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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan urged federal legislators and the Bush administration Wednesday to provide more school money to Los Angeles--a mission that yielded no immediate results, but reflected Riordan's determination to campaign for education right to the end of his mayoral term. Riordan, who leaves office July 1, joined the mayors of Detroit, Chicago, St. Paul, Minn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2003 | Peter Nicholas, Dan Morain and Evan Halper, Times Staff Writers
Gov.-elect Arnold Schwarzenegger made two appointments Monday that will help define his administration, naming former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan as education secretary while hiring away Florida's budget chief to serve as state finance director. Having promised a fresh approach to governing, Schwarzenegger turned to two people steeped in the duties of public office, but removed from the political culture in Sacramento.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second probe into how the state Department of Education administers its adult education program and whether potentially millions were misused by community groups that offer adult classes was launched Monday by a state Legislature committee. State Sen. Raymond M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan urged federal legislators and the Bush administration Wednesday to provide more school money to Los Angeles--a mission that yielded no immediate results, but reflected Riordan's determination to campaign for education right to the end of his mayoral term. Riordan, who leaves office July 1, joined the mayors of Detroit, Chicago, St. Paul, Minn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1999 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim school trustee who wants to bill Mexico for the education of illegal immigrants said Thursday that he wants to broaden his plan to seek reimbursement from other countries as well. At a meeting marked by protests from some activists, Anaheim Union High School District board President Harald G. Martin introduced a plan calling for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, or INS, to count students who are in the U.S. illegally.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | KEITH LOVE, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an effort "to make California schools the best in the world," California Democratic gubernatorial candidate John K. Van de Kamp on Monday proposed the creation of 4,000 annual fellowships for students and others who want to become teachers. Calling for a California teacher corps, Atty. Gen. Van de Kamp said in a speech to the education department at UCLA, "I propose that we pay the full cost of up to two years of college plus a year of graduate work toward teacher certification.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
It seems that every decade must be known for one thing--whether it is the "free love" of the 1960s or the greed of the 1980s. One investment expert maintains that the 1990s will become known for a newfound emphasis on culture and education. If you talk to young parents, you'll probably see some evidence of this theory. It seems that nearly every new or soon-to-be parent is talking about signing the children up for school when they're practically still in the womb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Building Industry Assn. of Southern California on Wednesday filed suit against Saddleback Valley Unified School District, charging that officials are trying to collect nearly twice what the state allows in developer fees. The lawsuit, filed in Orange County Superior Court, claims that district officials embarked on a "comprehensive scheme" to deny builders certificates of compliance--prerequisites for obtaining building permits--unless they pay fees higher than those allowed by state law.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise concert announcement Sunday, Ernest Fleischmann set a virtual death watch on the 10-year-old Los Angeles Philharmonic Institute. The Philharmonic managing director told a Hollywood Bowl audience that unless $250,000 is raised by Oct. 31, the training program will cease to exist, at least in its present form.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The nation's schools and colleges will spend a record $353 billion in the coming year, more than double the amount of a decade ago, the government said Wednesday in its annual back-to-school report. Although school enrollments have remained flat nationwide since 1980, the report said, spending for education has continued to rise, easily outpacing inflation. In the 1979-80 school year, the nation spent $166 billion for education.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2000 | EILEEN AMBROSE, BALTIMORE SUN
Colleges will churn out thousands of graduates this month, and for some, financial realities are quickly setting in. Many pressures are hitting at once: Some grads will be knocked off their parents' health insurance policies; others face higher rent and the need to buy a car. Besides the expense of getting started on their own, students today commonly graduate with thousands of dollars in credit card debt.
NEWS
February 8, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A congressman unveiled legislation Monday that would require the federal government to fulfill a 25-year-old pledge to pay its share for special education. Congress promised in 1975 to pay 40% of the costs of educating children with disabilities, but it has never allocated funds to cover more than 13% of the tab.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1999 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim school trustee who wants to bill Mexico for the education of illegal immigrants said Thursday that he wants to broaden his plan to seek reimbursement from other countries as well. At a meeting marked by protests from some activists, Anaheim Union High School District board President Harald G. Martin introduced a plan calling for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, or INS, to count students who are in the U.S. illegally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Lowering interest rates on students loans captured most of the attention earlier this month when President Clinton signed a bill that revisited federal higher education programs for the first time since 1992. But Congress tucked a few other things into the bill's 668 pages. Take campus crime, for example. Congress stripped colleges of some of the artful dodges used to keep criminal activity--and the results of campus disciplinary proceedings--from public view. Or consider teacher training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second probe into how the state Department of Education administers its adult education program and whether potentially millions were misused by community groups that offer adult classes was launched Monday by a state Legislature committee. State Sen. Raymond M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998 | SUE ANNE PRESSLEY, WASHINGTON POST
The marching band at Dysart High School has had to fold, and there would have been no football team last fall--or basketball team this winter--had nearby residents not chipped in. At the middle and elementary schools, physical education and music are no longer taught. And throughout the 4,300-student Dysart district, equipment is lacking and teachers are leaving for better-paying jobs.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
The current level of state spending for public schools will do little more than ensure continued educational mediocrity, according to an analysis released Tuesday by an independent group of education professors from the state's top universities. With enrollment statewide growing 42% above what had been projected for this year, the state needs to provide an extra $20.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Lowering interest rates on students loans captured most of the attention earlier this month when President Clinton signed a bill that revisited federal higher education programs for the first time since 1992. But Congress tucked a few other things into the bill's 668 pages. Take campus crime, for example. Congress stripped colleges of some of the artful dodges used to keep criminal activity--and the results of campus disciplinary proceedings--from public view. Or consider teacher training.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The nation's colleges and universities could be forced to turn away half the potential student population by 2015, according to a new report that says budget shortfalls threaten to shut out the poor. The report, "Breaking the Social Contract: The Fiscal Crisis in Higher Education," urges far-reaching reforms for post-secondary institutions and calls for increased public funding to keep down tuition. Americans ignore these problems at their peril, the report concludes.
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
State Controller Kathleen Connell on Monday ordered top-to-bottom audits of the state's prison system and the Department of Education. She also announced that a full-scale examination of the Medi-Cal program already is under way. She said the probes were necessary to "eliminate any hint of conflict of interest and to maximize savings." "These are the most significant portions of the state budget, and they are the fastest growing," Connell said.
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