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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2003 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles school officials on Monday urged parents whose children attend chronically underperforming schools to apply for free tutoring in math and English, which begins in November. The Los Angeles Unified School District mailed applications earlier this month to 186,000 students, from 104 schools, who are eligible for the extra assistance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Bryan Mejia has some advice for the Los Angeles Board of Education. He isn't a gadfly or political consultant. He isn't running for office - he can't even vote. Mejia is a high school student. And he wants to help fix what he and other students see as the board's fundamental flaw: It is missing a voice it purports to represent. "We should have representation where the decisions affecting our education are made," the 17-year-old said. "The school board. " The board is expected to vote Tuesday on a proposal to allow a student advisory member on the board.
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OPINION
June 11, 2013 | By Thomas A. DiPrete and Claudia Buchmann
In the ongoing discussion of how to boost the education and skill levels of the American workforce, one central issue is rarely addressed: the gap between male and female achievement. The reality is that the slowdown in U.S. educational gains is predominantly a male affair, and one that drags down the overall competitiveness of our workforce and workers' ability to land (or create) good jobs. To get more Americans working and set economic growth back on track, we need to understand what's going on with men in education.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "France is having a midweek crisis," Column One, Nov. 6 The controversy over French children having to attend class on Wednesdays brought to mind a quote by a friend - a teacher - who once said, "The mind can only absorb what punishment that the fanny can take. " Too many hours during a single sitting do not necessarily translate to productivity. Rich Flynn Huntington Beach ALSO: Letters: Justice poorly served Letters: Legalizing street vendors Letters: Prayer and the Supreme Court
OPINION
May 29, 2012
Re "Romney spars with teachers over class size," May 25 Here's one for Mitt Romney. You want to fix U.S. education, civil rights issues, poverty spirals and low unemployment rates? Try this: Pass a law that mandates compulsory and free medical services to all children of citizens from birth to age 18. This revolution would make quantum leaps in eliminating the poverty barrier and the achievement gap, and maybe then class size wouldn't matter. President Obama has been our only president to connect achievement to proper medical care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996
With regard to education in general: The failure of our society in almost every respect proves that stupidity is something that has to be learned. JOSEPH MANDELBERG Granada Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
Danish director Lone Scherfig always has an easy touch with relationships, never overplaying the hand she's been dealt. That grace suffuses her enchanting new film, "An Education," a coming-of-age story set in 1960s London with Carey Mulligan as its star and perhaps the year's most refreshing new face. Though Mulligan is, in the technical sense, not a discovery, having waltzed nicely through a number of smaller roles (including playing a Bennet sister in 2005's "Pride & Prejudice"), this is the one that should cede a rapid rise.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
It's hard not to think that Carey Mulligan is having a "Queen for a Day" moment. Done up in purple satin, with gold kick-me stilettos, the fresh-faced 24-year-old is dolled up for pictures and perched on an antique table in the presidential suite of the Beverly Wilshire Hotel, a $4,200-a-night, multi-room perch atop the storied hotel. The room isn't hers, even for the night, and neither are the clothes. Practically everything touching her skin is borrowed -- except for the air of giddy excitement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014
A sample of what L.A. County superintendents were paid in 2013 and the district enrollment: Jose Fernandez Centinela Valley $674,559; 6,637 John Deasy Los Angeles $393,106; 655,494 Gary W. Woods Beverly Hills $255,000; 4,515 Christopher Steinhauser Long Beach $251,155; 82,256 Cynthia Parulan-Colfer Hacienda La Puente $189,423; 20,358 Sources: state, county and district...
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By Emily Koss
"Emily, would you please put a bowl of water on the floor so I can drink like a dog?" It was a sweet and funny request, and I was happy to do it. But it was also a reminder, once again, that I work for a 4-year-old. You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market. As a 24-year-old recent college grad, I can tell you that what you've been hearing is true. I graduated last May with unpaid internships waiting for me in Mexico, Spain and Nicaragua.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As Los Angeles County sheriff, Lee Baca was roundly and rightly criticized for his failure to prevent or correct the abuse of jail inmates over the course of his 15 years in office, most notably during the final few years of turmoil that culminated in the indictment of 20 deputies and Baca's resignation. It is not uncommon, when a controversial figure leaves power, for critics to denigrate every aspect of his tenure and leadership philosophy, and it would be easy to write off anything that happened at the jails on Baca's watch as being a disaster that must be reversed at the earliest possible moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A groundbreaking, two-month trial challenging teacher job protections in California concluded Thursday with both sides asserting that the interests of students are at stake. The case, Vergara vs. California, seeks to overturn a set of laws that affect how teachers are fired, laid off and granted tenure. The Silicon Valley-based group Students Matter brought the lawsuit on behalf of nine plaintiffs, contending that the regulations hinder the removal of ineffective teachers. The result is a workforce with thousands of "grossly ineffective" teachers, which disproportionately hurts low-income and minority students, attorneys said.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Working as a Jack in the Box cashier, Marissa Cruz Santos breathed a sigh of relief last year when she qualified for an Obama administration program that defers deportation of young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children. With high expectations and a freshly minted work permit, Santos, 27, hit the job market, hoping to leverage her new status and a Cal State Fullerton degree into an entry-level office position. But after applying for several jobs near her Riverside home, Santos got only two interviews and no offers.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Two-fifths of the nation's public school districts offer no preschool programs, and most of those that do offer only part-day programs. Black students account for less than a fifth of those in preschool across the nation but make up almost half of the students who are suspended from preschool multiple times. Those results from the first comprehensive survey in nearly 15 years of civil rights data from the 97,000 U.S. public schools show they remain marked by inequities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
SAN FRANCISCO - The University of California took a big step Thursday toward what astronomers predict will be vastly improved exploration of the solar system and universe. The UC regents approved the university's participation in the construction and operation of the Thirty Meter Telescope in Hawaii, a scientifically ambitious project shared by Caltech and astronomy groups from Canada, Japan, India and China. The $1.4-billion telescope was described as the most advanced optical telescope in the world, with extra power and improved clarity to see distant planets and older stars than is possible now. Construction is scheduled to start this year and the telescope would be in operation in 2022, officials said.
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