Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEdolphus Ed Towns
IN THE NEWS

Edolphus Ed Towns

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | Associated Press
Rep. Edolphus (Ed) Towns, a liberal Democrat from Brooklyn, N. Y., on Wednesday was elected chairman of the Black Caucus for the 102nd Congress. "It's official. You can give me your condolences," Towns joked after the vote. He will succeed Rep. Ronald V. Dellums (D-Berkeley). Towns, 56, elected to a fifth term in the House last month, said the caucus will meet early in the new session and discuss its goals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | Associated Press
Rep. Edolphus (Ed) Towns, a liberal Democrat from Brooklyn, N. Y., on Wednesday was elected chairman of the Black Caucus for the 102nd Congress. "It's official. You can give me your condolences," Towns joked after the vote. He will succeed Rep. Ronald V. Dellums (D-Berkeley). Towns, 56, elected to a fifth term in the House last month, said the caucus will meet early in the new session and discuss its goals.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 17, 1992
Here is a list of the 22 worst offenders in the House bank case as identified by the committee April 1. It includes present and former members. Those who made this list had negative balances that exceeded their next paychecks for at least eight of the 39 months reviewed. This, according to the ethics panel, made them worse offenders even though other members wrote more bad checks. * Bill Alexander (D-Ark.): 487 * Tommy Robinson (D-Ark.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The identities of 16 congressional Democrats and five former lawmakers found to be among the worst offenders in the House hot-check scandal were revealed Saturday night in a deliberate news leak that omitted the names of three Republicans also on the list. The Associated Press, which disclosed the names, said the list was provided by unidentified congressional sources.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected move, the Congressional Black Caucus declared Thursday it will attempt to mobilize the black community nationwide to fight the confirmation of conservative black jurist Clarence Thomas to a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. The caucus is the first black organization to actively oppose Thomas, and its planned campaign could deal a significant blow to the Bush Administration's hopes for a fast and trouble-free Senate confirmation.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
Rep. Gus Savage (D-Ill.), who has been accused of sexually assaulting a woman Peace Corps volunteer on a trip to Zaire, also disrupted a congressional trip to China in 1986 by declaring that he was being held "a political prisoner" in Beijing, sources said Tuesday. Savage, 64, a five-term congressman from Chicago, caused such a ruckus during the trip to China that officials at the U.S.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women and minorities made historic gains in Senate and House races Tuesday in an election that greatly changed the face of Congress and yet returned a vast majority of incumbents to office. More than 100 new members will be sworn in when Congress convenes in January. But most of the newcomers were elected to fill seats in which incumbents did not seek reelection. Spurred by the House banking and post office scandals and other factors, incumbents retired from Congress in record numbers this year.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writers
Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.) took more than 40 all-expenses-paid trips and collected more than $114,000 in appearance fees in 1988, making her the leader in honorariums among the more than 400 House members whose personal financial disclosure reports were made public Monday. Just as Schroeder's honorariums more than doubled from $50,630 in 1987, the total flow of special-interest money to members of the House also increased substantially last year, despite growing criticism of members who pocket these fees in addition to the $89,500 annual government salary.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The same political winds that swept the nation's first baby-boomer into the White House also lofted a new class of black lawmakers onto Capitol Hill. Unlike the wave of black preachers and social activists who arrived in Washington more than 20 years ago, this new group of African-American lawmakers are long on prior legislative experience and more closely attuned to the needs of their districts. As a result, they are expected to generate less rhetoric but produce more results.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aware that political careers may be doomed by their action, the House Ethics Committee on Wednesday night disclosed the names of 22 current and former members of Congress that it classified as the worst abusers in the House bank scandal. Even before the much-dreaded list was revealed, several of those identified as flagrant writers of overdrafts took to the House floor with emotional denials of wrongdoing, and a few condemned the ethics panel for its decision.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Bush bolsters his efforts to lift U.S. sanctions against South Africa by meeting with Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi today, anti-apartheid leaders in the United States who believe sanctions are still essential find themselves fighting an uphill battle and losing the public relations war.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|