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Education Commission Of The States

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Piedad F. Robertson, president of Santa Monica College since 1995, announced her retirement Wednesday and said she would become president of the Education Commission of the States, a Denver-based nonpartisan education group. In addition to presiding over the 25,000-student community college, Robertson served on Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's 2003 transition team.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Piedad F. Robertson, president of Santa Monica College since 1995, announced her retirement Wednesday and said she would become president of the Education Commission of the States, a Denver-based nonpartisan education group. In addition to presiding over the 25,000-student community college, Robertson served on Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's 2003 transition team.
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NEWS
December 17, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philanthropist Walter H. Annenberg is expected to announce today the largest gift ever given to benefit education, a $500-million series of grants for school reform projects. President Clinton and Education Secretary Richard W. Riley will join the former publishing magnate and ambassador to Britain during the Richard Nixon Administration at the White House today to discuss the grants, which are to be made to several education groups seeking to improve elementary and secondary schooling.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philanthropist Walter H. Annenberg is expected to announce today the largest gift ever given to benefit education, a $500-million series of grants for school reform projects. President Clinton and Education Secretary Richard W. Riley will join the former publishing magnate and ambassador to Britain during the Richard Nixon Administration at the White House today to discuss the grants, which are to be made to several education groups seeking to improve elementary and secondary schooling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chui L. Tsang, 54, president of San Jose City College, was chosen Monday to be the next president of Santa Monica College, effective in February. Tsang previously was dean of the school of applied science and technology at the City College of San Francisco. She also has taught at Stanford University and San Francisco State. At Santa Monica, he will succeed Piedad F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Tsu, 80, the China-born political science professor and former chairman of President Bush's Advisory Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islanders, died Saturday in a hospital in Daly City, Calif., of unspecified causes. Born Dec. 1, 1924, in rural China, Tsu earned a law degree from the University of Tokyo in 1946, and then moved to the U.S.
NATIONAL
July 6, 2003 | From Associated Press
Every child should be required to attend kindergarten and should be offered free pre-kindergarten, the nation's largest teachers union says. National Education Assn. delegates called for the broad expansion in early childhood learning during their annual business meeting last week. Left open was how local, state and federal governments would raise the money to pay for it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Frank Newman, a former president of the Education Commission of the States and a pioneering reformer of higher education, has died. Newman, 77, developed melanoma several months ago and died May 29 at the Miriam Hospital in Providence, R.I., said his longtime friend, Arthur F. Levine. Newman had been a resident of Jamestown, R.I. Levine, president of Teachers College at Columbia University in New York City, said Newman "may have been the most influential person in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Maxine Pierce Frost, 76, who served 40 years as a trustee in the Riverside Unified School District, died Nov. 27 of cancer at her home in Riverside, according to her son, Doug. Elected to the board of trustees in 1967, Frost saw the Riverside district grow from about 23,000 students to 43,000 during her tenure. A native of Janesville, Wis., Frost was a young girl when she moved with her parents to California.
NEWS
May 24, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
A blue-ribbon commission including former Presidents Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Carter warned Monday that the nation is "moving backward" in its struggle for racial equality and called for making minority education a renewed national priority. Twenty years ago, the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders headed by then-Illinois Gov. Otto Kerner issued an assessment of a nation divided by race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1988
To mobilize students and faculties in the fight against illiteracy and homelessness, Cal State Fullerton and Chapman College have joined 40 other California universities and colleges in a new statewide organization called the California Compact. Under the auspices of the organization, students and faculty members will tutor illiterates, work in shelters for the homeless and participate in other service projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987
Cal State Fullerton is one of eight campuses named by a national educational commission to take part in a national campaign against illiteracy. The national pilot project is being sponsored by the Education Commission of the States. The other participating universities are UCLA; Bethany College in Kansas; Centre College in Kentucky; Cornell University and Vassar College, both in New York; Maricopa Community College in Arizona, and Princeton University in New Jersey.
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