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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1991 | ANITA M. CAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 14, Jackie Cervantes can already rattle off a list of friends who have dropped out of school and are struggling to survive on meager wages--that is, if they have a job at all. But Cervantes, an eighth-grader at Sierra Intermediate School, says that's not the route for her, certainly not since taking a class at school that shows students how hard it is to find a well-paying job without a high school diploma. "Dropping out is dumb.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
If you're expecting, it's time to start saving. With the majority of college graduates stuck with overwhelming student-loan debt, new parents would be wise to save as early as possible, according to a report by credit.com, a personal finance and credit-card comparison website. Between 2000 and 2010, the cost of a college education increased 35%, according to the 2011 Digest of Education Statistics. The cost of a private college education is already hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, and will likely increase significantly by the time today's baby enters college.
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BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
If you're expecting, it's time to start saving. With the majority of college graduates stuck with overwhelming student-loan debt, new parents would be wise to save as early as possible, according to a report by credit.com, a personal finance and credit-card comparison website. Between 2000 and 2010, the cost of a college education increased 35%, according to the 2011 Digest of Education Statistics. The cost of a private college education is already hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, and will likely increase significantly by the time today's baby enters college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996
The California Department of Education has some troubling news for the San Fernando Valley and the Los Angeles Unified School District as a whole. The problem, however, is that we really don't know how troubling it is. As a story by Times staff writer Lucille Renwick points out, Valley high school students are spending less and less time in vocational education courses, even as fewer Valley high school graduates are going on to state colleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pint-sized women's revolution is taking place in science classrooms all across Orange County. Girls are dropping "yuck" and "ick" from their science class lingo and are dissecting frogs and dismantling batteries with as much gusto as their male counterparts. "Girls don't have to be frilly and nice and clean in their science classes," said Dorothy Terman, science coordinator for the Irvine Unified School District. "In fact, we want them to get messy. Why should boys have all the fun?"
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A limited plan allowing pupils to cross district lines to attend public schools of their choice is part of the complicated budget negotiations under way between Gov. Pete Wilson and the Legislature. The proposal, developed by Assemblyman Charles W. Quackenbush (R-Saratoga) and revised by the governor's office in recent days, would allow students to transfer into districts that are willing to accept them, but only under certain conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996
The California Department of Education has some troubling news for the San Fernando Valley and the Los Angeles Unified School District as a whole. The problem, however, is that we really don't know how troubling it is. As a story by Times staff writer Lucille Renwick points out, Valley high school students are spending less and less time in vocational education courses, even as fewer Valley high school graduates are going on to state colleges.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The nation's schools received an upbeat report card in math Thursday, but the bad news continued for California as its fourth-graders lagged behind their peers in 40 states and came out ahead of only those in Mississippi. California eighth-graders performed somewhat better but still ranked behind students in 32 states in the 1996 National Assessment of Educational Progress, an arm of the federal government that monitors academic achievement.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Budget constraints, scoring glitches and the difficulties inherent in such a complex new testing system have undercut the pioneering California Learning Assessment System exams, a panel reviewing the CLAS tests' first rocky year has concluded. Included in the panel's 62-page report, to be released today, was a recommendation that the state Department of Education hire an outside firm to administer the tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1995 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nearly one in every two high school students leaves the Los Angeles Unified School District before graduation day, a rate that is more than double the statewide average, according to a new report of dropout statistics released Wednesday by the state Department of Education. During the 1993-94 school year, 18,500 of the district's students in grades 9 through 12 left school without graduating or re-enrolling elsewhere. That translates to a four-year dropout rate of almost 44%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1995 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nearly one in every two high school students leaves the Los Angeles Unified School District before graduation day, a rate that is more than double the statewide average, according to a new report of dropout statistics released Wednesday by the state Department of Education. During the 1993-94 school year, 18,500 of the district's students in grades 9 through 12 left school without graduating or re-enrolling elsewhere. That translates to a four-year dropout rate of almost 44%.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Budget constraints, scoring glitches and the difficulties inherent in such a complex new testing system have undercut the pioneering California Learning Assessment System exams, a panel reviewing the CLAS tests' first rocky year has concluded. Included in the panel's 62-page report, to be released today, was a recommendation that the state Department of Education hire an outside firm to administer the tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pint-sized women's revolution is taking place in science classrooms all across Orange County. Girls are dropping "yuck" and "ick" from their science class lingo and are dissecting frogs and dismantling batteries with as much gusto as their male counterparts. "Girls don't have to be frilly and nice and clean in their science classes," said Dorothy Terman, science coordinator for the Irvine Unified School District. "In fact, we want them to get messy. Why should boys have all the fun?"
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A limited plan allowing pupils to cross district lines to attend public schools of their choice is part of the complicated budget negotiations under way between Gov. Pete Wilson and the Legislature. The proposal, developed by Assemblyman Charles W. Quackenbush (R-Saratoga) and revised by the governor's office in recent days, would allow students to transfer into districts that are willing to accept them, but only under certain conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1991 | ANITA M. CAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 14, Jackie Cervantes can already rattle off a list of friends who have dropped out of school and are struggling to survive on meager wages--that is, if they have a job at all. But Cervantes, an eighth-grader at Sierra Intermediate School, says that's not the route for her, certainly not since taking a class at school that shows students how hard it is to find a well-paying job without a high school diploma. "Dropping out is dumb.
OPINION
May 27, 2012 | By Meg Jay
It's graduation time again, and according to the National Center for Education Statistics, about 1.78 million students will walk across a stage and pick up a college diploma. Then they will face terrifying statistics about employment, pressure to make their 20s the best years of their lives, and slogans that suggest that what you do right after college may not matter anyway. What not enough graduates are hearing, however, is that - recession or not - our 20s are life's developmental sweet spot.
NEWS
March 27, 1992
The 1990 Science Report Card, prepared by the National Center for Education Statistics, is based on a national survey of nearly 20,000 students in grades 4, 8 and 12, testing their knowledge in the life, physical, earth, space and natural sciences.
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