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OPINION
March 12, 2008
Everybody loves a good political sex scandal — the ritual apologies, the jokes, the schadenfreude, the self-righteousness (from everyone else, of course). But The Times editorial boards of old tended to stay out of the graphic, cheeky media hype , refusing to opine on some of the most lascivious of political tales — from 1970s prostitution stings, the 1983 congressional page corruption, to Larry Craig's quasi-outing last year. When it did pronounce on the lewdness of our elected officials, the board's tone ranged from disappointed to dismissive as it strove to put sex scandals in the context of their wider political relevance, whether as part of wider corruption or crimes, a character flaw in a major leader, or as a reason for some meta media and political analysis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Wednesday, conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court continued their project of undermining reasonable attempts by Congress to limit the corrupting influence of money in election campaigns. The same 5-4 majority that lifted limits on corporate political spending in the Citizens United decision struck down long-standing limits on the total amount a citizen can donate during an election cycle. As in Citizens United, the majority held that the restrictions violated 1st Amendment protections for political speech.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2010 | By Ann M. Simmons
Los Angeles Times editorial writer Robert Greene has been awarded this year's Walker Stone Award for "outstanding achievement in editorial writing," the Scripps Howard Foundation announced Friday. The award is one of several accolades presented by the foundation each year to honor "the best work in the communications industry and journalism education." Greene received the award for editorials he wrote in 2009. "I was very excited and I felt honored and humbled," Greene said after learning of the honor.
NEWS
March 26, 2014
Nicholas Goldberg joined the Los Angeles Times in 2002 as editor of the op-ed page and the Sunday Opinion section. He became deputy editor of the editorial pages in 2008 and a year later was named editor of the editorial pages.  He is a former reporter and editor at Newsday in New York, where he worked as Middle East bureau chief from 1995 to 1998. In that job, he covered the Israeli-Palestinian peace process; presidential elections in Iran; arms monitoring in Iraq; famine in Sudan; civil war in Algeria; war in Lebanon and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism in Saudi Arabia.  Goldberg also covered the 1992 presidential campaign of Bill Clinton, and as statehouse bureau chief in New York, the administrations of Governors Mario Cuomo and George Pataki.
OPINION
April 7, 1985
I very much enjoyed David Shaw's series (March 24-25-26) on the behind-the-scenes practices of some of the great newspapers of our country. For me, the editorials, letters to the editor, opinion page, are the icing on the cake. To digress briefly: Since arriving in California less than a year ago I was happy to find East Coast liberalism in your editorials and your pages. However, some months ago I noticed a change. Your columnists are now on the conservative side. Is this a permanent change?
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | President Bush's nomination of Robert M. Gates to be director of the Central Intelligence Agency has sparked a vigorous debate in the nation's editorial pages. Here is a sampling: and
ROBERT GATES--WRONG CHOICE FOR CIA: The Senate Intelligence Committee should recommend against confirmation of Mr. Gates to lead the CIA. The times demand a massive rethinking of the country's intelligence mission. It stretches the imagination to believe that Mr. Gates, the ultimate Old Guard insider, is the right person to do the intelligence work of the post-Cold War era. --The St. Paul (Minn.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | Democrat Harris Wofford's victory over former Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh in last week's Pennsylvania senatorial race has "sent a message"--to President Bush and to political leaders in both parties--about the mood of the electorate. Here is a sampling of editorial opinion from newspapers around the country about the voters' concerns on the economy and other key issues:
WOFFORD MANDATE: MIDDLE CLASS DEMANDS RECOGNITION: If Wofford's victory represents a wake-up call for America, as we think it does, it is one directed at incumbents who have spent too long feeding at the public trough and have lost touch with the day-to-day struggle most Americans face raising a family and paying the bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999
The Times has won the first-place 1999 Aaron Price Award for its series of stories, "Failure to Provide: Los Angeles County's Child Support Crisis," published last fall. The paper also won a third-place Aaron Price Award for editorials titled "A Health Gain for Kids" and "Lagging Health Insurance Effort."
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | Associated Press
The Philadelphia Inquirer, stung by charges of racism over an editorial suggesting that more poor women should use contraceptives, will take the unusual step of publishing an apology in its Sunday editions. "I think maybe the best thing to say about it now is it is an apology and it's a change of position," Inquirer Editor Maxwell E. P. King said Friday. The Inquirer printed an editorial on Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Michael Newman, staff editor of the New York Times' Op-Ed page, has been named deputy editorial page editor of the Los Angeles Times, it was announced Monday. Newman, 39, will be a member of the editorial board, which determines the editorial page positions of the Los Angeles Times. "As one of the most talented journalists in the country, Michael is a terrific addition to our team," said Andres Martinez, editor of the editorial page.
OPINION
March 13, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It might be sound reasoning, but a Supreme Court decision this week on an arcane legal-easement argument will likely have broad and regrettable consequences, particularly in the West, for the national movement to convert old railroad beds into bicycle paths. The case, Brandt vs. U.S., is rooted in the General Railroad Right of Way Law of 1875, through which Congress established a uniform approach to granting easements on government land so railroad companies could extend tracks through the heart of the still-developing country.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Let's start by calling "student success fees" what they really are - thinly disguised tuition increases charged to students for basic educational services. These fees, which are being levied at many California State University campuses, can cost up to $1,000 a year, on top of the official tuition, which has nearly doubled since 2007 to about $5,500. Not counting room or board. Because Gov. Jerry Brown's 2014-15 budget would increase state funding by more than $140 million, Cal State has agreed to freeze tuition.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
For more than a quarter of a century, investors have been able to bring class-action lawsuits against companies that have fraudulently inflated their stock prices without having to prove that each buyer of the stock had been individually duped. Now, industrial giant Halliburton Co. is trying to persuade the Supreme Court to make such lawsuits significantly harder, if not impossible, to bring. That would be a fantastic result for publicly traded companies, but a terrible one for the average investor.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Secretary of State John F. Kerry is right: Russia's deployment of troops in Crimea is an "incredible act of aggression" that violates express promises Russia made two decades ago to respect Ukraine's territorial integrity. If Russia doesn't reverse course, the United States and countries in Europe should impose economic sanctions. But even as they weigh such measures, the United States and its allies must be willing to show Russia that its concerns can be resolved, in Kerry's words, "according to the standards of the 21st century.
OPINION
February 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The six state attorneys general who have declined to defend their states' bans on same-sex marriage in court got some encouragement this week from U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. In a speech to the National Assn. of Attorneys General, Holder said that it was sometimes appropriate for attorneys general to abandon their usual obligation to defend the constitutionality of state laws. This page supports same-sex marriage unreservedly. But even so, we worry that Holder's comments will embolden additional state attorneys general - Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives - to pick and choose which of their states' laws they will defend in court.
OPINION
February 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The sudden collapse of the Mt. Gox bitcoin exchange Tuesday demonstrated to the public just how risky the virtual currency can be. Prosecutors have rushed to investigate, and regulators in the U.S. and Japan, where Mt. Gox was based, are mulling how to extend their purview to bitcoin trades. One senator even called for a ban on the currency. Investors, however, have long been keenly aware of the perils associated with the volatile commodity. While the currency is in its infancy, those with little appetite for risk should stay away.
OPINION
April 16, 2010
Earlier this week, Arizona lawmakers passed anti-immigration legislation that is unique in its stringency and harshness. The bill would strongly encourage police officers to engage in racial profiling by ordering them to check the status of people they merely suspect suspect of being in the U.S. illegally. Even legal immigrants, in a move that harks back to fascist Europe, would be required to carry their papers at all times or risk arrest. Apparently Arizona legislators have forgotten Proposition 187, the 1994 California ballot initiative.
OPINION
February 21, 2014
After a weeklong stay, the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix sent me on my way on Jan. 5 with five stitches, a titanium alloy plate in my neck and a hard plastic Össur Miami J cervical collar that will remain on my neck until late March. A few weeks later, I learned what I'd been charged for the Miami J: $447. Had I been given the chance, I could have purchased the brace online for less than $100. Allowing that sort of comparison shopping is one small thing policymakers could do to slow the growth of healthcare spending.
OPINION
February 14, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As if the 405 Freeway hasn't broken our hearts and made us weep enough in the four years it's been under construction, it's now poised to make us miserable on Valentine's Day night and Presidents Day weekend. At 10 p.m. Friday, workers will start closing onramps and offramps, and by 1 a.m. Saturday, all lanes on the northbound 405 between Getty Center Drive and Ventura Boulevard will be shut down, making this no freeway of love for romantic revelers. Over the next 80 hours, three out of five lanes will be closed during the day and all five will be closed late at night.
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