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OPINION
November 9, 2012
It wasn't exactly a Kumbaya moment, but top congressional Republicans offered Wednesday to meet the president halfway when it comes to solving the government's fiscal woes. In fact, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said he would support a tax code overhaul that raised more revenue - an apparent departure from the House GOP's no-new-taxes orthodoxy. There's an opportunity here for President Obama to finally obtain the "grand bargain" he's been talking about for years, a deal that brings the federal deficit and debt under control by cutting spending, slowing the growth of entitlements and, yes, raising revenue.
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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Editorial boards across the nation weighed in with their endorsements for president in the weeks leading up to the Nov. 6 election. The Opinion L.A. blog rounded up a few of these political endorsements to show the range in support for President Obama versus the enthusiasm for Republican challenger Mitt Romney. Now that the election is finally -- mercifully! -- over and Obama has won reelection, here's a look at what many of those editorial boards were saying Wednesday. Detroit Free Press, which endorsed Obama, writes : The next four years will belong not to the party that prevailed in Tuesday's presidential election, but to those grown-ups in each party who find ways to engage their opponents in addressing the still-looming problems of 2008: How to grow the employment without ballooning the national debt; how to simplify taxes without exacerbating tax inequities; how to control entitlement costs; and how to end the costly impasse over immigration.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Do endorsements for president still matter? Ed Morrissey of Hot Air and the Week recently wrote that “newspaper endorsements are at best meaningless anachronisms.” He argued that in today's information age, “news consumers consider themselves more informed than their local editorial board, and their own perspective as more valuable, especially as they progress from formerly low-information voters to sophisticated followers of current events.”...
OPINION
October 25, 2012
Mayor Villaraigosa, City Council, get a grip. Just because you don't like City Atty. Carmen Trutanich, that's no reason to ask voters to divide his office in two, taking away all his civil (as opposed to criminal) legal work and handing it to a separate, non-elected city lawyer. If the people don't like their city attorney or any of their other elected officials, they know what to do about it, and they can do it every four years. Various members of the council have tangled with Trutanich from the beginning of his tenure, and it's no wonder.
OPINION
October 1, 2012
There will be no suspense in the air Tuesday as the Los Angeles City Council prepares to vote a second and final time on two years of electricity rate hikes, just as there was no question a week ago that the council would approve the increase. Unlike other increases requested in recent years by the Department of Water and Power, there is virtually no play in these hikes. They are necessary. The council will adopt them, as it must. In recent years, higher rates were supposed to pay for a smart, environmentally crucial but voluntary move away from the coal-fired plants that provided decades of electricity on the cheap.
OPINION
September 21, 2012
The taxpayer bailouts of General Motors and Chrysler kept the companies afloat while they went through bankruptcy, averting liquidations that would have caused catastrophic job losses across the U.S. auto industry at the height of the recession. One consequence of the intervention, however, is that the government is still holding on to more than a fourth of GM's stock. The Treasury Department argues that the time isn't right to sell and that GM's shares are undervalued by the market.
OPINION
September 12, 2012
In case anyone had forgotten, Moody's Investors Service issued a stark reminder Tuesday that the federal government is speeding headlong toward a political and financial cliff. On Jan. 1, a number of temporary tax cuts are due to expire just as new spending restraints kick in, pulling hundreds of billions of dollars out of the U.S. economy and potentially triggering another recession. At the same time, Washington is expected to reach the limit of its borrowing authority, necessitating another increase in its debt limit.
OPINION
September 9, 2012
Like the Republican convention that preceded it, the Democratic National Convention was a combination of infomercial, revival meeting (with former President Clinton in the role of evangelist in chief) and audition for rising political stars. Also like the Republican gathering, it was predictably longer on general pronouncements than on precise policy prescriptions. Still, the convention in Charlotte, N.C., effectively dramatized important differences between the two parties and their candidates.
OPINION
August 14, 2012
The Los Angeles Fire Department is run by a chief but overseen by a board of commissioners that, to do its job, must be able to delve deeply into the department's inner workings. It should have been unnecessary for the commissioners to go to voters, fire hats in hand, to ask to amend the city charter to make it even clearer that they had the authority to exercise their oversight. Yet in March 2009, that's just what they did when they sought approval of Proposition A to create the position of independent assessor, with the power to audit, assess and review the department's handling of complaints against employees.
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