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Education Cuts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1992
Memo to our governor and legislators: If you think the cost of education is high, wait until you see the cost of ignorance. JACK J. HEEGER Huntington Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown may still pull out a victory for his beleaguered tax measure. Then he can tell all us kibitzers to go eat a big Thanksgiving plate of crow. Polls show "yes" votes in the high 40s with the "no" side in the low 40s. Ordinarily that's trouble, especially for a tax increase, because uncertain voters tend to settle on "no. " But most undecided people in this case are women, and women tend to support Brown's measure. So it's still a tossup. I'll be voting for Proposition 30. That's because although it's bad policy to worsen the state's tax instability by leaning even more heavily on the rich, a "no" vote means yanking $5.4 billion from K-12 schools and community colleges, plus $500 million from public universities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Let's cut through all the baloney being spread in California's tax brawl and go straight to what's basically at stake. At stake, at least in the near future, is whether public school funding will be slashed from kindergarten through the universities. If Gov. Jerry Brown's Proposition 30 passes - and receives more votes than wealthy attorney Molly Munger's Prop. 38 - K-12 schools and community colleges will be spared $5.4 billion in budget cuts. Plus, the two university systems won't be dinged $250 million each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Let's cut through all the baloney being spread in California's tax brawl and go straight to what's basically at stake. At stake, at least in the near future, is whether public school funding will be slashed from kindergarten through the universities. If Gov. Jerry Brown's Proposition 30 passes - and receives more votes than wealthy attorney Molly Munger's Prop. 38 - K-12 schools and community colleges will be spared $5.4 billion in budget cuts. Plus, the two university systems won't be dinged $250 million each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991
We are writing this letter to tell you about how we, a fourth-grade bilingual class, feel about Gov. Pete Wilson cutting the money for education in California. We're concerned about our education as well as the education of many others. We want Gov. Wilson to understand the way we feel about our education. We feel badly about many teachers losing their jobs. They studied long and hard to become teachers and help children and their futures. As kids, we know how important our teachers are to us. They teach us many things that a child needs to learn for the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1991
Hundreds of people, including students, teachers, administrators and support staff, marched before school Wednesday to demand that state lawmakers find ways to avoid huge spending cuts in education. Culver City Unified School District Superintendent Curtis Rethmeyer couldn't recall a time when management and labor were united with parents and students on an issue. "Not in my memory, at least, and that goes about 20 years back. So that's really something, I think," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS
Democratic state Senate candidate Hank Starr charged Friday that his opponent, Assemblywoman Cathie Wright (R-Simi Valley), helped push through funding cuts that will devastate public education in California. Starr, who is opposing Wright for the 19th district state seat being vacated by Ed Davis, lambasted the assemblywoman in a prepared statement.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying they are embarrassed and frustrated by the failure of Gov. Pete Wilson and legislative leaders to resolve the state's budget impasse, an influential Assembly Democrat and a key Senate Republican offered a compromise plan Thursday that could help break the deadlock. The plan, advanced by Democratic Assemblyman Phillip Isenberg of Sacramento and Republican Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- California's tax revenue plummeted in July, missing expectations by nearly $539 million and raising fears that deep education cuts will be needed to keep the state budget balanced. The bad news, announced Tuesday, came less than two months after Gov. Jerry Brown and state lawmakers patched together a budget on the assumption that a budding economic recovery would produce a $4-billion revenue windfall. Those hopes are now fading. The plunge occurred before the recent Wall Street gyrations that wiped away many of the year's stock-market gains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1992
I'm a 10th-grader at Belmont High School and I'm really upset about cutting teachers' salaries. We don't want teachers to work so hard and to get paid less money. All of my teachers are very upset about that. All of my teachers feel demoralized because of their salaries being cut. In addition, all of my classes are getting larger. Before, there were about 35 students in each class. Now, there are about 45 or more. All of my friends are upset too. We walked from the school to City Hall to protest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Democratic legislators read the polls. They heard the voters of San Jose and San Diego - San Jose, for crying out loud, a Democratic bastion. They understand that voters everywhere are demanding public pension reform. And they will deliver. They promise. It's just that it probably will not be before they start a monthlong recess July 3. Pencil in late August, just before they knock off for the year. You might have thought there'd be a greater sense of urgency by the majority party in the state Capitol, given that on June 5 voters in San Jose and San Diego, by landslide margins, adopted dramatic cutbacks to their city pension plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Board of Education approved a preliminary, worst-case $6-billion budget Tuesday, a plan that would eliminate thousands of jobs, close all of the district's adult schools and cut some after-school and arts programs. But Supt. John Deasy presented a less severe deficit than initially expected to the board and several scenarios that would restore millions in funding and save some programs from either elimination or partial cuts before the budget is finalized. Much of that, however, is contingent on voters' passing the governor's tax initiative in November, which he hopes would stave off more education cuts.
OPINION
March 7, 2012
Whatever happened to Occupy Wall Street? Are you folks still out there? Yes, the economy seems to be improving and thus the power of your message has been slightly blunted. But as a political force that could rally the nation on behalf of the 99%, who tend not to contribute huge sums to campaigns and so have less influence than their numbers deserve, you're still badly needed. In Los Angeles and nationwide, there are still sputtering signs that the Occupy movement hasn't disappeared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2012 | Chris Megerian
Thousands of students and activists marched on the state Capitol on Monday to protest cuts in higher education, and authorities arrested 68 of them who refused to leave the building after it closed in the evening. Four had been arrested earlier in the day, one on suspicion of possessing a switchblade. The demonstration, billed by some as an "occupy the Capitol" act and supported by a freewheeling coalition of student groups and labor unions, was the latest sign of simmering discontent over steady hikes in the cost of attending state universities and community colleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2011 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Berkeley and Fullerton -- As Occupy Wall Street campers faced off with authorities around the nation, students on several California university campuses rallied in solidarity with the movement and to protest education cuts and rising tuition. The largest event was at UC Berkeley, where more than 1,200 singing, sign-waving students and faculty members rallied for much of the day on Sproul Plaza, site of the 1960s Free Speech Movement. At one point, the demonstrators chanted "Hey, hey, ho, ho, police violence has got to go," a reference to an incident last week in which baton-wielding police officers stopped an Occupy camp from being set up on the campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2011 | Hector Tobar
One day we may remember this as the season when the "Occupy Generation" came of age. Encampments inspired by Occupy Wall Street have sprouted across the country: Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Austin, Texas — and, of course, the one killing the lawn outside Los Angeles City Hall. But this upwelling of righteous anger against corporate power isn't going to be enough to bring down the Bastille of plutocracy. Not yet. That's the conclusion I reached after visiting Cal State Dominguez Hills this week.
OPINION
November 8, 2008
Re "A new formula for algebra," editorial, Oct. 31 Thank you for the clear and informative editorial that makes such an excellent case for rescinding the eighth-grade algebra requirement. When I heard there would be more education cuts, I wondered how Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the state Board of Education were going to justify keeping the mandate. My two children are both taking algebra, but one is in middle school and the other is in high school. They are learning algebra at the right time for each of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- California's tax revenue plummeted in July, missing expectations by nearly $539 million and raising fears that deep education cuts will be needed to keep the state budget balanced. The bad news, announced Tuesday, came less than two months after Gov. Jerry Brown and state lawmakers patched together a budget on the assumption that a budding economic recovery would produce a $4-billion revenue windfall. Those hopes are now fading. The plunge occurred before the recent Wall Street gyrations that wiped away many of the year's stock-market gains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Fewer than 1 in 5 of the children who relied on free or reduced-price lunches during the 2009-2010 school year in California received subsidized meals last July, according to a new report. That represents a 15% drop in participation in summer meals programs from the year before at a time when enrollment in other federal nutrition programs is increasing because of the lingering effects of the recession. The report by California Food Policy Advocates blamed cuts to the state's education budget, which caused many school districts to eliminate summer learning and enrichment programs.
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