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WORLD
February 15, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
As the Russian presidential race enters its final weeks, a radio station considered one of the country's few stalwarts of free speech is facing orders from its government-owned parent company to reshuffle management, officials said Tuesday. The Echo of Moscow station, which is often critical of the government, is expected to lose editor in chief Alexei Venediktov, his first deputy, Vladimir Varfolomeyev, and at least two other key members of its board of directors in late March, leaving a pro-Kremlin majority on the board, station officials and media experts said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Warning: This editorial may upset you," Editorial, March 31 The Times claims, "The latest attack on academic freedom comes not from government authorities or corporate pressure but from students. " That is completely ridiculous. The Times needs to show some real sensitivity to those who suffer every day from post-traumatic stress disorder. You can't even begin to fathom what it's like to live through a traumatic experience that causes these issues. Every member of the editorial board should make it a point to talk to people who have PTSD and gain some critical perspective.
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NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
What is it like to be brutally raped for four hours? In a prison, no less, where there are supposed to be guards maintaining order and facilitating rehabilitation? A young inmate at the East Mississippi Correctional Facility bravely shared his rape story with the ACLU in a handwritten letter currently making the rounds online. (His identity has been blocked out.) In it, he says he was held hostage in a prison cell. “I was beat brutally and faced several facial and rectum injuries from this attack,” he writes.
NEWS
March 26, 2014
Jim Newton is editor at large of the Los Angeles Times. He serves as a member of The Times' editorial board, advises on editorial matters and writes and edits for the editorial page and Op-Ed, including a weekly column examining the policy and politics of Southern California. Previously, he served as editor of the editorial pages, supervising the editorial board and overseeing its work as well as the Op-Ed page, Sunday Opinion and letters to the editor.  A veteran of the Los Angeles Times, he has worked as a reporter, editor and bureau chief and has covered, among other beats, the Los Angeles Police Department, the administration of Mayor Richard Riordan, federal law enforcement and state and local politics.  Newton came to the Los Angeles Times in 1989, having previously worked as a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and as a clerk at the New York Times, where he served as columnist James Reston's assistant from 1985-86.
OPINION
November 22, 2012
Along with giving thanks for making it to another Thanksgiving Day, The Times' editorial board is grateful that: The 2012 elections are finally over. And that after the June presidential primary, the November general election, this coming March's mayoral primary and the May runoff, we in Los Angeles will be able to go a year without an election. With the $4-billion sale of Lucasfilm to Walt Disney Co., the "Star Wars" franchise's future is secured and a seventh feature film is in the works.
OPINION
November 26, 2011
The Times' Nov. 23 editorial, "Clueless candidates," which criticized Newt Gingrich for his call to loosen child labor laws and allow kids to work as janitors at their schools, prompted reader Mike Gallagher to write the following defense of the former House speaker's proposal: "I can only assume that the editor did not work as a child, unlike the children of most small-business owners. I've never known a working kid who didn't have time for homework, so long as there wasn't a long transportation requirement.
OPINION
November 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
One hundred and fifty years ago, with the country still torn by civil war, President Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for all Americans to observe a common day "of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. " That's when Thanksgiving evolved from a holiday celebrated by states and the federal government on their own timetables into a national one held on the fourth Thursday of every November. We are far less divided as a country now than we were in Lincoln's day, but we're still split sharply, even bitterly, on some major issues.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
Cursive handwriting - when is the last time you used it to write something other than your signature? With so much of our lives online now, the occasions to get out the pen and paper are getting fewer and fewer. And even when we do, do we need to write in connected letters? That's under debate right now as some states work to ensure cursive is still taught in the classroom. Some of the 45 states that have adopted the Common Core - a set of K-12 public school course offerings that don't include penmanship classes - want to make sure cursive is still a required course.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Jon Healey
This week's riveting scoops in the Guardian and the Washington Post about the data-grabbing driftnet the National Security Agency has cast over the phone networks and the Internet drew hostile fire from four of the country's five largest newspapers, and a spirited defense from the fifth. The disagreement highlights the fact that there really are pros and cons to government surveillance, and there's no clear red line to alert the public when it's time to worry about the liberties they may be losing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2012 | By Deirdre Edgar
On Sunday, the Los Angeles Times' editorial board endorsed President Obama for reelection. Not surprisingly, the action has drawn hundreds of comments from readers who agreed or disagreed with the endorsement. But a third group of readers questioned the very idea of an endorsement. And many thought that the Obama recommendation indicated a bias in news coverage. Elizabeth Denny of Orange was one such reader. "I do not subscribe to the L.A. Times to hear about your political point of view," she emailed.
OPINION
November 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
One hundred and fifty years ago, with the country still torn by civil war, President Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for all Americans to observe a common day "of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. " That's when Thanksgiving evolved from a holiday celebrated by states and the federal government on their own timetables into a national one held on the fourth Thursday of every November. We are far less divided as a country now than we were in Lincoln's day, but we're still split sharply, even bitterly, on some major issues.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
Cursive handwriting - when is the last time you used it to write something other than your signature? With so much of our lives online now, the occasions to get out the pen and paper are getting fewer and fewer. And even when we do, do we need to write in connected letters? That's under debate right now as some states work to ensure cursive is still taught in the classroom. Some of the 45 states that have adopted the Common Core - a set of K-12 public school course offerings that don't include penmanship classes - want to make sure cursive is still a required course.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The Times' editorial Friday about insurance policy cancellations struck a nerve with many readers, who objected both to what it said and what it didn't say. On the latter front, the editorial board wrote that President Obama "overpromised" when he pledged, repeatedly, that the new law wouldn't force anyone who liked their insurance plan to change it. Wrong, wrote "RicoPanadero," in words shared by many other commenters. "The president did not overpromise. The president lied," "RicoPanadero" wrote.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Back when the Houston Chronicle endorsed GOP candidate Ted Cruz to represent Texas in the U.S. Senate, it largely expressed admiration for his Democratic opponent, whom it seems not to have supported mainly on the grounds that he didn't have a lot of campaign support and obviously wouldn't win. This week, the newspaper has drawn national attention - a mix of praise and scorn - for a new  editorial that has been described as a withdrawal of...
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Pride, it is said, goeth before a fall. Now come the recriminations. Repeated national surveys have shown public support for the Republican Party tanking since GOP lawmakers banded together to shut down the federal government and bring the U.S. to the brink of financial default. On a more personal level, Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah, one of the highest-profile supporters of the impasse, has seen his appproval ratings plunge at home - a conservative stronghold that delivered President Obama a mere 25% of the vote in 2012.  Now, in a rare statement of second thoughts, the hometown newspaper of Republican Texas Sen. Ted Cruz has expressed its regrets for endorsing him a year ago. Cruz was one of the chief architects of the impasse.
OPINION
September 7, 2013
Editing a letters page provides some insight into the random topics that push hot buttons you didn't know existed. While most of the commentary sent to letters@latimes.com focuses on the big-item issues of the day (a possible military strike on Syria drew the most letters for the second week in a row), occasionally a less weighty subject will prompt impassioned responses. For example, cursive. Reacting to The Times' editorial Wednesday warning that the "handwriting may be on the wall" for cursive instruction in schools, nearly a dozen readers rose to script's defense.
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Warning: This editorial may upset you," Editorial, March 31 The Times claims, "The latest attack on academic freedom comes not from government authorities or corporate pressure but from students. " That is completely ridiculous. The Times needs to show some real sensitivity to those who suffer every day from post-traumatic stress disorder. You can't even begin to fathom what it's like to live through a traumatic experience that causes these issues. Every member of the editorial board should make it a point to talk to people who have PTSD and gain some critical perspective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2001 | From Associated Press
John Oakes, the editorial page editor of the New York Times who developed the modern op-ed page format by inviting opinion pieces from people outside the newsroom, died Thursday of complications from a stroke. He was 87. Oakes, who guided the editorial page for 15 years during the Vietnam War and the Watergate era, died at Mt. Sinai Medical Center, said his daughter, Andra.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Karin Klein and Jon Healey
Lose cred now. Ask him how. Former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is going to work for Herbalife, the much-maligned company that pitches dietary supplements to people eager to be as trim as, well, the former mayor. It also happens to be fighting allegations that the company's multi-level marketing plan is actually a pyramid scheme.  We're almost speechless. Almost. Herbalife's less-than-sterling reputation is an odd thing for a erstwhile top city official to associate his name with, especially if he has any remaining political ambitions, as Villaraigosa certainly had at some point.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Are some atrocities worse than others? Or, is dead just dead? This week, Syrian opposition forces claimed that the government of Bashar Assad had used chemical weapons against its own people, killing scores -- men, women and children -- in a Damascus suburb. If true, The Times' editorial board argued Friday, the United States can no longer just stand by and watch: But if chemical weapons are now being used on a major scale against civilians, the U.S. must act - ideally in concert with other nations.
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