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OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Fifteen months ago, as the nation recoiled in horror from the massacre of 20 children and six adults by a mentally ill man armed with three semiautomatic weapons, there were firm proclamations that this time would be different. The violence at that Newtown, Conn., elementary school, it was said, would finally lead the nation to come together and embrace some reasonable gun control laws. Well, that didn't last long. If anything, the national gun frenzy, fueled by the irresponsible lobbyists at the National Rifle Assn., has intensified.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It's hard to get executions right. This week, the Supreme Court denied appeals by Louisiana and Missouri death row inmates who argued that they were entitled to know the source of the drugs with which they are to be executed, and that denial of that information compromises their right to due process. It's unclear why the court refused to hear the cases, but the underlying argument remains potent. Another challenge is underway in Oklahoma, where two inmates are seeking stays of execution because state officials have revised protocols on the fly as the lethal drugs they usually use have become more difficult to obtain.
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OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Alzheimer's disease and other dementias not only destroy the lives of those who suffer from them but take a devastating toll on family caregivers and on those who must pay the cost of care. An estimated 5 million people in the United States suffer from Alzheimer's. But that number will increase exponentially in the years ahead because of what Robin Barr, a senior official at the National Institute on Aging, calls "an aging tsunami. " A highly cited published research analysis estimates that the number of people with Alzheimer's around the world will jump from 36 million today to 115 million by 2050.
REAL ESTATE
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
More than a year after it approved a report critical of the CIA's interrogation and detention policies, the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to make a portion of the document public. It's now up to President Obama to ensure that the agency doesn't mount a rear-guard attempt to censor or sanitize the committee's findings in the name of national security. Thanks to news reports and a report by the CIA's inspector general, Americans long have been aware of both the broad outlines and some abhorrent details of the Bush administration's mistreatment of suspected terrorists after 9/11.
OPINION
February 9, 2011
Abortion-rights supporters breathed a sigh of relief last week when a troubling word was removed from a controversial antiabortion bill. They shouldn't have. This piece of congressional legislation and a related bill are still loaded with harmful provisions that would turn back the clock on women's rights to make their own medical decisions. FOR THE RECORD: Abortion: A Feb. 9 editorial about a proposed antiabortion bill in Congress said that some Roman Catholic hospitals object to abortion.
OPINION
October 22, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
As human understanding of elephants has evolved, so has our treatment of them. Zoos decades ago freed these largest of land mammals from standing for hours in chains on arthritis-inducing concrete. Also gone from many zoos is the bullhook, an instrument that resembles a fireplace poker that is used to poke, prod or strike an elephant. Although the blunt end can be used as a lead for an elephant, the sharp end makes it a tool of coercion. The Los Angeles Zoo stopped using the bullhook in any manner in 2010.
OPINION
March 12, 2008
Everybody loves a good political sex scandal — the ritual apologies, the jokes, the schadenfreude, the self-righteousness (from everyone else, of course). But The Times editorial boards of old tended to stay out of the graphic, cheeky media hype , refusing to opine on some of the most lascivious of political tales — from 1970s prostitution stings, the 1983 congressional page corruption, to Larry Craig's quasi-outing last year. When it did pronounce on the lewdness of our elected officials, the board's tone ranged from disappointed to dismissive as it strove to put sex scandals in the context of their wider political relevance, whether as part of wider corruption or crimes, a character flaw in a major leader, or as a reason for some meta media and political analysis.
OPINION
September 1, 2011
It was a natural reaction after 9/11: Protect the nation at any cost. But a survey of homeland security projects by Times staff writer Kim Murphy reveals that the "any cost" rationale has resulted in unnecessary and eccentric responses to the possibility of a terrorist act. Congress should block such projects in the future. For example, Murphy told of a grant for anti-terrorism equipment to a county in Nebraska, which received thousands of dollars for cattle nose leads, halters and electric prods — in case terrorists waged biological warfare against cows.
OPINION
April 1, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
There's a new tone in the latest report on climate change from the United Nations' expert organization on the subject. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change doesn't just forecast the usual sweeping changes that are likely to occur as the planet warms, the kinds of warnings the public has heard (and often ignored) for decades. The report released Sunday goes further by pointing out alarming signs of what is happening already. In a rational world, it would be more than enough to propel world leaders into action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2010 | By Ann M. Simmons
Los Angeles Times editorial writer Robert Greene has been awarded this year's Walker Stone Award for "outstanding achievement in editorial writing," the Scripps Howard Foundation announced Friday. The award is one of several accolades presented by the foundation each year to honor "the best work in the communications industry and journalism education." Greene received the award for editorials he wrote in 2009. "I was very excited and I felt honored and humbled," Greene said after learning of the honor.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A story line has developed during Mayor Eric Garcetti's first nine months on the job, and it goes something like this: In stark contrast to his predecessor, Antonio Villaraigosa, who often held multiple news conferences a day and launched big initiatives, Garcetti has taken such a low-profile, behind-the-scenes approach that people wonder what he'll have to show for his first year in office. Though Garcetti hasn't avoided the limelight - he was on stage last week with former President Clinton, for instance - he often goes days without a public event, and he hasn't yet proposed a major program or policy change.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
No one should have expected that putting more vegetables in front of elementary school students would instantly turn them into an army of broccoli fans. Plenty of food has been thrown out since new federal rules took effect in 2011 requiring students in the subsidized school lunch program to choose a fruit or vegetable each day. Nevertheless, studies find that continued exposure to produce is resulting in more children eating at least some of it. That's worth a certain amount of wasted food.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The lives of captive killer whales are nothing like those of their wild counterparts. Instead of roaming for miles every day in close-knit family groups, captive whales perform for audiences in tanks that, though roomier than those of early marine parks, are far too small for such large ocean predators. In the wild, killer whales have not been known to kill humans or one another. The same cannot be said for the whales in amusement parks around the world, even though they represent only about a tenth of a percent of the numbers in the wild.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
What the homeless need most is permanent supportive housing. Not shelter beds, not handouts or the occasional hot meal. They need housing in a building or complex that offers the services they require - substance-abuse treatment, mental health counseling, job placement - to help them address the myriad issues that left them living on the streets in the first place. The goal of such housing is to enable them to live as independently as possible while supporting them in their efforts to make a successful transition into a stable life.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are typically reelected every four years with token opposition at most, and in former days they explained away this phenomenon by arguing that voters were so satisfied with their performance that there was a general consensus that things were going well. The lack of serious challengers, they asserted, was proof that democracy was working. That argument is so twisted as to need little serious discussion. Supervisors are consistently reelected in this county of more than 10 million people because it's nearly impossible to unseat them regardless of their performance.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Nine months after Egypt's armed forces overthrew the country's democratically elected president, the leader of that coup has announced that he will seek the presidency in elections next month. But even if army chief Gen. Abdel Fattah Sisi receives an overwhelming mandate from voters, he won't be able to restore prosperity and stability to the country if the government continues to repress and imprison political opponents. The United States should use its limited but real influence with Egypt to press Sisi to abandon his siege mentality and open a dialogue with opposition groups.
OPINION
September 4, 2012
And now a pop quiz, in honor of the 231st birthday of the city of Los Angeles: What's the oldest building in the city? Is it Mission San Gabriel Arcangel? It's true that this is the spot from which the Pobladores set out in 1781 to establish their city (the padres had earlier built their mission near what is now Montebello but later abandoned the site as unsuitable). Each Labor Day weekend, dignitaries, descendants of the founders and other celebrants retrace those early steps as best they can by walking from the mission southwest on Mission Road, Alhambra Avenue and Valley Boulevard, past Lincoln Park, over the river and to the plaza near Olvera Street.
OPINION
April 7, 1985
I very much enjoyed David Shaw's series (March 24-25-26) on the behind-the-scenes practices of some of the great newspapers of our country. For me, the editorials, letters to the editor, opinion page, are the icing on the cake. To digress briefly: Since arriving in California less than a year ago I was happy to find East Coast liberalism in your editorials and your pages. However, some months ago I noticed a change. Your columnists are now on the conservative side. Is this a permanent change?
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Wednesday, conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court continued their project of undermining reasonable attempts by Congress to limit the corrupting influence of money in election campaigns. The same 5-4 majority that lifted limits on corporate political spending in the Citizens United decision struck down long-standing limits on the total amount a citizen can donate during an election cycle. As in Citizens United, the majority held that the restrictions violated 1st Amendment protections for political speech.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, you'll pass an industrial complex where General Dynamics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photograph, you just might find yourself detained by military police, have your camera confiscated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the 1st Amendment and common sense. According to the Blade, staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-area factory and decided to take photos of other businesses for future use, a common media practice.
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