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Eduardo Cesar Angeloz

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NEWS
April 30, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Peronist presidential candidate Carlos Saul Menem's campaign offered a free lunch Saturday and about 8,000 Argentine retirees came, forming a vast street party that had the air of a victory celebration. Menem, the flamboyant populist governor of rural La Rioja province, demonstrated his campaign magic in the working-class Buenos Aires district of La Boca, the riverside entry point for millions of immigrants to Argentina over the years. The sit-down lunch stretched for five city blocks along a closed-off avenue.
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NEWS
May 14, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Juan Facundo Quiroga, a brutal 19th-Century provincial warlord from La Rioja, reigned for decades over northwest Argentina with his gaucho army until he was waylaid and murdered by rivals from powerful Cordoba province. Carlos Saul Menem, the Peronist party's presidential candidate who styles himself after Quiroga, complete with long-flowing hair and extravagant sideburns, appears likely to avenge that insult by defeating Cordoba province Gov. Eduardo Cesar Angeloz in today's election.
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NEWS
May 14, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Juan Facundo Quiroga, a brutal 19th-Century provincial warlord from La Rioja, reigned for decades over northwest Argentina with his gaucho army until he was waylaid and murdered by rivals from powerful Cordoba province. Carlos Saul Menem, the Peronist party's presidential candidate who styles himself after Quiroga, complete with long-flowing hair and extravagant sideburns, appears likely to avenge that insult by defeating Cordoba province Gov. Eduardo Cesar Angeloz in today's election.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Peronist presidential candidate Carlos Saul Menem's campaign offered a free lunch Saturday and about 8,000 Argentine retirees came, forming a vast street party that had the air of a victory celebration. Menem, the flamboyant populist governor of rural La Rioja province, demonstrated his campaign magic in the working-class Buenos Aires district of La Boca, the riverside entry point for millions of immigrants to Argentina over the years. The sit-down lunch stretched for five city blocks along a closed-off avenue.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
In the face of a devastating economic crisis, President Raul Alfonsin agreed Sunday to move up the inauguration of his Peronist successor rather than stagger through a seven-month transition. Leaders of Alfonsin's incumbent Radical Civic Union and advisers to President-elect Carlos Saul Menem are negotiating legal changes so that Alfonsin's term would conclude early, probably July 9--Argentina's independence day--instead of Dec. 10 as scheduled, officials from the two parties said.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The party created by Juan D. Peron in the mid-1940s, which won every Argentine election it was allowed to contest until its drubbing in 1983, has put to rest doubts that Peronism would be able to outlive its charismatic founder. Invoking the memory of Peron and his famous wife Evita, populist Carlos Saul Menem stormed to a stunning victory in the presidential election Sunday. He thus capitalized on disgust with the failure of the ruling Radical Civil Union to arrest Argentina's economic decline.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Argentina's two main political parties stumbled toward deadlock Monday on efforts to shorten the presidential transition and to forge an emergency economic program to rein in inflation of more than 8,000%. Leaders of the ruling Radical Civic Union threatened to refuse to move up the inauguration of Peronist party President-elect Carlos Saul Menem unless he agreed to support the emergency economic measures. Without such an accord, they said, President Raul Alfonsin will serve out his term until its scheduled conclusion Dec. 10, reversing his agreement Sunday night to a speedy transition to help restore economic order.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin announced Monday night that he will resign June 30, five months before his term expires, to allow his Peronist successor to begin confronting an unprecedented economic crisis. However, President-elect Carlos Saul Menem indicated early today that he might not accept the quick handover, calling Alfonsin's announcement "surprising." Menem huddled with his Cabinet appointees to discuss Alfonsin's unilateral declaration. In resolving to step down and hand over power to Menem, Alfonsin said that in light of the severe economic problems facing the country, "any delay will bring greater suffering."
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The Argentine government's economic team resigned Friday in the face of a deepening economic crisis just six weeks before the presidential election, in an attempt to rescue the campaign of the ruling party's candidate. Economy Minister Juan Sourrouille, Treasury Secretary Mario Brodersohn, Central Bank Governor Jose Machinea and other senior economy officials stepped down one day after the governing party's candidate, Eduardo Cesar Angeloz, publicly criticized their policies.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Groping to halt a devastating surge in inflation just ahead of the presidential election, Argentina's government Tuesday tightened price controls and tried to fend off demands for huge pay raises. The Argentine currency, the austral, plunged 17% against the dollar during the day, closing at 64.5 australs to the dollar, compared to 17 australs in early February. Interest rates rose to 40% per month. The plunge of the austral was a serious blow to President Raul Alfonsin's attempt this month to restore confidence by appointing a new economic team and ordering policy changes.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin, his own nation drowning in inflation as elections draw near, warned Friday that Latin America's worsening economic crisis poses grave dangers to the future of democracy in the region. In a speech to business executives, Alfonsin likened the developed world's treatment of Latin America to the Allies' harsh policies toward Germany after World War I. The punitive Versailles Treaty after the war, Alfonsin said, paved the way for the rise of dictator Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A newly forceful President Raul Alfonsin declared Tuesday that he will serve out his term rather than hand over power early to his Peronist successor, and he pledged "a war economy" to fight raging inflation. "What is certain is that we are resolved to govern without dismay until Dec. 10, so no one should come and say that what might happen is reason for an earlier hand-over," the president said in a nationally broadcast address. Alfonsin said President-elect Carlos Saul Menem's negotiators backed down from an apparently firm agreement on an emergency economic package to reduce runaway inflation, which was to accompany the transition.
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