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OPINION
December 27, 2012
The prospect of recovery-killing across-the-board tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year hasn't been enough to spur lawmakers to craft a plan to avert those changes. The onus for Congress' inaction falls squarely on House Republicans, whose refusal last week to follow their own leadership has quashed just about any hope of a "grand bargain" with President Obama to address the federal government's long-term fiscal woes. The main hope now is that lawmakers will find a way out of the impasse before the damage to the economy gets much worse.
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OPINION
December 12, 2012
Nothing exposes partisan hypocrisy quite like the filibuster, that irksome parliamentary rule that allows a minority of U.S. senators to block legislation, judicial appointments and other business by requiring a 60-vote majority to proceed to a vote. Almost invariably, the party in power considers the filibuster to be an enemy of progress that must be squashed, while the minority fights to preserve it at all cost. That the same players often find themselves arguing from opposite sides depending on whether they control the Senate or are in the minority hardly seems to trouble most lawmakers.
OPINION
November 27, 2012
A debate over taxing and spending appeared to be brewing in next year's Los Angeles city elections, with voters first being asked whether to boost the sales tax by half a cent on the dollar to help close a budget gap and, two months later, whether to trim pensions for city workers. Never mind the second part. With former Mayor Richard Riordan on Monday suspending his effort to put the pension measure on the May 21 ballot, voters will now get to decide whether to pay more but not whether to ask the city to pay less.
OPINION
November 22, 2012
Along with giving thanks for making it to another Thanksgiving Day, The Times' editorial board is grateful that: The 2012 elections are finally over. And that after the June presidential primary, the November general election, this coming March's mayoral primary and the May runoff, we in Los Angeles will be able to go a year without an election. With the $4-billion sale of Lucasfilm to Walt Disney Co., the "Star Wars" franchise's future is secured and a seventh feature film is in the works.
OPINION
November 20, 2012
Washington's focus on the "fiscal cliff" - a potentially disastrous combination of tax hikes and spending cuts scheduled to go into effect Jan. 1 - has shifted attention away from the biggest problem in the economy, which is the more than 12 million Americans still unemployed. More than 5 million of them have been sidelined for more than half a year, which means they're no longer receiving unemployment insurance benefits from their state. Instead, many are receiving extended unemployment benefits paid for by the federal government.
OPINION
November 10, 2012
Several readers who disagreed with The Times' Monday editorial , which expressed concern over priests who made political statements from the pulpit before Tuesday's vote, noted that the same day's paper published a photo of Gov. Jerry Brown in the pews of a South L.A. church campaigning for Proposition 30. In a letter Tuesday, Robert S. Rodgers of Culver City asked: "Do the editors approve of Democrats going to churches to push for their causes...
OPINION
November 9, 2012
It wasn't exactly a Kumbaya moment, but top congressional Republicans offered Wednesday to meet the president halfway when it comes to solving the government's fiscal woes. In fact, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said he would support a tax code overhaul that raised more revenue - an apparent departure from the House GOP's no-new-taxes orthodoxy. There's an opportunity here for President Obama to finally obtain the "grand bargain" he's been talking about for years, a deal that brings the federal deficit and debt under control by cutting spending, slowing the growth of entitlements and, yes, raising revenue.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Editorial boards across the nation weighed in with their endorsements for president in the weeks leading up to the Nov. 6 election. The Opinion L.A. blog rounded up a few of these political endorsements to show the range in support for President Obama versus the enthusiasm for Republican challenger Mitt Romney. Now that the election is finally -- mercifully! -- over and Obama has won reelection, here's a look at what many of those editorial boards were saying Wednesday. Detroit Free Press, which endorsed Obama, writes : The next four years will belong not to the party that prevailed in Tuesday's presidential election, but to those grown-ups in each party who find ways to engage their opponents in addressing the still-looming problems of 2008: How to grow the employment without ballooning the national debt; how to simplify taxes without exacerbating tax inequities; how to control entitlement costs; and how to end the costly impasse over immigration.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Do endorsements for president still matter? Ed Morrissey of Hot Air and the Week recently wrote that “newspaper endorsements are at best meaningless anachronisms.” He argued that in today's information age, “news consumers consider themselves more informed than their local editorial board, and their own perspective as more valuable, especially as they progress from formerly low-information voters to sophisticated followers of current events.”...
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