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OPINION
November 13, 2012
This editorial has been updated, as indicated below. The trustees of California State University did the right thing Tuesday by putting off any discussion of new fees designed to keep students from using more than their share of university resources. Now the university should scrap the plan altogether and start over. There are more equitable and more effective ways to accomplish their goal. It's not the first time the board of trustees has been scheduled to vote on an ill-conceived plan before the students, faculty and the public have had a chance to weigh in. Administrators said the fees weren't about bringing in new income but rather were intended to change student behavior.
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OPINION
November 10, 2012
Several readers who disagreed with The Times' Monday editorial , which expressed concern over priests who made political statements from the pulpit before Tuesday's vote, noted that the same day's paper published a photo of Gov. Jerry Brown in the pews of a South L.A. church campaigning for Proposition 30. In a letter Tuesday, Robert S. Rodgers of Culver City asked: "Do the editors approve of Democrats going to churches to push for their causes...
OPINION
November 9, 2012
It wasn't exactly a Kumbaya moment, but top congressional Republicans offered Wednesday to meet the president halfway when it comes to solving the government's fiscal woes. In fact, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said he would support a tax code overhaul that raised more revenue - an apparent departure from the House GOP's no-new-taxes orthodoxy. There's an opportunity here for President Obama to finally obtain the "grand bargain" he's been talking about for years, a deal that brings the federal deficit and debt under control by cutting spending, slowing the growth of entitlements and, yes, raising revenue.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Editorial boards across the nation weighed in with their endorsements for president in the weeks leading up to the Nov. 6 election. The Opinion L.A. blog rounded up a few of these political endorsements to show the range in support for President Obama versus the enthusiasm for Republican challenger Mitt Romney. Now that the election is finally -- mercifully! -- over and Obama has won reelection, here's a look at what many of those editorial boards were saying Wednesday. Detroit Free Press, which endorsed Obama, writes : The next four years will belong not to the party that prevailed in Tuesday's presidential election, but to those grown-ups in each party who find ways to engage their opponents in addressing the still-looming problems of 2008: How to grow the employment without ballooning the national debt; how to simplify taxes without exacerbating tax inequities; how to control entitlement costs; and how to end the costly impasse over immigration.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Do endorsements for president still matter? Ed Morrissey of Hot Air and the Week recently wrote that “newspaper endorsements are at best meaningless anachronisms.” He argued that in today's information age, “news consumers consider themselves more informed than their local editorial board, and their own perspective as more valuable, especially as they progress from formerly low-information voters to sophisticated followers of current events.”...
OPINION
October 25, 2012
Mayor Villaraigosa, City Council, get a grip. Just because you don't like City Atty. Carmen Trutanich, that's no reason to ask voters to divide his office in two, taking away all his civil (as opposed to criminal) legal work and handing it to a separate, non-elected city lawyer. If the people don't like their city attorney or any of their other elected officials, they know what to do about it, and they can do it every four years. Various members of the council have tangled with Trutanich from the beginning of his tenure, and it's no wonder.
OPINION
October 1, 2012
There will be no suspense in the air Tuesday as the Los Angeles City Council prepares to vote a second and final time on two years of electricity rate hikes, just as there was no question a week ago that the council would approve the increase. Unlike other increases requested in recent years by the Department of Water and Power, there is virtually no play in these hikes. They are necessary. The council will adopt them, as it must. In recent years, higher rates were supposed to pay for a smart, environmentally crucial but voluntary move away from the coal-fired plants that provided decades of electricity on the cheap.
OPINION
September 25, 2012
The City Council on Tuesday will consider a sharp rollback in pensions for newly hired employees, offering them lower benefits with less financial help from the city. Unlike the reforms recently adopted in San Diego, San Jose and the state Legislature, the proposal the council is mulling wouldn't touch current employees' benefits. So in a way, it's solving a future problem, not the one the city faces right now. Nevertheless, if the city's pension benefits aren't sustainable, it doesn't make sense to offer them to the next generation of employees.
OPINION
September 21, 2012
The taxpayer bailouts of General Motors and Chrysler kept the companies afloat while they went through bankruptcy, averting liquidations that would have caused catastrophic job losses across the U.S. auto industry at the height of the recession. One consequence of the intervention, however, is that the government is still holding on to more than a fourth of GM's stock. The Treasury Department argues that the time isn't right to sell and that GM's shares are undervalued by the market.
OPINION
September 20, 2012
Two years ago, voters rejected an ill-conceived ballot measure that would have allowed auto insurers to offer discounts to people who had been covered by competing companies, but which would have done so at the expense of new drivers and those who had let their coverage lapse. Now, proponents of that measure are back with Proposition 33, a revised version that retains the fundamental flaws of the previous one. It was a bad idea two years ago; it's a bad idea now. Under the framework established by Proposition 103 in 1988, insurers base their rates mainly on an applicant's driving record, the number of miles driven and the years of driving experience.
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