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Edmund C Szoka

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January 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka, who presided over the largest closing of Roman Catholic churches in U.S. history, will leave the archdiocese of Detroit to take a top financial post in Rome, the Vatican announced. Pope John Paul II named Szoka, 62, currently the head of the nation's fifth-largest archdiocese, as president of the Vatican's Prefecture for Economic Affairs. Last year, Szoka ordered 35 parishes in Detroit closed because of sharply declining membership.
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NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka, who presided over the largest closing of Roman Catholic churches in U.S. history, will leave the archdiocese of Detroit to take a top financial post in Rome, the Vatican announced. Pope John Paul II named Szoka, 62, currently the head of the nation's fifth-largest archdiocese, as president of the Vatican's Prefecture for Economic Affairs. Last year, Szoka ordered 35 parishes in Detroit closed because of sharply declining membership.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 1990
Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka, a fiscal hard-liner who presided over the largest closing of Roman Catholic churches in U.S. history, will leave the Archdiocese of Detroit to take a top financial post in Rome, the Vatican announced today.
NEWS
December 9, 1988 | Associated Press
opponents of proposals to close or merge more than 40 of the city's Roman Catholic parishes have delivered protest petitions with an estimated 20,000 signatures to Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka's residence. Before delivering the petitions Wednesday night, about 1,000 persons held a prayer vigil at the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament. Jay Berman, a spokesman for the archdiocese, said Szoka was not at home to receive the petitions because of a previously scheduled engagement.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Five of 25 Roman Catholic churches in a yearlong test failed to prove they were economically viable and will be ordered closed, the archdiocese of Detroit announced. The five city parishes will join 30 other churches that Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka, the archbishop of Detroit, ordered closed in 1989 because of dwindling attendance and financial difficulties. The 20 other churches in the test proved their viability and will survive.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | From Associated Press
Following are excerpts from Pope John Paul II's homily at Laguna Seca Raceway in Monterey . . . . The land is God's gift. From the beginning, God has entrusted it to the whole human race as a means of sustaining the life of all those whom he creates in his own image and likeness. We must use the land to sustain every human being in life and dignity.
NEWS
May 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Pope John Paul II on Sunday named 25 new cardinals from 18 countries, including prelates from Lithuania and Hong Kong in a move to bolster the Roman Catholic Church in the Soviet Union and in China, after it assumes control of Hong Kong in 1997. Two Americans, Archbishops James A. Hickey of Washington, D.C., and Edmund C. Szoka of Detroit, were on the list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Saving historic church buildings is less important than keeping the parish life within them strong, Cardinal Edmund C. Szoka said in defense of a bold plan to close 43 Roman Catholic churches in the city. Despite protests in the two weeks since the recommendations were made to shut down more than one-third of the city's church buildings, the archbishop of Detroit predicted this week that parishioners' unhappiness with the planned closings would decrease.
NEWS
March 22, 1987 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
A group of senior American Roman Catholic bishops Saturday ended three days of closed-door talks with top Vatican officials concerning Pope John Paul II's forthcoming visit to the United States by joining the pontiff for a long Vatican lunch and a cheerful songfest.
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