. Their parents are delighted. But the board of education, here in the nation's most ideological city, wants to kick out the for-profit corporation that has run the campus for the past three years: Edison Schools Inc., which vowed at its birth to revolutionize education in America.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Last spring, the graceful old campus of Edison Charter Academy in San Francisco became the battleground for a bitter ideological struggle over the role of for-profit companies in running public schools. The school's backers contended that, under a contract with the nation's largest such education management company, "test scores have gone sky-high." But the local school board was both dubious of those results and philosophically opposed to a private firm making money from public education.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Last spring, the graceful old campus of Edison Charter Academy in San Francisco became the battleground for a bitter ideological struggle over the role of for-profit companies in running public schools. The school's backers contended that, under a contract with the nation's largest such education management company, "test scores have gone sky-high." But the local school board was both dubious of those results and philosophically opposed to a private firm making money from public education.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's wrong with this picture? The children at Edison Charter Academy--formerly one of this city's most notorious schools--are learning to read and do math. Their test scores have begun to improve. Their parents are delighted. But the board of education, here in the nation's most ideological city, wants to kick out the for-profit corporation that has run the campus for the past three years: Edison Schools Inc., which vowed at its birth to revolutionize education in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Board of Education voted Thursday in Sacramento to allow a controversial charter school run here by the for-profit Edison Schools Inc. to reopen under state control after summer vacation. After three years of acrimony, the San Francisco Board of Education voted two weeks ago to sever most of its ties with the Edison Charter Academy, which operated in the city's upscale Noe Valley neighborhood.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
School board members have given Edison Schools Inc. 90 days to fix problems that critics claim exist at the city's only for-profit school. The board's 6-1 vote late Tuesday followed the release of a district investigation launched about a month ago, following complaints by parents, students and teachers. But Edison has said the real problem is that some people do not approve of having a private company run a public school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2003 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
With great ceremony, Arnold Schwarzenegger took his staff and press corps to Edison-Bethune Charter Academy in Fresno last week to emphasize that education is his issue. But in practice, the visit to a charter school in a city where charters have been the subject of scandal served to demonstrate his unfamiliarity with the state's education policy, its rigid system of student testing, and its most popular experiment with school choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2003 | Gregg Jones, Joe Mathews and James Rainey, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Gray Davis on Thursday offered Indian tribes a key role in picking members of the state commission that regulates tribal gambling, as he and two of the candidates to replace him sought support from Native Americans in the recall election. It was a testament to the tribes' growing political clout in the state that Davis, Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante and state Sen.
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