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Edmond O Brien

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April 10, 1988 | BRIDGET O'BRIEN
In the spring of 1955, I was almost 6. My younger sister, Maria, and I were just beginning our long career in Catholic school and our dad, Edmond O'Brien, was nominated for best supporting actor in "The Barefoot Contessa." One might say that Catholic school and the nomination made for diversified conversation that year. The weeks that followed the announcement of the nomination brought with it much excitement. My mom, Puerto Rican actress/dancer Olga San Juan, was busy looking at gown sketches.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988 | BRIDGET O'BRIEN
In the spring of 1955, I was almost 6. My younger sister, Maria, and I were just beginning our long career in Catholic school and our dad, Edmond O'Brien, was nominated for best supporting actor in "The Barefoot Contessa." One might say that Catholic school and the nomination made for diversified conversation that year. The weeks that followed the announcement of the nomination brought with it much excitement. My mom, Puerto Rican actress/dancer Olga San Juan, was busy looking at gown sketches.
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NEWS
May 9, 1985 | From Associated Press
Oscar-winning actor Edmond O'Brien, whose roles ranged from the original "1984" to "Julius Caesar," died at a sanitorium after a long bout with Alzheimer's disease, a spokesman announced today. He was 69. The New York-born O'Brien, who won the Academy Award in 1954 as best supporting actor for his portrayal of Hollywood press agent Oscar Muldoon in "The Barefoot Contessa," died at 9:30 p.m. Wednesday at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1985 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Oscar-winning character actor Edmond O'Brien, whose film roles ranged from introspective, beleaguered heroes to dynamic cops and private eyes, died after a years-long battle with Alzheimer's disease, a spokesman said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1985 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Oscar-winning character actor Edmond O'Brien, whose film roles ranged from introspective, beleaguered heroes to dynamic cops and private eyes, died after a years-long battle with Alzheimer's disease, a spokesman said Thursday.
NEWS
October 18, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
This 1946 release marked the 1946 screen debut of Burt Lancaster--in a full-fledged starring role. Directed by Robert Siodmak and based on an Ernest Hemingway short story, "The Killers," like its star, wears very well indeed. One of the earliest films noir, it opens with Lancaster, a one-time ring contender and now a service station attendant in a small New Jersey town, refusing to run away from the hit men who have been on his trail for years.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
This is the fast-moving gangster classic written by Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts from a Virginia Kellogg story. Director Raoul Walsh gets away with placing migraine-prone mobster James Cagney (pictured) on his mother's lap without a trace of self-consciousness; never was an Oedipus complex presented with so little fuss. This 1949 production, which co-stars Virginia Mayo and Edmond O'Brien, is even more famous for Cagney's tag line, "Top of the world, Ma!" (TMC Thursday at 5:05 a.m.
NEWS
May 9, 1985 | From Associated Press
Oscar-winning actor Edmond O'Brien, whose roles ranged from the original "1984" to "Julius Caesar," died at a sanitorium after a long bout with Alzheimer's disease, a spokesman announced today. He was 69. The New York-born O'Brien, who won the Academy Award in 1954 as best supporting actor for his portrayal of Hollywood press agent Oscar Muldoon in "The Barefoot Contessa," died at 9:30 p.m. Wednesday at St.
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