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NEWS
August 2, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antsy teen-agers who are chafing to finish driver training classes at high school and take Dad's car for a spin may have to wait a lot longer now as a result of slashes made to the state budget by Gov. George Deukmejian. On Tuesday, the governor cut a $21-million program that funds the majority of high school driver training courses. About 90% of all school districts currently offer such training, said a spokesman for state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig.
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NEWS
May 23, 1995 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson, in a revision to his state budget, proposed accelerating deep cuts to welfare on Monday, while continuing to push for a $7.6-billion tax cut and an increase for public schools--education's first increase in four years. Wilson, still recovering from throat surgery, did not appear at a news conference at which his revised budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 was released. But Finance Director Russell Gould said the updated $56-billion budget reflects a continued belief that California's economy is improving.
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NEWS
July 29, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finally ending a prolonged stalemate, the Legislature passed and sent Gov. George Deukmejian a $55-billion state budget Saturday along with a host of tax-increase and spending-reduction bills necessary to balance the plan. The budget, coming a record 28 days into the 1990-91 budget year, won final approval late Saturday night by a Senate vote of 29 to 8. The Assembly voted its approval, 55 to 14, just after midnight Friday after a long, bitter debate.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antsy teen-agers who are chafing to finish driver training classes at high school and take Dad's car for a spin may have to wait a lot longer now as a result of slashes made to the state budget by Gov. George Deukmejian. On Tuesday, the governor cut a $21-million program that funds the majority of high school driver training courses. About 90% of all school districts currently offer such training, said a spokesman for state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prolonged budget negotiations between Gov. George Deukmejian and legislative leaders came to an end Friday with an agreement that calls for roughly $2.3 billion in spending cuts, nearly $850 million in tax and fee increases and enactment of legislation giving governors broad new authority to make budget cuts in future years. But passage of the agreement, which came on the 27th day the state had operated without a budget, is not assured.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
Unless education gets a better deal, school leaders say, a complex agreement on transportation and education financing recently negotiated by Gov. George Deukmejian and the Legislature will not have their support when it goes to the voters. "Right now, I'd say the whole deal is up in the air," Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said in an interview. "They cooked us on some issues. Why should we sign on now unless we see some evidence of good faith?"
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Taking a sharp crack at what he termed California's "piggy" education lobby, former Secretary of Education William J. Bennett urged Wednesday that the state divert funding guaranteed for educational programs so that it could better afford an extensive agenda of anti-drug programs. "Why is it decreed from on high that in any year, no matter what else happens, education is entitled to the lion's share?" Bennett asked.
NEWS
March 6, 1987 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
The Assembly on Thursday passed legislation to restore $76.2 million in state school aid in a move to thwart Gov. George Deukmejian's effort to force the use of state retirement system funds to pay for education and other programs. A 53-19 bipartisan vote sent the measure, authored by Assemblywoman Teresa P. Hughes (D-Los Angeles), to the Senate, which previously approved similar legislation that, in effect, would override the governor's veto.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | Max Boot, Times staff writer
During the last month of fiscal debate, state programs big and small came under the budget knife. Some took heavy cuts, some took fatal wounds and some were in danger but ducked in time to survive intact. A few programs, such as prisons, will gain funds from the 10% spending increase this fiscal year. But Gov. George Deukmejian this week is expected to target at least $418 million in cuts in addition to the $2.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY and LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite Proposition 98, the voter-approved measure that guarantees a minimum funding level for the state's elementary and secondary schools, spending per pupil would decline slightly next year in the budget proposed Wednesday by Gov. George Deukmejian. Per-pupil spending would drop from $3,987 in the current year to $3,968 next year, adjusted for inflation.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | Max Boot, Times staff writer
During the last month of fiscal debate, state programs big and small came under the budget knife. Some took heavy cuts, some took fatal wounds and some were in danger but ducked in time to survive intact. A few programs, such as prisons, will gain funds from the 10% spending increase this fiscal year. But Gov. George Deukmejian this week is expected to target at least $418 million in cuts in addition to the $2.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finally ending a prolonged stalemate, the Legislature passed and sent Gov. George Deukmejian a $55-billion state budget Saturday along with a host of tax-increase and spending-reduction bills necessary to balance the plan. The budget, coming a record 28 days into the 1990-91 budget year, won final approval late Saturday night by a Senate vote of 29 to 8. The Assembly voted its approval, 55 to 14, just after midnight Friday after a long, bitter debate.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prolonged budget negotiations between Gov. George Deukmejian and legislative leaders came to an end Friday with an agreement that calls for roughly $2.3 billion in spending cuts, nearly $850 million in tax and fee increases and enactment of legislation giving governors broad new authority to make budget cuts in future years. But passage of the agreement, which came on the 27th day the state had operated without a budget, is not assured.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State officials angrily demanded Thursday that alcoholic beverage interests fighting a proposed tax increase withdraw a television commercial that implies that the California Lottery has failed to provide the funds for education as its promoters promised. Joanne McNabb, communications manager for the California Lottery, said the new ads are misleading and inaccurate because they suggest that the lottery has not given any money to schools.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY and LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite Proposition 98, the voter-approved measure that guarantees a minimum funding level for the state's elementary and secondary schools, spending per pupil would decline slightly next year in the budget proposed Wednesday by Gov. George Deukmejian. Per-pupil spending would drop from $3,987 in the current year to $3,968 next year, adjusted for inflation.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
Unless education gets a better deal, school leaders say, a complex agreement on transportation and education financing recently negotiated by Gov. George Deukmejian and the Legislature will not have their support when it goes to the voters. "Right now, I'd say the whole deal is up in the air," Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said in an interview. "They cooked us on some issues. Why should we sign on now unless we see some evidence of good faith?"
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Democrats on the Senate Appropriations Committee shot down a proposed amendment by Gov. George Deukmejian on Monday and approved legislation that would provide an additional $50 million to continue English and civics classes for immigrants. The committee vote was along party lines, with eight Democrats voting for the measure and three Republicans opposed. But ultimately, the legislation will need Republican votes, because it requires two-thirds majorities in both the Senate and Assembly.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson, in a revision to his state budget, proposed accelerating deep cuts to welfare on Monday, while continuing to push for a $7.6-billion tax cut and an increase for public schools--education's first increase in four years. Wilson, still recovering from throat surgery, did not appear at a news conference at which his revised budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 was released. But Finance Director Russell Gould said the updated $56-billion budget reflects a continued belief that California's economy is improving.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Taking a sharp crack at what he termed California's "piggy" education lobby, former Secretary of Education William J. Bennett urged Wednesday that the state divert funding guaranteed for educational programs so that it could better afford an extensive agenda of anti-drug programs. "Why is it decreed from on high that in any year, no matter what else happens, education is entitled to the lion's share?" Bennett asked.
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Democrats on the Senate Appropriations Committee shot down a proposed amendment by Gov. George Deukmejian on Monday and approved legislation that would provide an additional $50 million to continue English and civics classes for immigrants. The committee vote was along party lines, with eight Democrats voting for the measure and three Republicans opposed. But ultimately, the legislation will need Republican votes, because it requires two-thirds majorities in both the Senate and Assembly.
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