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OPINION
June 2, 2003
Thank you for the May 29 editorial on Edmund Hillary ("Pinnacle of Achievement"). It provided a moment to ponder humility, kindness and the knowing that we achieve only on the shoulders of many others. Heide Franke Santa Monica
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SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | Chris Erskine
What do I know of life? For years, I thought Taco Bell was a Mexican phone company. I thought Hash Tag was a mouthy wide receiver for the Atlanta Falcons. So when I got wind of the Swiss Forrest Gump, an adventurer who ran 25,422 miles over five years till he'd circled the world, his beautiful green-eyed wife riding along on a motorcycle the whole time with their supplies, I wasn't sure if I had a column or a Nobel Prize candidate. A marathon a day, five days a week, for five years.
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NEWS
May 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The son of the man who first climbed Mt. Everest reached the peak of the world's highest mountain Thursday, following an American team and members of a three-nation climb to the crowded summit. Peter Hillary, 36, son of mountaineer Edmund Hillary, reached the top of the 29,028-foot-high peak 37 years after his father and Sherpa guide Tenzing Norgay pioneered the way. It was his fourth attempt. Hillary followed the traditional southeastern route first used by his father.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
After Sir Edmund Hillary's historic ascent of Mt. Everest, everyone knew Hillary's name. Far fewer knew about his indispensable partner, George Lowe. Hillary and his friend Lowe were the only two New Zealanders on the 1953 expedition to the top of the world's highest peak. If they could have had their way, they would have trekked to the summit together, but a number of circumstances, including the politics of giving two non-Brits on a British-led team the prime roles, conspired to leave Lowe among the unsung.
OPINION
May 29, 2003
"To my right, a slender snow ridge climbed up to a snowy dome about 40 feet above our heads," wrote Edmund Hillary. Then, "I waved Tenzing [Norgay] up to me. A few more whacks of the ice ax, a few very weary steps and we were on the summit of Everest." That is how Hillary described their last steps to the top of the world 50 years ago today in his book "High Adventure." This was the era of grand national expeditions to the world's highest peaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA
Sir Edmund Hillary is appropriately impressive, a mountain of a man with a shock of white hair, a somewhat craggy brow and a wizened demeanor. At 73, he still looks the part of a bigger than life, death-defying, conquering hero. Perhaps that is why dozens of people at a reception in his honor queued up to shake hands and have their picture taken with the man who in 1953, with his Sherpa guide Tenzing Norgay, was the first to scale Mt. Everest.
NEWS
May 10, 1986 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Tenzing Norgay, the slight Sherpa guide who helped vanquish the menacing peak of mankind's greatest mountain, died Friday in the Himalayan mountain resort of Darjeeling in India's West Bengal state. He was believed to be 72 and died about 100 miles from the site of the triumph that propelled him from an illiterate tribesman into the palaces and state houses of the world. Edmund Hillary, the beekeeper who stood atop Mt.
SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | Chris Erskine
What do I know of life? For years, I thought Taco Bell was a Mexican phone company. I thought Hash Tag was a mouthy wide receiver for the Atlanta Falcons. So when I got wind of the Swiss Forrest Gump, an adventurer who ran 25,422 miles over five years till he'd circled the world, his beautiful green-eyed wife riding along on a motorcycle the whole time with their supplies, I wasn't sure if I had a column or a Nobel Prize candidate. A marathon a day, five days a week, for five years.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | ARTHUR MAX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Edmund Hillary awakened in his tent at 4 a.m. and thawed his frozen boots over a stove. At 6:30, he began his climb up the last 1,100 feet to the top of the world. It was 17 degrees below zero. Wind whipped slivers of ice into his bearded cheeks on that brilliant morning May 29, 1953, as he and Tenzing Norgay, a guide from the Sherpa mountain tribe, chipped and picked their way up the steep white slope of Mt. Everest.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | EILEEN ALT POWELL, Associated Press
What Sir Edmund Hillary recalls most vividly about standing at the top of Mt. Everest 35 years ago is the ice--prickly, biting slivers of ice billowing around like a white halo. "They bore into your face, cutting and tingling," he said. "And exhilarating." On May 29, 1953, Hillary and his Sherpa guide, Tenzing Norgay, became the first men to conquer the world's tallest mountain. Neither Hillary nor Norgay, who died in 1986, ever said who got there first.
OPINION
June 2, 2003
Thank you for the May 29 editorial on Edmund Hillary ("Pinnacle of Achievement"). It provided a moment to ponder humility, kindness and the knowing that we achieve only on the shoulders of many others. Heide Franke Santa Monica
NEWS
June 1, 2003 | Laurinda Keys, Associated Press Writer
The hundreds of people who attempt to climb Mt. Everest every year know one important thing that Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay didn't before 11:30 a.m. on May 29, 1953. It's possible to climb the world's tallest peak and survive. Fifty years after Hillary and Norgay became the first humans to stand on the world's highest peak, at a height of 29,035 feet, some 1,200 people have equaled their feat. "People ask, 'What was all the fuss about?'
OPINION
May 29, 2003
"To my right, a slender snow ridge climbed up to a snowy dome about 40 feet above our heads," wrote Edmund Hillary. Then, "I waved Tenzing [Norgay] up to me. A few more whacks of the ice ax, a few very weary steps and we were on the summit of Everest." That is how Hillary described their last steps to the top of the world 50 years ago today in his book "High Adventure." This was the era of grand national expeditions to the world's highest peaks.
SPORTS
April 26, 2003 | PETE THOMAS
Nearly 50 years ago, on May 29, 1953, Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, weary of body and mind but driven by a desire that burned deeper by the day, left their exhausted climbing party behind and marched to the top of the world. As they stood where no man had ever stood, in the thinnest of air on the 29,035-foot summit of Mt. Everest, they knew that what they had just accomplished was incredible. But they had no way of knowing what it really meant.
TRAVEL
November 24, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Here come the holidays, and with them the season's usual bounty from the publishing industry: coffee-table books. Here are four new travel-related volumes that might make worthy gifts. "Planet Earth" is a book that strikes you between the eyes. Its lures are many, from the richness of the colors in these pictures taken from space to the thrill of spotting a familiar continental profile.
NEWS
May 26, 2002 | RAY LILLEY, Associated Press
When climbers scramble to the summit of the world's highest peak, their last obstacle is a 40-foot rock face covered in ice--the Hillary Step. Before May 29, 1953, it had no name. Nobody had ever seen it up close, let alone scaled it. But on that day, a 33-year-old New Zealand beekeeper and his Nepalese Sherpa guide cut a line of footholds into the icy wall and dragged their exhausted, oxygen-starved bodies the final feet to glory. Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay had become the first climbers to reach the 29,035-foot summit of Mt. Everest.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At dinner with Sir Edmund Hillary, an admirer once likened him to the greatest of sports heroes, in the class of, say, Mickey Mantle. A hush fell over the table. Hillary narrowed his eyes. "More like Neil Armstrong," the old man corrected. But what if . . . What if Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay were not the first to step onto the top of Mt. Everest back on that amazing day of May 29, 1953? More to the point, what if you could prove they were second by 29 years?
SPORTS
April 26, 2003 | PETE THOMAS
Nearly 50 years ago, on May 29, 1953, Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, weary of body and mind but driven by a desire that burned deeper by the day, left their exhausted climbing party behind and marched to the top of the world. As they stood where no man had ever stood, in the thinnest of air on the 29,035-foot summit of Mt. Everest, they knew that what they had just accomplished was incredible. But they had no way of knowing what it really meant.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At dinner with Sir Edmund Hillary, an admirer once likened him to the greatest of sports heroes, in the class of, say, Mickey Mantle. A hush fell over the table. Hillary narrowed his eyes. "More like Neil Armstrong," the old man corrected. But what if . . . What if Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay were not the first to step onto the top of Mt. Everest back on that amazing day of May 29, 1953? More to the point, what if you could prove they were second by 29 years?
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | ARTHUR MAX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Edmund Hillary awakened in his tent at 4 a.m. and thawed his frozen boots over a stove. At 6:30, he began his climb up the last 1,100 feet to the top of the world. It was 17 degrees below zero. Wind whipped slivers of ice into his bearded cheeks on that brilliant morning May 29, 1953, as he and Tenzing Norgay, a guide from the Sherpa mountain tribe, chipped and picked their way up the steep white slope of Mt. Everest.
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