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NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A woman who is a vice dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine today was named editor of the American Medical Assn.'s influential journal, the first female editor in its 116-year history. At a New York City news conference, Dr. Catherine D. De Angelis was introduced as editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., succeeding Dr. George Lundberg. Lundberg's firing in January provoked a controversy over the journal's editorial independence.
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NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A woman who is a vice dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine today was named editor of the American Medical Assn.'s influential journal, the first female editor in its 116-year history. At a New York City news conference, Dr. Catherine D. De Angelis was introduced as editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., succeeding Dr. George Lundberg. Lundberg's firing in January provoked a controversy over the journal's editorial independence.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly, women are taking charge of their financial futures either out of necessity or desire, according to Jan Kingaard, managing editor of an eight-page monthly publication called The Women's Investment Newsletter, published in Mission Viejo. Noting that women represent 43% of Americans with assets of $500,000 or more and make up 35% of the country's 51 million shareholders, Kingaard said it is time for women to become fiscally savvy.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly, women are taking charge of their financial futures either out of necessity or desire, according to Jan Kingaard, managing editor of an eight-page monthly publication called The Women's Investment Newsletter, published in Mission Viejo. Noting that women represent 43% of Americans with assets of $500,000 or more and make up 35% of the country's 51 million shareholders, Kingaard said it is time for women to become fiscally savvy.
NEWS
May 1, 1985 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
She was what was known as a "particular friend" in convent vernacular. An older nun, she was both teacher and inspiration to Nancy Manahan, who was at the time in her first year at the Maryknoll Missionary Sisters' Novitiate near St. Louis. Because talking was allowed only during restricted periods and preferring the company of one nun over the others was forbidden, Manahan said she often had to confess to two transgressions--breaking silence and having a particular friend.
NEWS
April 19, 1985 | BETTY GOODWIN, Times Staff Writer
His hair has whitened, but little else has changed in nearly a decade since John T. Molloy first told working women how to find success in a gray flannel suit. "The fact is, it's more true than ever," he says. "One of the problems women have if they get to the top is they fluff out. They wear conservative clothing for 10 promotions, then deny that they were tough as nails to get there and start dressing like Madame Bovary."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bleak assessment of female employment in Hollywood, two separate studies have concluded that women continue to lag significantly behind their male counterparts in key creative positions even as the movie and television industries enjoy boom times. The Directors Guild of America came out with a report this week showing that the number of days worked by female film directors fell from 8.
BOOKS
September 22, 2002 | JAMES E. CACCAVO, James E. Caccavo is a writer, photographer and former editor who worked in Vietnam from 1968 to 1970 for the Red Cross and Newsweek magazine. He is a trustee on the Indochina Media Memorial Foundation and a contributor to the Requiem book and exhibit project.
War is an equal opportunity abuser. It wounds or kills whomever it wants, whenever it wants, regardless of age or gender. But for women wanting to cover the war in Vietnam, the news media in the 1960s were not equal opportunity employers. Women covering the war were confronted with more than one adversary. Besides the North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong, women had to deal with discouraging attitudes from their employers and American military brass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1999 | DIANA ZUCKERMAN, Diana Zuckerman is executive director of the National Center for Policy Research for Women and Families
While news of a $3.2-billion breast implant settlement made front-page news this year, an equally important milestone passed unnoticed: For the first time, the makers of saline breast implants provided safety data to the Food and Drug Administration. The popularity of breast implants is at an all-time high--150,000 women received implants last year, most of which were saline.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | HENRY ALLEN, THE WASHINGTON POST
These are the three aristocrats of America's magazine erotica: Yellow Silk (50 pages, $7.50, circulation 15,000), Libido (88 pages, $8, circulation 9,000) and Paramour (36 pages, $4.95, circulation 12,000). Most of their staffs are women. Most of the readers are men. Small as they are, these magazines keep alive the great free-love Kinsey-kinky-Kama-Sutra love-oil rapture tradition of a century of bohemia and intelligentsia. A lot of readers are between 30 and 45, the editors say.
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antiques are being vetted and polished for the Los Angeles Antiques Show gala May 14. Last year's party was a wild success, with an attendance of 1,500 and more than $600,000 raised for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Women's Guild members Beverly Firestein and Susan W. Robertson are chairwomen. Honorary chairs are Anne and Kirk Douglas, and Veronique and Gregory Peck. The international show, organized by the Antique Dealers Assn.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
Through many years in the public eye, Hillary Clinton's image has evolved from that of a sharp-edged  campaigner, who in 1992 offended legions of women with her comments seeming to dismiss baking cookies, to the experienced stateswoman of today. New memos released Friday from Hillary and Bill Clinton's eight years in the White House chart the exhaustive work that went into crafting the first lady's image - revealing the advice Clinton received and the debate among her aides about how to help her as she embarked on a controversial attempt to transform the nation's healthcare system, as well as initiatives to draw attention to the rights of women and girls.
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