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Education Secretary Arne Duncan

NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- As he weighed a shift in his public position on gay marriage, perhaps no one had as much influence on President Obama as his wife, Michelle. "This is something that, you know, we've talked about over the years and she, you know, she feels the same way, she feels the same way that I do," Obama told ABC's Robin Roberts on Wednesday. Even as Obama's position was in a state of evolution, White House advisors said, the first lady went out of her way to invite gay, lesbian, transgendered and bisexual couples to the events she sponsored for military families.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Ten U.S. colleges and universities have committed to provide more information to students about tuition and other costs, including estimated monthly loan payments after graduation, as part of a federal push to improve disclosure to help prevent financial-aid recipients from overextending themselves, the White House said. Leaders from those institutions, which include the state university systems in Maryland, Massachusetts, New York and Texas, were scheduled meet Tuesday in Washington with Vice President Joe Biden, Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to discuss financial aid transparency.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
MOORESVILLE, N.C. - President Obama on Thursday pledged to bring high-speed Internet to nearly all students in their classrooms within five years, calling on the Federal Communications Commission to expand an existing initiative that will help school systems cover the cost. Speaking to students at Mooresville Middle School, Obama argued that such access would improve learning opportunities for students all over the country. “We can't be stuck in the 19th century when we're living in a 20th-century economy,” he said.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2013 | By Shan Li
Fifteen-year-old students in the U.S. lag behind many countries around the world when it comes to reading, science and math, according to test results released Tuesday. The scores, which place the U.S. in the middle of the global pack, showed little change from American students who have taken the test over the past decade. At the top of the rankings are Asian countries including South Korea, Japan and Singapore. The Chinese city of Shanghai scored the highest average scores in each subject matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2010
SATURDAY The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer The Middle East, poverty, his diet: President Bill Clinton 3 p.m. CNN McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Today Filmmaker Davis Guggenheim ("Waiting for 'Superman'"); filmmaker Ken Burns. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union With Candy Crowley Midterm elections, Bush tax cuts: Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.); midterm elections, the "tea party": Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Half an hour into the Fox News-Google News debate, Rick Perry and Mitt Romney finally had their first skirmish - and to no one's surprise, it came over Social Security. Perry again tried to reassure current Social Security beneficiaries and those who soon would be eligible that they had nothing to worry about. And he accused Romney of distorting his past statements on the issue and suggesting he would like states to assume responsibility for the program. “Not the first time Mitt's been wrong on some issue,” Perry said.
OPINION
March 4, 2010
California's public schools, which are laying off thousands of teachers and planning for shortened academic years, received the painful news Thursday that they will not get a federal Race to the Top grant in the first round of funding. The decision isn't surprising, though. The legislation that formed the backbone of the state's application lacked coherence and a real commitment to improving conditions at the lowest-performing schools. We don't yet know why U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan turned down California's application.
OPINION
May 27, 2009
Re "Education secretary says students in peril," May 23 So U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan believes that California must get serious about his favored reform projects before we can expect any more help? That's like saying the Titanic needed a better orchestra. Projected class sizes of 40-plus students per class next year in L.A. Unified make ideas such as merit pay, reconstituting "failing" schools and "small learning communities" to be spectacularly beside the point. Laying off thousands of teachers will render permanent damage to education in California.
OPINION
November 4, 2009
If California schools want a piece of $4.2 million in new federal education grants, they'll have to make some changes. Legislation by state Sen. Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) and several coauthors would pave the way for those changes, but the bill is so awkwardly constructed at this point, with so many unnecessary and possibly harmful additions, that it doesn't deserve the fast-track passage Romero is seeking. The bill moves in the right direction in enacting common-sense reforms that were outlined by U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan as requirements for states that want to compete for Race to the Top grants.
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