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Eduardo Galeano

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December 29, 1985 | Allen Boyer, Boyer, a former student of Latin-American history, teaches law at the University of Oklahoma. and
In the South-American jungle, as history opens, jaguars teach men to build fires and hunt with bows. Columbus wades ashore in the Bahamas, asking the natives (in Hebrew, Chaldean and Arabic) if they can lead him to the Great Khan. The Virgin Mary appears at Guadelupe, Mex., olive-skinned and speaking in Nahuatl. "I am not a historian," Eduardo Galeano explains of the scenes he sketches.
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WORLD
April 21, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
The book that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez gave his U.S. counterpart, Barack Obama, has long been regarded as a bible for the Latin American left, found on the bookshelves and university reading lists of a generation of students in the region. "Open Veins of Latin America" recounts, as its subtitle says, "Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent" -- the harvesting of the region's cotton, rubber, coffee, fruit and other resources by U.S. and European powers.
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BOOKS
July 17, 1988 | Raymund A. Paredes, Paredes teaches English and Spanish literature at UCLA
"Century of the Wind" follows "Genesis" and "Faces and Masks" as the final volume in Eduardo Galeano's chronicle of the Americas, "Memory of Fire." In his trilogy, Galeano ranges geographically from Canada to Argentina and Chile and chronologically from the pre-Columbian period to the present. To be sure, Galeano focuses on Latin America, shifting his attention above the Rio Grande primarily to treat events that have had large consequences in Mexico and lands farther south.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2006 | Tom Miller, Special to The Times
IF you are familiar with recent literature from Latin America, surely you have come across Eduardo Galeano's work. Now in his mid-60s, the Uruguayan writer has had the good fortune over the years to be widely translated for audiences in North America and Europe, rewarding his readers with poetic militancy, a dark and righteous vision, and an impish morality.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
In "Memory of Fire," the Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano wrote an epic in the form of a poetic scrapbook. It was a history of the Americas that up-ended the map, so that South and Central America were here and present at the top, and down under was the United States: a Patagonia of the imagination, the nightmare and the dream. It was told in a tumult of clippings, anecdotes and epigrams--not governed, really, but herded by the author's gifts of irony, paradox, sentiment and surreal association.
BOOKS
May 12, 1991 | Michael Harris
THE BOOK OF EMBRACES by Eduardo Galeano , translated from the Spanish by Cedric Belfrage (W. W. Norton: $19.95; 281 pp.) . Uruguayan journalist Eduardo Galeano is best known for "Memory of Fire," his idiosyncratic three-volume history of the Americas. This book is an introduction to the man, his work, his friends, his heroes and his abiding passions.
SPORTS
May 28, 1998 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD
What: "Soccer in Sun and Shadow," by Eduardo Galeano (translated by Mark Fried), published by Verso, 228 pages, $22. It's all here. Everything you should know about soccer, the world's game. And just in time for the World Cup. Galeano puts a South American spin on his book, but that's to be expected since he lives, writes and watches soccer in his hometown of Montevideo, Uruguay. That's a refreshing change from the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2006 | Tom Miller, Special to The Times
IF you are familiar with recent literature from Latin America, surely you have come across Eduardo Galeano's work. Now in his mid-60s, the Uruguayan writer has had the good fortune over the years to be widely translated for audiences in North America and Europe, rewarding his readers with poetic militancy, a dark and righteous vision, and an impish morality.
WORLD
April 21, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
The book that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez gave his U.S. counterpart, Barack Obama, has long been regarded as a bible for the Latin American left, found on the bookshelves and university reading lists of a generation of students in the region. "Open Veins of Latin America" recounts, as its subtitle says, "Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent" -- the harvesting of the region's cotton, rubber, coffee, fruit and other resources by U.S. and European powers.
SPORTS
May 28, 1998 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD
What: "Soccer in Sun and Shadow," by Eduardo Galeano (translated by Mark Fried), published by Verso, 228 pages, $22. It's all here. Everything you should know about soccer, the world's game. And just in time for the World Cup. Galeano puts a South American spin on his book, but that's to be expected since he lives, writes and watches soccer in his hometown of Montevideo, Uruguay. That's a refreshing change from the U.S.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
In "Memory of Fire," the Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano wrote an epic in the form of a poetic scrapbook. It was a history of the Americas that up-ended the map, so that South and Central America were here and present at the top, and down under was the United States: a Patagonia of the imagination, the nightmare and the dream. It was told in a tumult of clippings, anecdotes and epigrams--not governed, really, but herded by the author's gifts of irony, paradox, sentiment and surreal association.
BOOKS
May 12, 1991 | Michael Harris
THE BOOK OF EMBRACES by Eduardo Galeano , translated from the Spanish by Cedric Belfrage (W. W. Norton: $19.95; 281 pp.) . Uruguayan journalist Eduardo Galeano is best known for "Memory of Fire," his idiosyncratic three-volume history of the Americas. This book is an introduction to the man, his work, his friends, his heroes and his abiding passions.
BOOKS
July 17, 1988 | Raymund A. Paredes, Paredes teaches English and Spanish literature at UCLA
"Century of the Wind" follows "Genesis" and "Faces and Masks" as the final volume in Eduardo Galeano's chronicle of the Americas, "Memory of Fire." In his trilogy, Galeano ranges geographically from Canada to Argentina and Chile and chronologically from the pre-Columbian period to the present. To be sure, Galeano focuses on Latin America, shifting his attention above the Rio Grande primarily to treat events that have had large consequences in Mexico and lands farther south.
BOOKS
March 15, 1987 | Allen Boyer, Boyer, a student of Latin-American history, teaches law at the University of Tennessee.
In one scene from "Faces and Masks," the second volume in his "Memory of Fire" trilogy, Eduardo Galeano describes the collapse of the Spanish empire: "The messenger passes an order at the cockfights in Santiago, and another at a smart soiree, and at the same time picks up a report between two horse races in the suburbs.
OPINION
February 21, 1988
I read Eduardo Galeano's ("A Ballad for Nicaragua--a Pitiful Place, Yet So Desired by the Powerful," Op-Ed Page, Feb. 16) words with astonishment--not at their beauty but at their very existence. His succinct version of the truth is a welcome addition to the debate over Nicaragua, which for so long in the Congress and mainstream media has been a weary cycle of Contra-funding arguments. The central postulates--that Nicaragua must somehow be "contained" and that the Sandinistas betrayed their revolution--are never challenged, even by the most avid anti-Contra partisans.
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