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Edith H Jones

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July 25, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the end, the decision came down to two candidates and one issue. The candidates were David H. Souter of New Hampshire and Edith H. Jones of Texas. And the issue, according to officials involved in the process of picking the next justice of the Supreme Court, was not abortion, but politics--did President Bush want an ideological war or a smooth, non-disruptive confirmation process. The 68-hour-long process of picking a successor to retired Justice William J. Brennan Jr.
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NEWS
July 25, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the end, the decision came down to two candidates and one issue. The candidates were David H. Souter of New Hampshire and Edith H. Jones of Texas. And the issue, according to officials involved in the process of picking the next justice of the Supreme Court, was not abortion, but politics--did President Bush want an ideological war or a smooth, non-disruptive confirmation process. The 68-hour-long process of picking a successor to retired Justice William J. Brennan Jr.
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NEWS
October 27, 1987 | Associated Press
White House Chief of Staff Howard H. Baker Jr. on Monday presented Republican senators with names of 13 potential Supreme Court candidates in a fast-track effort that could produce a new nominee this week. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah), one of five senators at the meeting, confirmed that Baker's list began with 13, and said nine remained strong candidates at the end of the closed meeting but there were objections to the other four.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2003 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A longtime Texas death row inmate whose case became a symbol of problems with the state's capital punishment system because his lawyer slept through significant portions of the trial agreed to plead guilty to murder Thursday in return for three life sentences. Attorneys for Calvin J. Burdine, 50, said he was happy that he no longer faced execution, even though he probably will spend the rest of his life behind bars. "The shocking facts of Mr.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for a writer who has been jailed here for nearly a month argued in federal court Wednesday that she should not be compelled to hand over interviews she conducted for possible use in a crime book. "There has to be some balancing between law enforcement and the public's right to a free and independent press," said defense attorney Mike DeGuerin in arguing the 1st Amendment rights of Vanessa Leggett.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2005 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
When President Bush accepted Harriet E. Miers' withdrawal as a Supreme Court candidate Thursday, the air immediately filled with fresh advice. Republican lawmakers and conservative activists called on Bush to return to the model of his previous nominee -- new Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. -- and choose a conservative judge with stellar credentials and an intellectual bent. "He has to go strongly for credentials," Republican pollster David Winston said.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2005 | Thomas S. Mulligan and Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writers
A federal appeals court on Tuesday overturned a 24-year sentence handed to former Dynegy Inc. executive Jamie Olis, ruling that a lower court relied on an exaggerated figure for investor losses directly caused by the fraud that Olis oversaw.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal appeals court on Wednesday set aside a ruling that a defendant in a Texas capital murder trial does not have an absolute right to an attorney who stays awake at trial. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans will consider ordering a new trial for Calvin J. Burdine, whose death sentence for a 1983 Texas murder drew much negative attention to that state's death penalty system.
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, the nation's oldest chief executive, has appointed the youngest set of federal appeals court judges in American history during his second term. According to data published by the American Bar Assn., more than one-third of Reagan's appeals court nominees since 1985 have been under 45, a percentage far higher than that of any of his predecessors.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A defendant in a capital murder trial does not have an absolute constitutional right to have an attorney who stays awake for the entire trial, a sharply divided federal appeals panel in New Orleans ruled Friday. The ruling came in the case of Calvin J. Burdine, whose death sentence for a 1983 murder in Texas drew considerable--and unfavorable--attention to that state's death penalty system.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
In the more than four years that George W. Bush has been president, Wisconsin Sen. Herb Kohl has rarely received a call from the White House. But last week, the phone rang and the low-profile Democrat suddenly found himself on the line with Bush's chief counsel, Harriet Miers. Miers is leading the White House effort to fill the current Supreme Court vacancy.
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