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Education Alternatives Inc

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1994 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Residents and union representatives blasted trustees of the Orange Unified School District last week for suggesting that some of the district's operations be privatized. "All of you are trustees of a public education system and that means you must be committed to public education--anything else would be outright fraud," said David Reger, president of the teachers' union.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1994 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Residents and union representatives blasted trustees of the Orange Unified School District last week for suggesting that some of the district's operations be privatized. "All of you are trustees of a public education system and that means you must be committed to public education--anything else would be outright fraud," said David Reger, president of the teachers' union.
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NEWS
October 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Over the protests of some teachers and parents, the school board voted Monday to put a private company in charge of its public school system, becoming the first city in the nation to do so. The Hartford Board of Education voted, 6 to 3, to sign a five-year contract with Education Alternatives Inc., making the publicly held company responsible for the education of 25,000 schoolchildren in this city of about 140,000.
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Over the protests of some teachers and parents, the school board voted Monday to put a private company in charge of its public school system, becoming the first city in the nation to do so. The Hartford Board of Education voted, 6 to 3, to sign a five-year contract with Education Alternatives Inc., making the publicly held company responsible for the education of 25,000 schoolchildren in this city of about 140,000.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Education Alternatives Inc. has traveled a rough road to reach Baltimore. The small Bloomington, Minn., company is trying to prove that private management of public schools can bring not only educational improvements but also financial profits. Since its start six years ago, however, the company has not had a profitable year--or even a profitable quarter--and had accumulated operating losses of $8.5 million by March, according to federal Securities and Exchange Commission documents.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Harlem Park Elementary School here, in a poverty-ravaged area of the nation's 13th-largest city, they are waiting for the promised benefits of a novel effort to turn around low-achieving schools. "Nothing's happening," third-grade teacher Gussie Goodman said recently. "We still do things the way we always did. We're just biding our time." Harlem Park is one of nine Baltimore public schools, most in poor neighborhoods, that are being managed by Education Alternatives Inc.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week, it happened in Baltimore. In the recent past, it was the same story in Miami; in Duluth, Minn., and in North Carolina. Beleaguered parents and public school officials agreed to share the keys to their classrooms with private entrepreneurs who promised to improve the quality of education for urban children while producing a profit for themselves.
NEWS
January 24, 1996 | Associated Press
A private company that once promised to turn around troubled public schools around the country received what could be a fatal blow Tuesday as Hartford school board members withdrew their support. Shares of Education Alternatives Inc. plunged 36% Tuesday on the news that it was losing its last remaining agreement, a contract to manage Hartford's schools. After an escalating debate over more than $10.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | From Associated Press
The school privatization experiment here is over--at least for now. More than halfway through one of the nation's largest experiments in school privatization, Baltimore terminated what's left of a five-year contract with Education Alternatives Inc., a company hired to run nine city schools. Schools Supt. Walter Amprey blamed the city's budget deficit for the decision. "I don't think that we're ruling out working with EAI or similar companies again," Amprey said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1994 | RUSS LOAR, LYNN FRANEY AND LESLEY WRIGHT
Issues coming up Newport Beach City Council Meeting When: Monday, 2 and 7 p.m. Where: Council chambers, 3300 Newport Blvd. What: The council will decide whether to create a public benefits corporation. The corporation would accept donations to the city from the public. The council will also have a public hearing on a proposed noise ordinance. The council will consider imposing a 6,000-pound weight limit for trucks on Marigold Avenue in Corona del Mar.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Education Alternatives Inc. has traveled a rough road to reach Baltimore. The small Bloomington, Minn., company is trying to prove that private management of public schools can bring not only educational improvements but also financial profits. Since its start six years ago, however, the company has not had a profitable year--or even a profitable quarter--and had accumulated operating losses of $8.5 million by March, according to federal Securities and Exchange Commission documents.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Harlem Park Elementary School here, in a poverty-ravaged area of the nation's 13th-largest city, they are waiting for the promised benefits of a novel effort to turn around low-achieving schools. "Nothing's happening," third-grade teacher Gussie Goodman said recently. "We still do things the way we always did. We're just biding our time." Harlem Park is one of nine Baltimore public schools, most in poor neighborhoods, that are being managed by Education Alternatives Inc.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week, it happened in Baltimore. In the recent past, it was the same story in Miami; in Duluth, Minn., and in North Carolina. Beleaguered parents and public school officials agreed to share the keys to their classrooms with private entrepreneurs who promised to improve the quality of education for urban children while producing a profit for themselves.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | KENNETH J. COOPER, THE WASHINGTON POST
At South Pointe Elementary School, the desks are never aligned in neat rows. No classroom is completely walled off from another. Each has a television, computer, telephone and a rocking chair in the reading corner. Each pupil at South Pointe will be assigned to one of four "communities," a school within the school, and spend all of his or her elementary years there. "We want to have an atmosphere like home," said Beth Rosenthal, a third-grade teacher. South Pointe opened here Sept.
NEWS
January 27, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hurricane Andrew forced the Hirsch family from their house temporarily in 1992, they enrolled their daughters in South Pointe Elementary, the first of a new breed of experimental public schools being operated by private companies. The family moved back to their more affluent neighborhood, but their daughters still travel to a blighted area of Miami Beach daily to attend South Pointe, where children learn at their own pace in an environment where competition is downplayed.
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