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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1996 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Veteran jazz musician Bob Dorough sat at a table in the Silver Lake club Spaceland recently, intently poring over sheet music, trying to nail down the words and tunes to songs he was to perform in just a matter of minutes. "These kids know the songs better than I do," the 72-year-old Dorough said, nodding his ponytailed noggin in the direction of three twentysomething singers who would be joining him on stage. The thing is, Dorough wrote the songs in question.
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BUSINESS
March 18, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Rules proposed Friday by the Federal Communications Commission would require broadcasters to air at least three hours of children's educational television programs each week. The proposed rules also would limit on-air broadcasters' use of characters such as Viacom Inc.'s SpongeBob SquarePants to hawk products on the Internet during TV shows. The rules, recommended as part of a three-year transition to digital broadcasting in the U.S., don't apply to cable or satellite TV channels.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996
Everyone's letter (Aug. 7) seems to applaud the three hours of educational programs a week. In theory, it is a nice thought. Shouldn't we be encouraging children to watch less TV and read more? Shouldn't we be taking it upon ourselves to teach our children? Or would we rather just plop them down in front of the TV and programs like "Bill Nye the Science Guy"--so that they learn education has to be entertaining? And then we can criticize the broadcasters when our children do poorly in school because it's not as fun as learning from TV--instead of blaming ourselves for allowing the television to be their educator in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2003 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
The proposed sale of financially strapped KOCE-TV Channel 50, Orange County's only public television station, has attracted bids from 10 entities -- including Christian powerhouse Trinity Broadcasting Network -- setting the stage for a potentially heated debate over the future of the 30-year-old station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1996 | JOANNA M. MILLER
Educational television in Thousand Oaks is now on the air, the culmination of a 10-year cooperative effort among area public and private schools. Educational Television for the Conejo airs on Channel 59 through Ventura County and Falcon cable companies, offering a bulletin board of activities in Conejo Valley schools for the first 30 to 45 days. In addition to service in Thousand Oaks, which began Thursday, the channel will air in Westlake Village, Agoura, Newbury Park and Calabasas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1996 | JOANNA M. MILLER
Educational television began service this week in Calabasas, Agoura, Westlake Village and parts of eastern Ventura County, culminating a 10-year cooperative effort among area public and private schools. Educational Television for the Conejo is carried on Channel 59 through Ventura County and Falcon cable companies, offering a bulletin board of activities in Conejo Valley schools for the first 30 to 45 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
State schools Supt. Bill Honig issued a negative report card Thursday for Channel One, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduces commercials to the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for the time that students spend watching the program. In March, Tennessee-based Whittle Communications introduced Channel One's pilot project in five high schools and one junior high across the nation, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lewis Arnold Pike, a nutritionist and pioneer in educational television in Southern California, died May 31 of pneumonia at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in Woodland Hills. He was 82. Working alongside early broadcasters like veteran KTLA newscaster Stan Chambers, Pike began his television career in the 1950s producing instructional shows for children.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Rules proposed Friday by the Federal Communications Commission would require broadcasters to air at least three hours of children's educational television programs each week. The proposed rules also would limit on-air broadcasters' use of characters such as Viacom Inc.'s SpongeBob SquarePants to hawk products on the Internet during TV shows. The rules, recommended as part of a three-year transition to digital broadcasting in the U.S., don't apply to cable or satellite TV channels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1986
Both Ron Dorfman and Charles C. Munroe III (Letters, Dec. 17) argue that mainly because of the Catholic influence manufacturers are being denied commercial time on television, thereby keeping teenagers, homosexuals, and others in the dark about condoms, their main purpose (birth control) and their side effects (prevention of sexual diseases). Balderdash, indeed. Do these men also believe that without commercials women wouldn't konw about the feminine hygiene products available to them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lewis Arnold Pike, a nutritionist and pioneer in educational television in Southern California, died May 31 of pneumonia at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in Woodland Hills. He was 82. Working alongside early broadcasters like veteran KTLA newscaster Stan Chambers, Pike began his television career in the 1950s producing instructional shows for children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2000 | ANA CHOLO-TIPTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 50 children at Rossmoor Elementary School in Los Alamitos are logging on to the Internet, writing critiques about their favorite educational television shows once every couple of weeks and then sending them off to Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. On the receiving end is psychology professor Sandra Calvert, who can't wait to read them.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Mathematics can be as beautiful as sculpture," Jim Blinn, a pioneer of computer graphics, once told graduating students at New York's Parsons School of Design. For Blinn and others in his field, mathematics is sculpture. Chipping away at equations and shaping chunks of computer code, they create the virtual images used in everything from NASA flight simulations to Hollywood movies.
SPORTS
December 4, 1998 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a certain degree of angst when the Western football team assembled to watch videotape of its last-second loss to El Toro the night before. From accounts on both sides of the field, the Pioneers appeared to have scored the winning touchdown with 53 seconds left. But after some delay, referees waved off Jason Baughman's 27-yard pass to receiver Will Ruffin, saying that Ruffin stepped out of bounds before entering the end zone.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS, backed into a corner by the government and pushed around by competing networks, has devised a new children's programming formula: educational TV shows on a cut-rate budget. The network introduces an entirely new Saturday morning lineup today, with all six programs produced by Nelvana Limited, a Canadian company that made the network an offer it couldn't refuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
He's tall, TV-handsome and, though 57, fit and energetic enough to skate 20 miles whenever business trips take him outside his home in Manhattan. During an interview at Santa Monica's Shutters Hotel, his sharp features and thick shock of white hair turn heads. Think of a less frantic, less annoying Tom Snyder. Yet, appearance aside, broadcast journalist John Merrow is an oddity in his field. Among generalists, Merrow is an expert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996
Everyone's letter (Aug. 7) seems to applaud the three hours of educational programs a week. In theory, it is a nice thought. Shouldn't we be encouraging children to watch less TV and read more? Shouldn't we be taking it upon ourselves to teach our children? Or would we rather just plop them down in front of the TV and programs like "Bill Nye the Science Guy"--so that they learn education has to be entertaining? And then we can criticize the broadcasters when our children do poorly in school because it's not as fun as learning from TV--instead of blaming ourselves for allowing the television to be their educator in the first place.
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bowing to intense pressure from President Clinton, the nation's top television executives agreed Monday to air three hours of educational children's programming each week--a pact that children's advocates said will bring sweeping changes but critics complained had too many loopholes. Approval of the three-hour rule marked a major turnabout for the executives of the four major TV networks, who had opposed it for years on 1st Amendment grounds.
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