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OPINION
January 12, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
California's fortunes have improved so dramatically in the last two years, it was hard for even Gov. Jerry "Era of Limits" Brown to sound dour about the government's finances when he rolled out his $155-billion budget proposal last week. The tax increases that Brown persuaded voters to approve in November 2012 have not only averted the need to slash more from education and other state programs, they've helped generate a multibillion-dollar surplus. Yet Brown has stuck with the cautious practices that led the state safely to this point, proposing to pay down debt and focus new spending on education rather than trying to undo all the cuts the Legislature made during the downturn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Decades before Dos Equis introduced the most interesting man in the world via a beer commercial, that title might have belonged to a dog - a debonair, bow tie-wearing, Harvard-educated cartoon beagle named Mr. Peabody. The star of "Peabody's Improbable History," a series of six-minute animated segments that appeared alongside producer Jay Ward's "Rocky and Bullwinkle" cartoons starting in 1959, Mr. Peabody spoke eight languages, worked on government science projects and bore the moniker "The Woof of Wall Street" for his knack with stocks.
OPINION
January 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
In 1975, Nebraska Sen. Roman Hruska warned a congressional hearing that college football was in mortal danger. The threat came from Title IX, the 1972 measure that outlawed sex discrimination in educational institutions receiving federal financial assistance. To comply with the law, Hruska feared, colleges would have to equalize athletic budgets for male and female sports, and the only way to do that would be to raid the football budget. "Are we going to let Title IX kill the goose that lays the golden eggs in those colleges and universities with a major revenue-producing sport?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Democrats in the state Senate want to use an upcoming jump in education funding to make transitional kindergarten available to every 4-year-old in California. The proposed investment in early childhood education, which would total nearly $1 billion a year once the program is fully phased in by 2020, is another sign of the state's rebounding financial health. "The era of cutting education in California is over," said Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento)
OPINION
January 3, 2014 | Rahul Rekhi, Rahul Rekhi, a student at Stanford University School of Medicine, is currently studying as a Marshall Scholar at Oxford University. He served as special assistant to the Maryland secretary of health in 2013
Since its inception more than a century ago, modern medical education has undergone a series of quiet revolutions, stretching and scaling to accommodate advances in biomedical science. Yet this comprehensive expansion in one critical area masks a relative neglect of another. Despite their staggering scope -- spanning genetics to geriatrics, and everything in between -- medical curricula today largely omit training on health policy. The result? Even as today's medical students graduate with a deep scientific fluency, they leave all but illiterate when it comes to the healthcare system.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The accident that left Ryan Williams paralyzed from the neck down could have ended his promising career as a robotics researcher. Recovering at his parents' home in southwest Virginia, with limited mobility, there was no way he could return to USC full time to complete his engineering graduate studies. But from his study nearly 2,500 miles away, Williams was able to complete his course work and participate in classes as if he were right there on the USC campus. Now the 31-year-old roboticist, already internationally recognized for his research into undersea robots, is on the cusp of receiving his doctorate this spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Passing periods at Belmont High School used to mean pushing your way through a hall teeming with students. Now, it is a leisurely stroll. The storied campus perched on top of a hill on the fringe of downtown was once the largest high school in the state and one of the biggest in the country. It was also the most crowded. Built to hold 2,500 at most, it peaked at 5,500 students. But today, it could use a few more. Over the last decade, enrollment has plummeted with the construction of nearby schools by the Los Angeles Unified School District.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Chances are that if Jack Black got serious for a moment, he could sing a lulu of a version of “To Sir, With Love,” pop culture's ultimate three-minute valentine to the teaching profession. But if not for drama teacher Debbie Devine, it's far from certain that Black would have become a comic actor and musical humorist who has audiences keen to watch and listen. Devine has been a highly-regarded teacher, director and producer on the L.A. children's theater scene since the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2013 | By Howard Blume
L.A. Unified is improving faster - in some categories much faster - than most other large, urban school systems, according to the latest results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, which tests a sample of students nationwide. And while the district's overall scores remained relatively low, its progress elicited praise from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. Los Angeles is among the school systems that are "examples for the rest of the country of what can happen when schools embrace innovative reforms," Duncan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The new 3-D nature tale "Walking With Dinosaurs" is nothing like its predecessors. I don't mean the creatures of the Jurassic Period, which came before the Cretaceous Period that is the movie's staging ground. Not the "Jurassic Park" period either, when that great paleontologist Steven Spielberg introduced rampaging dinosaurs to a new generation. No, I'm referring to the late 20th century when "Walking With Dinosaurs" roamed the BBC's airwaves as an excellent TV natural history series narrated by Kenneth Branagh.
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