Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEducation Cuts
IN THE NEWS

Education Cuts

BUSINESS
May 2, 1991 | ANNE MICHAUD
National Education Corp. on Wednesday reported a net loss of $5.6 million for its first quarter, ended March 31, which is an improvement over a $8.4-million loss in the same period the year before. Jack Polley, a company spokesman, said cost reduction is responsible for stemming losses of the struggling training and education company, headquartered in Irvine. The company also reported first-quarter revenue of $84.7 million, compared to $85.4 million for the same period in 1990.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2009 | Howard Blume and Jason Song
Thousands of teachers and other union members rallied Thursday at Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles to oppose state and local cuts to education that are widely expected to result in larger classes for students as well as layoffs and more expensive healthcare. Most of the rhetoric blistered Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and his proposed budget, but speakers also took aim at the Los Angeles Unified School District and schools Supt. Ramon C. Cortines. "Mr.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Education programs that teach teen-agers to resist social pressure can prevent or reduce the use of cigarettes and marijuana but seem to have little effect on alcohol consumption among young adolescents, according to a major study reported today in the journal Science. Conducted by researchers at the RAND Corp.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local health education programs costing a couple of dollars per person each year can reduce rates of high blood pressure, smoking and blood cholesterol significantly, Stanford University doctors said Tuesday. A research team that studied the effects of a five-year health-consciousness media blitz in Monterey and Salinas said slick TV spots, gimmicky contests and newspaper columns touting the benefits of exercise and a controlled diet can persuade people to practice more healthful habits.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
In his most ideological budget yet, Republican Gov. George Deukmejian embraced the state's constitutionally required spending limit Thursday by proposing a virtually no-growth $39-billion fiscal plan that calls for slashing or eliminating Democratic-supported health and education programs.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When asked how they would most like to see local schools spend a hypothetical budget surplus, 35% of the respondents to The Times Technology Poll chose reducing class sizes. Computers for the classroom were the second-most popular choice, at 19%--virtually the same percentage as higher pay for teachers (18%)--and higher than the number who selected books and other course materials (13%) or improving school buildings (7%). The results reflect support for Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
In an effort to keep their district financially solvent, Santa Paula Union High School District administrators have proposed slashing more than $273,000 in jobs and instructional programs for the next school year, bringing next year's proposed cuts to more than $540,000. More than 100 people crowded the small school board meeting room on Wednesday to express their frustration with the cuts, which district officials blamed on a $232,000 shortfall of state money.
OPINION
January 18, 1987 | GARY K. HART, Gary K. Hart (D-Santa Barbara) chairs the state Senate Education Committee
Children attending public schools in Mississippi or Oklahoma have a better chance of receiving individual attention from their teachers than do students in California. In fact, with the possible exception of Utah, California has the largest number of students per class in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2009 | Evan Halper
Democratic leaders emerged from late-night budget negotiations Tuesday to announce they were closing in on a final agreement on how to address the state's $26.3-billion deficit. They said they planned to complete their work by morning. "We are prepared to be here all night," said Assembly Speaker Karen Bass (D-Los Angeles). "I don't think there is anything that would make negotiations shut down at this point."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Northridge students upset over cuts in the state higher education budget were urged Thursday to vent their anger in the polling booth by speakers at a voter registration rally sponsored by the state Democratic Party. Celebrity speakers and a rock band drew about 300 of the school's 28,000 students to the noontime rally that California Democratic Party organizers said kicks off a statewide campaign to persuade more college students to vote in the Nov. 3 election.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|