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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1998
Your article ("Despite Hot Issues, School Races Stay Cool," Oct. 26) suggests the Education Alliance is on the decline because we are supporting "only" 24 school board candidates and have raised "only" $50,000. On the contrary. Most observers would consider those marks of vigorous activism. The Education Alliance is gradually breaking the teachers unions' stranglehold on our school boards. Every election, the unions lose a few more school board races. When we founded the alliance five years ago, only a handful of board members in this county were elected without union support.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2000
Your article about our recall campaign ("Rally Aims to Enlist Foes of Orange Board," Nov. 19) didn't tell the whole story. As a concerned Orange Unified parent and chairperson of the recall campaign, I'd like to offer your readers some key points that the community should know about us. We are working to recall three school board members--Linda Davis, Marty Jacobson and Maureen Aschoff--who have isolated themselves from the community they were elected...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new political group that grew out of last year's bid to pass a school voucher initiative is helping to finance 30 candidates in 15 Orange County school board races this fall and creating the first-ever countywide network of conservative school board hopefuls. Financed mostly by two conservative longtime philanthropists, John Crean and Howard F. Ahmanson Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only 10. That's how many candidates the conservative Education Alliance trained and supported to stand for election to school boards in Orange County this year. Four years ago, 36 ran and 13 won--enough to take a sixth of the county's school seats, with majorities in Garden Grove, Westminster and Orange. That was the year the Education Alliance burst onto the scene with its agenda of getting conservative Christian candidates onto school boards and instituting a back-to-basics, anti-union regime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only 10. That's how many candidates the conservative Education Alliance trained and supported to stand for election to school boards in Orange County this year. Four years ago, 36 ran and 13 won--enough to take a sixth of the county's school seats, with majorities in Garden Grove, Westminster and Orange. That was the year the Education Alliance burst onto the scene with its agenda of getting conservative Christian candidates onto school boards and instituting a back-to-basics, anti-union regime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994 | a Times Staff Writer
The leader of a conservative political group helping to finance Orange County school board campaigns said Friday that two Tustin Unified candidates originally listed as receiving contributions from the organization actually just bought space in a slate mailer from the group. Mark Bucher, the Tustin resident who heads the Education Alliance, said his group paid $350 each for candidates Jonathan W. Abelove and Jane Bauer to be included in an independent conservative slate mailer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1996 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aided by well-financed campaigns, two of three candidates backed by a conservative political group appear to have ousted incumbents in the county's nonpartisan Board of Education race, according to early returns in Tuesday's election. In Area 3, which includes the northwestern part of the county, accountant Eric H. Woolery led incumbent Joan S. Primrose, a retired teacher who conceded defeat before the vote count was completed. "The will of the voters has been done," said Primrose, 66.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1994
Within an article that was written about the Education Alliance ("Conservatives Take Best Shot at School Boards," Oct. 30) I was mentioned, giving the apparentness that I was part of an "extremist group" when in fact I don't know anyone else supported by the Education Alliance and their respective views. My first disagreement with your newspaper stems from this attitude: Somebody else said it, a staff writer wrote it, but they are not responsible for what they wrote. My second disagreement is an attempt to group me and the Education Alliance by association to a very general statement: "Their whole mission and purpose is anti-public education."
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Yorba Linda school trustee pops onto a campus to give teachers an unsolicited lecture on the importance of phonics instruction. Another "back-to-basics" crusader in Anaheim seeks to scuttle state-mandated bilingual education. Two more trustees of an Orange County education agency in Costa Mesa skewer a federal career program championed by President Clinton and a broad front of county business and school leaders.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A conservative political group is backing three candidates for the Orange County Board of Education, signaling an attempt to wrest control of the five-member panel from more moderate incumbents. The Education Alliance, a Tustin-based group that grew out of the failed school voucher initiative three years ago, says it will help finance a candidate for each of the three seats up for grabs in the March 26 election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1998
Your article ("Despite Hot Issues, School Races Stay Cool," Oct. 26) suggests the Education Alliance is on the decline because we are supporting "only" 24 school board candidates and have raised "only" $50,000. On the contrary. Most observers would consider those marks of vigorous activism. The Education Alliance is gradually breaking the teachers unions' stranglehold on our school boards. Every election, the unions lose a few more school board races. When we founded the alliance five years ago, only a handful of board members in this county were elected without union support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1998 | LIZ SEYMOUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You'd think the fall of bilingual education and the results of the first statewide exam given in four years would be ample political fodder for the school board campaign trail. But races in 21 Orange County districts have been particularly quiet this election cycle. In fact, five other school districts canceled elections altogether because they lacked enough candidates for a contest.
MAGAZINE
June 15, 1997 | Molly Selvin, Molly Selvin is an editorial writer for The Times
I was elected to the Walter Reed Middle School LEARN Council at Back-to-School Night in October 1995 because no one else volunteered for a vacant seat. I wish I could say that duty prompted me to declare my candidacy in front of an auditorium full of parents, but mostly I was driven by personal worries: Would my son, then 11, be safe on this crowded and worn North Hollywood campus? Would he find caring and dynamic teachers? Would he learn?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1997
Thanks to The Times for the March 17 article on the Education Alliance ("Conservative Activists Stir Up O.C. Education"). As a high school teacher who is active in my local teachers' association, I have observed the inroads made by Education Alliance candidates in the county with great concern. That many of these board members seem to have ideological axes to grind at the expense of the students in their districts should likewise concern everyone. Also, the fact that the Education Alliance is so heavily subsidized by Howard F. Ahmanson Jr. suggests that his personal philosophy is apt to be reflected in their choice of school board candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1997
I am encouraged by the emergence of organizations like the Education Alliance discussed in a front-page article in The Times on March 17. The tone of the article suggests that you oppose its objectives. For the average voter, identifying candidates for school boards who are truly committed to a conservative agenda is almost impossible. All of the brochures include the same bland statements. I hope that the Education Alliance will help us to select candidates who are truly interested in reform.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, Frank Ury raised about $4,000 and knocked on a lot of doors to win election to the Saddleback Valley Unified school board. Last year, the conservative activist from Mission Viejo and his allies spent more than 10 times that amount to defend his seat and boost two other candidates. It wasn't enough. A slate of centrist candidates and teacher-backed political groups knocked Ury out in November by spending what appears to be thousands of dollars more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1997
Thanks to The Times for the March 17 article on the Education Alliance ("Conservative Activists Stir Up O.C. Education"). As a high school teacher who is active in my local teachers' association, I have observed the inroads made by Education Alliance candidates in the county with great concern. That many of these board members seem to have ideological axes to grind at the expense of the students in their districts should likewise concern everyone. Also, the fact that the Education Alliance is so heavily subsidized by Howard F. Ahmanson Jr. suggests that his personal philosophy is apt to be reflected in their choice of school board candidates.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Yorba Linda school trustee pops onto a campus to give teachers an unsolicited lecture on the importance of phonics instruction. Another "back-to-basics" crusader in Anaheim seeks to scuttle state-mandated bilingual education. Two more trustees of an Orange County education agency in Costa Mesa skewer a federal career program championed by President Clinton and a broad front of county business and school leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | CATHY WERBLIN
The Board of Education's new conservative majority broke with custom this week and elected Bob Harden president of the five-member panel and Terry Cantrell its vice president. Incumbent member and vice president Lynn Hamtil had been in line to take the president's spot, as has been the board's practice in the past. Incumbents Harden and Cantrell, along with newly elected member Linda Paulsen, share views on a number of issues.
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