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Edith R Perez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One grew up in a family of immigrant farm workers, made Phi Beta Kappa at UC Davis, worked on the California Law Review at UC's Boalt Hall and now is a partner in a prominent Downtown law firm. The other once clerked for a U.S. Supreme Court justice, serves on the boards of the Legal Aid Foundation and the Constitutional Rights Foundation, and played a key role in the Christopher Commission study that led to Police Department reforms in the wake of the 1991 Rodney G. King beating.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Edith R. Perez will not be reappointed to another five-year term on the panel, and aides to Mayor Richard Riordan are searching for her replacement, officials confirmed Tuesday. Saying "it's time to hand the baton off to someone else," Kelly Martin, the mayor's chief of staff, said Riordan would not reappoint Perez when her term expires June 30.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1995
After weeks of mulling scores of possibilities, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan is scheduled to announce today his choices for two vacant seats on the high-profile Police Commission. One of the closely held appointments is going to attorney Edith R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Edith Perez criticized one of the key elements of community-based policing Saturday, saying that the neighborhood councils meant to advise police have become "booster groups." Speaking to a gathering of South Los Angeles residents at USC, Perez said she is afraid that the concerns of some citizens are being overlooked by the councils, called Community-Police Advisory Boards.
OPINION
November 29, 1998
Mike Feuer's commentary ("Cut Ambiguity of Inspector General's Role," Nov. 19) reminds us that the role of the Police Commission is as a watchdog. Feuer points out that when an ordinance or charter amendment--or the Christopher Commission report--is unclear about accountability and responsibility, parties may differ on what the proper relationship should be. This issue is not about whether Chief Bernard Parks is doing a good job. Surely no chief has ever been a firmer disciplinarian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commissioner Edith R. Perez was unanimously elected president of the five-member civilian panel Tuesday and immediately unveiled an ambitious agenda aimed at improving the Police Department's morale, reducing crime, increasing officer accountability and pressing forward on key LAPD reforms. Perez, a 43-year-old real estate attorney, takes over from Commissioner Raymond C. Fisher, who is leaving the panel after being nominated for the No. 3 post in the U.S. Justice Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Edith R. Perez will not be reappointed to another five-year term on the panel, and aides to Mayor Richard Riordan are searching for her replacement, officials confirmed Tuesday. Saying "it's time to hand the baton off to someone else," Kelly Martin, the mayor's chief of staff, said Riordan would not reappoint Perez when her term expires June 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Edith Perez criticized one of the key elements of community-based policing Saturday, saying that the neighborhood councils meant to advise police have become "booster groups." Speaking to a gathering of South Los Angeles residents at USC, Perez said she is afraid that the concerns of some citizens are being overlooked by the councils, called Community-Police Advisory Boards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a back-room maneuver that raises new questions about the strained relationship between the Los Angeles Police Commission and its aggressive inspector general, sources said a police union official told his fellow board members that commission President Edith Perez had encouraged the union to attack the independent watchdog. "We discussed it, but we decided that we didn't want to be the pawns of the commission," said one union member who spoke on condition of anonymity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Edith Perez has restricted information on misconduct complaints available to the panel's inspector general, a step both the civilian watchdog and police reform experts regard as a sharp reduction of the position's powers. The new definition of the inspector general's authority--detailed in a memo signed by Perez and addressed to Chief Bernard C. Parks--represents an abrupt departure from recommendations advocated by the 1991 Christopher Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks, prominent police reform experts, particularly those invited to testify before the City Council and charter reform commissions, have been the targets of a mysterious, anonymous mailing campaign designed to enhance the Los Angeles Police Commission's image.
OPINION
November 29, 1998
Mike Feuer's commentary ("Cut Ambiguity of Inspector General's Role," Nov. 19) reminds us that the role of the Police Commission is as a watchdog. Feuer points out that when an ordinance or charter amendment--or the Christopher Commission report--is unclear about accountability and responsibility, parties may differ on what the proper relationship should be. This issue is not about whether Chief Bernard Parks is doing a good job. Surely no chief has ever been a firmer disciplinarian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Edith Perez has restricted information on misconduct complaints available to the panel's inspector general, a step both the civilian watchdog and police reform experts regard as a sharp reduction of the position's powers. The new definition of the inspector general's authority--detailed in a memo signed by Perez and addressed to Chief Bernard C. Parks--represents an abrupt departure from recommendations advocated by the 1991 Christopher Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to reappoint President Edith Perez to a second term, making her the first commission president in a decade to succeed herself in the civilian oversight body's top job. Vice President T. Warren Jackson also was unanimously reelected. Perez, who is admired for her tenacity but who has been criticized for exercising too little oversight since the board named Police Chief Bernard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a back-room maneuver that raises new questions about the strained relationship between the Los Angeles Police Commission and its aggressive inspector general, sources said a police union official told his fellow board members that commission President Edith Perez had encouraged the union to attack the independent watchdog. "We discussed it, but we decided that we didn't want to be the pawns of the commission," said one union member who spoke on condition of anonymity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commissioner Edith R. Perez was unanimously elected president of the five-member civilian panel Tuesday and immediately unveiled an ambitious agenda aimed at improving the Police Department's morale, reducing crime, increasing officer accountability and pressing forward on key LAPD reforms. Perez, a 43-year-old real estate attorney, takes over from Commissioner Raymond C. Fisher, who is leaving the panel after being nominated for the No. 3 post in the U.S. Justice Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks, prominent police reform experts, particularly those invited to testify before the City Council and charter reform commissions, have been the targets of a mysterious, anonymous mailing campaign designed to enhance the Los Angeles Police Commission's image.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to reappoint President Edith Perez to a second term, making her the first commission president in a decade to succeed herself in the civilian oversight body's top job. Vice President T. Warren Jackson also was unanimously reelected. Perez, who is admired for her tenacity but who has been criticized for exercising too little oversight since the board named Police Chief Bernard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One grew up in a family of immigrant farm workers, made Phi Beta Kappa at UC Davis, worked on the California Law Review at UC's Boalt Hall and now is a partner in a prominent Downtown law firm. The other once clerked for a U.S. Supreme Court justice, serves on the boards of the Legal Aid Foundation and the Constitutional Rights Foundation, and played a key role in the Christopher Commission study that led to Police Department reforms in the wake of the 1991 Rodney G. King beating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1995
After weeks of mulling scores of possibilities, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan is scheduled to announce today his choices for two vacant seats on the high-profile Police Commission. One of the closely held appointments is going to attorney Edith R.
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