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Eduardo Robledo Rincon

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NEWS
December 6, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo is headed for the first showdown of his new government this week, with eleventh-hour negotiations over Chiapas ending in a tentative agreement likely to leave Mexico's embattled southernmost state with two governors and parallel governments. Armed rebels warned that the scheduled ruling-party gubernatorial inauguration in Chiapas on Thursday could trigger a blood bath. In a move to ease tensions, Gov.
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NEWS
February 15, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring "I surrender my votes for peace," the controversial ruling party governor of Chiapas resigned Tuesday in the first of a series of dramatic moves to defuse the conflict in Mexico's southernmost state. Eduardo Robledo Rincon's sudden, eloquent resignation met a key demand of the Zapatista National Liberation Army and handed President Ernesto Zedillo a velvet glove in his military crackdown on the rebel leadership.
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NEWS
December 9, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two men took the oath of office Thursday to be governor of the deeply divided southern state of Chiapas, both promising a new constitution and electoral reform. Eduardo Robledo Rincon, the ruling party candidate and official winner of the Aug. 21 election, was inaugurated during a special legislative session at the modernistic City Theater with Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo in attendance.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two men took the oath of office Thursday to be governor of the deeply divided southern state of Chiapas, both promising a new constitution and electoral reform. Eduardo Robledo Rincon, the ruling party candidate and official winner of the Aug. 21 election, was inaugurated during a special legislative session at the modernistic City Theater with Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo in attendance.
NEWS
February 15, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring "I surrender my votes for peace," the controversial ruling party governor of Chiapas resigned Tuesday in the first of a series of dramatic moves to defuse the conflict in Mexico's southernmost state. Eduardo Robledo Rincon's sudden, eloquent resignation met a key demand of the Zapatista National Liberation Army and handed President Ernesto Zedillo a velvet glove in his military crackdown on the rebel leadership.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | Times Wire Services
The top opposition candidate for Chiapas governor was critically injured in a mysterious highway collision Monday, stoking political tensions. Amado Avendano Figueroa, a 60-year-old lawyer who has represented Indian peasants in land disputes, was injured and three others were killed when a truck struck their campaign car in a remote area of the state, police said. Avendano was reported in critical but stable condition. The candidate's son was also injured.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1994
* The market fell Wednesday for the fifth straight session, as profit takers were encouraged by higher interest rates and by new concerns about violence in the southern state of Chiapas. The Bolsa index lost 30.11 points to 2,702.73. * Traders said the selloff started after the Bank of Mexico reported a half-point rise in 28-day treasury bill yields, to 14%. Sellers were further encouraged after Zapatista rebel leader Subcomandante Marcos in Chiapas called for the resignation of Gov.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
The newly elected governor of Tabasco state was sworn in Saturday while 3,000 protesters in the capital's central square demanded new elections. Hundreds of riot police guarded government buildings, but no clashes were reported. The demonstrators, mainly peasants, claim Roberto Madrazo Pintado of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) won the Nov. 20 election through fraud and voter intimidation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1995
Mexicans have this political gag: The only way the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) can win these days is by losing. That line always gets cynical laughs because Mexicans have grown so accustomed to PRI candidates "winning" elections by vote fraud and other dubious means that even when a PRI candidate wins legitimately, voters cynically assume there have been political shenanigans.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two days into his presidency, Ernesto Zedillo sought to fulfill his promise to govern through dialogue Saturday, sending his new interior secretary to meet for the first time with a key Chiapas opposition leader in an effort to avert an insurrection in Mexico's impoverished southernmost state.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo is headed for the first showdown of his new government this week, with eleventh-hour negotiations over Chiapas ending in a tentative agreement likely to leave Mexico's embattled southernmost state with two governors and parallel governments. Armed rebels warned that the scheduled ruling-party gubernatorial inauguration in Chiapas on Thursday could trigger a blood bath. In a move to ease tensions, Gov.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governor of the southeastern state of Chiapas resigned Wednesday in the face of accusations that he ignored warnings of the Christmas-week massacre of 45 unarmed villagers, allegedly carried out by a gang of attackers linked to Mexico's ruling political party. Analysts interpreted the departure of Gov. Julio Cesar Ruiz Ferro as another direct intervention by President Ernesto Zedillo in the troubled state to try to break the stalemate in the 4-year-old conflict with Zapatista rebels.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Christmas Eve announcement that analysts called a potential breakthrough toward a peaceful settlement to the conflict in Chiapas, President Ernesto Zedillo's government made a major concession Saturday to the rebels in Mexico's southernmost state, the Zapatista National Liberation Army.
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