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Eduard Shevardnadze

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September 22, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Scheer is a Times national correspondent.
In June of 1986 Mikhail Gorbachev, secretary general of the Soviet Communist Party, placed a call to his old Communist apparatchik buddy down in Soviet Georgia to come to Moscow and help end the cold war. The buzz in Moscow foreign-policy circles was shock at the elevation of this bumpkin.
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NEWS
February 11, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fragile calm of recent years is shattered: Russia's volatile southern neighbors, which have been recovering from wars that devastated them after the Soviet collapse in 1991, are in uproar again over the latest failed assassination attempt against the region's grand old man, Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze. The reason for Tuesday's disquiet is the fear among political leaders across the former Soviet south that Russia, the region's one big power, may have been behind the attack.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1990
Eduard Shevardnadze has lived under a dictatorship all his life. Where was his support for democracy when Stalin was his leader? Methinks Mr. Shev is jealous of the success Gorbachev has had in bringing changes and getting credit. Shevardnadze is not doing his country any favor with his tantrum. WILHELM SCHWEDLER Newport Beach
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to a resignation threat by Georgian head of state Eduard A. Shevardnadze, Georgia's Parliament on Tuesday imposed a two-month state of emergency on the war-ravaged country to combat a wave of criminal and paramilitary violence. The vote came late in the evening, after Shevardnadze reacted to the Parliament's reluctance to impose the emergency by tendering his resignation during a televised legislative session and stalking out of the hall with the words, "I'm fed up with it all."
OPINION
December 30, 1990
Eduard Shevardnadze, come blow your whistle here. As President Bush takes more and more power unto himself preparing for war and ignoring Congress, you can help us stem the tide towards our own version of "the advance of dictatorship." SUZY and WALLY MARKS, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1990 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications. and
The undistinguished career of Eduard A. Shevardnadze as Soviet foreign minister glowed in the farewell tributes of his Western fans as if he had been Talleyrand. From Secretary of State James A. Baker III, from the German foreign minister, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, from the Western world, came testaments to the deep personal friendship borne for the white-haired Georgian, mingled with strophes about his vision and reforming zeal.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze arrived here Wednesday to set the stage for a planned Sino-Soviet summit meeting that would formally end three decades of hostility between China and the Soviet Union. "We are convinced that the summit will open a new chapter in the history of two neighboring countries," Shevardnadze said in a written statement given to reporters upon his arrival at Beijing airport. "We are starting our negotiations fully aware of . . .
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to a resignation threat by Georgian head of state Eduard A. Shevardnadze, Georgia's Parliament on Tuesday imposed a two-month state of emergency on the war-ravaged country to combat a wave of criminal and paramilitary violence. The vote came late in the evening, after Shevardnadze reacted to the Parliament's reluctance to impose the emergency by tendering his resignation during a televised legislative session and stalking out of the hall with the words, "I'm fed up with it all."
OPINION
March 31, 1991 | Michael Parks, Michael Parks is Moscow bureau chief for The Times
According to Soviet political tradition, retired politicians become nonpersons. Once they leave office, they disappear. If they leave with honor, their names go into history books. They do not, however, speak out on current affairs. But Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the former Soviet foreign minister, has no plans, at age 63, to drift quietly into such obscurity. The suave, silver-haired Georgian who, as much as President Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
The former Soviet foreign minister said world concern over the mounting civilian casualties in Iraq is justified but should not be allowed to eclipse the suffering of the Kuwaitis. "The subject of casualties of the tiny Kuwaiti people has been moved to the background," he said.
BOOKS
September 22, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Scheer is a Times national correspondent.
In June of 1986 Mikhail Gorbachev, secretary general of the Soviet Communist Party, placed a call to his old Communist apparatchik buddy down in Soviet Georgia to come to Moscow and help end the cold war. The buzz in Moscow foreign-policy circles was shock at the elevation of this bumpkin.
OPINION
March 31, 1991 | Michael Parks, Michael Parks is Moscow bureau chief for The Times
According to Soviet political tradition, retired politicians become nonpersons. Once they leave office, they disappear. If they leave with honor, their names go into history books. They do not, however, speak out on current affairs. But Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the former Soviet foreign minister, has no plans, at age 63, to drift quietly into such obscurity. The suave, silver-haired Georgian who, as much as President Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
The former Soviet foreign minister said world concern over the mounting civilian casualties in Iraq is justified but should not be allowed to eclipse the suffering of the Kuwaitis. "The subject of casualties of the tiny Kuwaiti people has been moved to the background," he said.
OPINION
December 30, 1990
Eduard Shevardnadze, come blow your whistle here. As President Bush takes more and more power unto himself preparing for war and ignoring Congress, you can help us stem the tide towards our own version of "the advance of dictatorship." SUZY and WALLY MARKS, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1990
Eduard Shevardnadze has lived under a dictatorship all his life. Where was his support for democracy when Stalin was his leader? Methinks Mr. Shev is jealous of the success Gorbachev has had in bringing changes and getting credit. Shevardnadze is not doing his country any favor with his tantrum. WILHELM SCHWEDLER Newport Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1990 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications. and
The undistinguished career of Eduard A. Shevardnadze as Soviet foreign minister glowed in the farewell tributes of his Western fans as if he had been Talleyrand. From Secretary of State James A. Baker III, from the German foreign minister, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, from the Western world, came testaments to the deep personal friendship borne for the white-haired Georgian, mingled with strophes about his vision and reforming zeal.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fragile calm of recent years is shattered: Russia's volatile southern neighbors, which have been recovering from wars that devastated them after the Soviet collapse in 1991, are in uproar again over the latest failed assassination attempt against the region's grand old man, Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze. The reason for Tuesday's disquiet is the fear among political leaders across the former Soviet south that Russia, the region's one big power, may have been behind the attack.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative die-hards and reformers went to war Tuesday for the hearts and minds of the Soviet Communist Party, with Yegor K. Ligachev denouncing the Gorbachev era's "reckless radicalism" and other leaders defending policies that stripped the "evil empire" label from their nation. One day after President Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze arrived here Wednesday to set the stage for a planned Sino-Soviet summit meeting that would formally end three decades of hostility between China and the Soviet Union. "We are convinced that the summit will open a new chapter in the history of two neighboring countries," Shevardnadze said in a written statement given to reporters upon his arrival at Beijing airport. "We are starting our negotiations fully aware of . . .
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