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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1994
Kudos to the Clinton Administration for changing the emphasis from interdiction to education and treatment in an effort to combat drug addiction. This change in direction is long overdue. Hopefully, prison space will also become available to incarcerate violent criminals--which should always be law enforcement's primary emphasis. JOSEPH B. BLUME Tustin
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2009 | Kimi Yoshino
Busloads of gay and lesbian protesters from across California are expected to converge on the state Capitol today to protest more than $80 million in proposed budget cuts to AIDS and HIV programs, a reduction that would wipe out state funding of most prevention, education and surveillance programs that help fight and track the disease.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2001
"Fighting a War Armed With Baby-Boomer Myths" (Opinion, Feb. 4) made some very good points regarding the problem of getting through all the exaggerations and fabrications surrounding the "war on drugs." The top priority should be treating addicts, whether they are teenagers or parents. When there is an addict in the family the whole family suffers. Putting addicts in prison does great harm and does nothing to solve the drug problem. As we learn more about the nature of addiction we realize that, given the right genetics, any one of us could be an addict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2001
"Fighting a War Armed With Baby-Boomer Myths" (Opinion, Feb. 4) made some very good points regarding the problem of getting through all the exaggerations and fabrications surrounding the "war on drugs." The top priority should be treating addicts, whether they are teenagers or parents. When there is an addict in the family the whole family suffers. Putting addicts in prison does great harm and does nothing to solve the drug problem. As we learn more about the nature of addiction we realize that, given the right genetics, any one of us could be an addict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995
Your Dec. 29 editorial, "Coping With the Great Flood," about the overburdened federal courts, gives three solutions, including the suggestion of increasing the number of judges from 846 to 4,000. You overlook the most obvious solution: Cut the caseload. Cut the caseload by the decriminalization of drugs, cut drug cases, i.e., sales and possession and drug-related cases, like burglaries, robberies, etc. We have spent $150 billion in a futile attempt to stop drugs and have more of them than ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1993
In your editorial (May 18) about the withdrawal of the Rev. Robert Schuller from the drug reform movement you said: "Legalization is clearly not the answer" (to the drug problem). What is? More money? On March 28, "60 Minutes" said: "The biggest disaster may be the war on drugs itself. Over a decade $100 billion has been spent and more Americans are addicted than ever before." The present criminalization of drugs program has wrecked our court systems, overburdened our police forces, the Coast Guard, and the military, filled our prisons with more than their capacities and funneled billions out of the U.S.!
OPINION
May 21, 1989
I am outraged by the anti-drug plan that Bennett has proposed for our nation. Bennett calls his program "consequences and confrontation," which mostly involves the incarceration of alleged drug users and the seizure of their personal property. Bennett gave only general encouragement for drug education and drug treatment, our two most important weapons if we ever hope to win this war on drugs. Let me state here that from 1972 until 1987 I was addicted to heroin and cocaine. No amount of incarceration ever deterred me from my drug-abusing life style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990
It is interesting that drug czar William Bennett (Part A, June 19) only gives California a C-minus on the narcotics-fighting grade scale. I think we can only give Bennett a grade of F for both his past performance as education secretary and for his current performance with regards to the war on drugs. Until Bennett and those who think like him start treating the cause of the drug problem (poverty, lack of education, a sense of hopelessness, etc.) instead of the symptoms, there will always be a problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1999
Re "AIDS Patient Pins Hopes on Pot Ruling," Sept. 20: I just finished reading about Peter McWilliams dying of AIDS and being refused access to medical marijuana. I find it abhorrent that this man, who is otherwise a law-abiding citizen, is being murdered by people carrying out the policies of our state and federal governments. Not only is the nation being deprived of valuable tax dollars that could be generated by the sale of medical marijuana, it is making criminals of law-abiding taxpayers, depriving them of their ability to make a living and contribute to their families and society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992
What we are doing is working! The war on drugs is not won, but we have been successful on many fronts, winning many battles, skirmishes and missions. The "war" must continue. Education is our weapon. The driving force behind our success is directly related to the involvement of business, law enforcement, education and treatment. These forces are working here in Orange County. This is evidenced by the dramatic reduction in heroin overdoses, cocaine overdoses, drug-related deaths and incidents of arrest for drug-related criminal offense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1999
Re "AIDS Patient Pins Hopes on Pot Ruling," Sept. 20: I just finished reading about Peter McWilliams dying of AIDS and being refused access to medical marijuana. I find it abhorrent that this man, who is otherwise a law-abiding citizen, is being murdered by people carrying out the policies of our state and federal governments. Not only is the nation being deprived of valuable tax dollars that could be generated by the sale of medical marijuana, it is making criminals of law-abiding taxpayers, depriving them of their ability to make a living and contribute to their families and society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995
Your Dec. 29 editorial, "Coping With the Great Flood," about the overburdened federal courts, gives three solutions, including the suggestion of increasing the number of judges from 846 to 4,000. You overlook the most obvious solution: Cut the caseload. Cut the caseload by the decriminalization of drugs, cut drug cases, i.e., sales and possession and drug-related cases, like burglaries, robberies, etc. We have spent $150 billion in a futile attempt to stop drugs and have more of them than ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1994
Kudos to the Clinton Administration for changing the emphasis from interdiction to education and treatment in an effort to combat drug addiction. This change in direction is long overdue. Hopefully, prison space will also become available to incarcerate violent criminals--which should always be law enforcement's primary emphasis. JOSEPH B. BLUME Tustin
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1993
In your editorial (May 18) about the withdrawal of the Rev. Robert Schuller from the drug reform movement you said: "Legalization is clearly not the answer" (to the drug problem). What is? More money? On March 28, "60 Minutes" said: "The biggest disaster may be the war on drugs itself. Over a decade $100 billion has been spent and more Americans are addicted than ever before." The present criminalization of drugs program has wrecked our court systems, overburdened our police forces, the Coast Guard, and the military, filled our prisons with more than their capacities and funneled billions out of the U.S.!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992
What we are doing is working! The war on drugs is not won, but we have been successful on many fronts, winning many battles, skirmishes and missions. The "war" must continue. Education is our weapon. The driving force behind our success is directly related to the involvement of business, law enforcement, education and treatment. These forces are working here in Orange County. This is evidenced by the dramatic reduction in heroin overdoses, cocaine overdoses, drug-related deaths and incidents of arrest for drug-related criminal offense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990
It is interesting that drug czar William Bennett (Part A, June 19) only gives California a C-minus on the narcotics-fighting grade scale. I think we can only give Bennett a grade of F for both his past performance as education secretary and for his current performance with regards to the war on drugs. Until Bennett and those who think like him start treating the cause of the drug problem (poverty, lack of education, a sense of hopelessness, etc.) instead of the symptoms, there will always be a problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1985
The inescapable conclusion to be drawn from your outstanding articles on the cocaine trade is that it is now totally out of control. The enormous profits involved in the traffic in illicit drugs make it the main source of crime and corruption in our society, and all of us pay a cruel price for this. We need a radically different approach, starting with recognition that drug abuse has to be seen primarily as a medical rather than a criminal problem. Drug use--including abuse--is a human predilection that laws will never effectively control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1986
We would like to thank you for your strong editorial supporting drug treatment programs. Those of us who work in the field have felt the impact of funding cuts over recent years and have been warned to expect further reductions in government funding at all levels. This is happening at precisely the time when more and more young people with very serious drug problems are approaching us for help. The myth that the private sector will pick up the burden is exactly that--a myth.
OPINION
May 21, 1989
I am outraged by the anti-drug plan that Bennett has proposed for our nation. Bennett calls his program "consequences and confrontation," which mostly involves the incarceration of alleged drug users and the seizure of their personal property. Bennett gave only general encouragement for drug education and drug treatment, our two most important weapons if we ever hope to win this war on drugs. Let me state here that from 1972 until 1987 I was addicted to heroin and cocaine. No amount of incarceration ever deterred me from my drug-abusing life style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1986
We would like to thank you for your strong editorial supporting drug treatment programs. Those of us who work in the field have felt the impact of funding cuts over recent years and have been warned to expect further reductions in government funding at all levels. This is happening at precisely the time when more and more young people with very serious drug problems are approaching us for help. The myth that the private sector will pick up the burden is exactly that--a myth.
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