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Educational Reform

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig, addressing some of the San Diego city schools' best teachers, said Thursday that the second phase of the nation's educational reform movement depends on teachers, who will determine the characteristics of quality education and define the standards of their profession. Speaking to the San Diego Unified School District's 200 "mentor teachers," Honig said that "you cannot solve the more complex questions of quality from the top.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe and Howard Blume
In the middle of Watts, at one of the worst-performing high schools in Los Angeles Unified, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was in his element. As he sat with Jordan High students late last year, he shared snippets of his life story, as he's done during scores of school visits during his eight years as mayor. He was raised without a father, was kicked out of one school and dropped out of another before graduating from Roosevelt High with a 1.4 GPA - because his mother and a teacher believed in him, he told students.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1991
A failure in public education is eating away at California's future competitiveness. Efforts to improve school curricula and student achievement are threatened because of an inadequately funded system stretched to its outermost limits. But the current recession is not all that is holding back improvements: Chronic structural problems, including bureaucratic inertia, impede California's school system and threaten the state's future. Educational reform is not just about money.
WORLD
April 11, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Debate is intensifying over armed vigilante patrols that have sprung up in crime-plagued sections of rural Mexico, particularly in the state of Guerrero, where some patrols joined forces this week with a radical teachers union that has been wreaking havoc with massive protests, vandalism and violent confrontations with police. The two groups, on the surface, would appear to have little in common. The vigilante patrols, typically made up of masked campesinos , are among dozens that have emerged in the countryside in recent months, purporting to protect their communities from the depredations of the drug cartels.
OPINION
September 24, 1989 | BILL HONIG, Bill Honig is California's superintendent of public instruction
The educational reform movement is starting to produce results on a national scale. Test scores are rising, more students are taking academic courses and the dropout rate is showing slow but steady improvement. Our national leaders, particularly the President, have an opportunity to galvanize educators, increase the pace of reform and build on the progress occurring in our schools.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like an obvious educational reform less than a decade ago: If you want to make sure that kids all over the country are learning the basics, test them and test them often. But now a growing number of politicians and educators are not so sure. The reaction against standardized testing has set in. In early May, for example, James J. Florio, the new Democratic governor of New Jersey, decided to end the practice of forcing public school students to take statewide proficiency tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1995
The lights are on, but is anybody home? For more than 10 years education reformers have been warning, with increasing urgency, that American public education is in deep trouble. Everyone agrees that California public education, in particular, faces daunting challenges, especially in terms of ethnic and language diversity and the numbers of children to be educated. So there's a task force here, a reform movement there, but still no statewide, coordinated, comprehensive plan for change.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snitching some cake from a table in the teachers' lounge, 11-year-old Sasha Terentyve wriggles onto the sofa, settling himself between a physicist and an archeologist as he flips through a book on Greece. A short, sandy-haired boy with a mischievous grin, Sasha now considers the intellectuals his close friends. He's also on hugging terms with actors, astronomers and artists--all of whom double as teachers in Moscow's experimental School of Art, Culture and Freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1986
Your editorial pointed out a major problem in classroom reform. The support from the major teacher organizations has been either late or lacking. They feel that educational reform will ultimately decimate the hard-won gains in teacher salaries, classroom environment and benefits. Teachers would like to be thought of as professionals and to do this they must prove to the taxpaying public their competence and worth in the classroom. Senate Bill 1605 by Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1992
As a college student, I feel it necessary to voice my opinion. Educational reform should be a priority. I am enrolled at Cal Poly Pomona and everyday I feel the effects of budget cuts, staff reductions and lower educational standards. Trying to get through the general education requirements involves a lengthy process, including petitioning for classes, waiting in long lines, paying outrageous prices on books and materials and patience. My parents never had to go through the horrors of petitioning for classes, signing onto waiting lists or overcrowded classrooms.
WORLD
December 10, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- President Enrique Peña Nieto on Monday announced a broad reform aimed at improving Mexico's sclerotic educational system, a plan that also seems aimed at weakening the enormously powerful teachers union. Mexico has some of the worst public schools in the hemisphere, consistently placing low on international surveys of education quality. Many blame the union and its autocratic boss, Elba Esther Gordillo, who have perpetuated a system that allows teachers to buy or inherit their jobs, regardless of skill or qualifications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Gates Foundation, the country's most influential education-policy organization, has quietly ended financial support for a national group formed to push for favored reforms, including an overhaul of teacher evaluations. Communities for Teaching Excellence, headed by former L.A. school board member Yolie Flores, is planning to close its doors next month. Although based in Los Angeles, the group had a presence in Hillsborough County, Fla.; Memphis, Tenn.; and in Pittsburgh - all locations where the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has funded the development of new teacher-evaluation systems.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Pressing a contrast with his rivals for the White House, President Obama expanded his critique of the Republican budget blueprint to focus on education policy, arguing Mitt Romney would reverse his administration's policies to boost education despite the consequences to the economy. For the president, who addressed about 3,300 supporters at Capital University on the eastern edge of Ohio's capital city, the policy wasn't just about politics. It was also personal. Drawing on his and his wife's struggles to pay off student debts, Obama said at the outdoor rally that the concept of affordability was not unfamiliar.
OPINION
February 28, 2012
The first "parent trigger" petition in California, which sought to allow a charter organization to take over a Compton elementary school, ultimately failed amid bitter charges on both sides that parents had been harassed and lied to. The state Board of Education had a chance to make the process less chaotic by requiring open meetings at which both reformers and opponents would lay out their arguments, enabling parents to make an informed decision....
OPINION
September 4, 2011
On several occasions over the last few years, A.J. Duffy sat in a conference room with the editorial board of the Los Angeles Times and expounded on the evils of charter schools, the value of teachers union contracts that included pages and pages of extensive work rules, the importance of the teacher seniority system and the nefarious intentions of those who sought to streamline the firing of bad teachers. So it came as a bit of a surprise when Duffy, who recently was termed out as president of United Teachers Los Angeles, announced that he wants to open charter schools that will make it harder for teachers to receive tenure, easier for them to lose it and allow schools to move much faster to fire ineffective instructors.
OPINION
June 16, 2011 | By Antonio Villaraigosa
The crisis in Los Angeles public schools — where only about half of the students graduate from high school and fewer than 30% of those who do are college-ready — can't be solved until we make excellent teaching a top priority. Teacher quality alone can't solve the problem, but every child in every school in every neighborhood must have an effective teacher. A study released last week by the National Council on Teacher Quality calls attention to just how dramatically we are failing when it comes to recruiting, training, evaluating and compensating teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1987 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig told a bipartisan group in Orange County Thursday that he is forming a statewide lobbying organization to try to get more state money for education. Later in the day, Honig spoke to a gathering of Orange County teachers, administrators and school board trustees, who are helping to form the county's branch of the lobbying group. Honig is calling the overall organization the "California Movement for Education Reform."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Despite its proud history of educational programming, ranging from "Sesame Street" for preschoolers to college-credit telecourses for adults, the Public Broadcasting Service was admonished at its annual convention to take an even more prominent academic role by championing educational reform. Beyond the obvious societal reasons for doing so, former Proctor & Gamble chairman Owen B. Butler suggested in his keynote address, public television has a personal stake in helping to improve the nation's schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The 2,863 boxes of papers and memorabilia recently moved to Cal State Long Beach's library represent a hefty portion of late 20th century California's political history. The archives of former Gov. George Deukmejian's administration cover many key state issues, including the death penalty, education reform and the aftermath of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. In the large storage room where the cardboard boxes are shelved, framed photographs show Deukmejian with superstars of politics, entertainment and sports: Mikhail Gorbachev, Margaret Thatcher, Tommy Lasorda, Sylvester Stallone and John Travolta, among others.
OPINION
May 8, 2011
The general assumption is that when it comes to educating American kids, more is more. Longer school hours. Saturday school. Summer school. Yet more than 120 school districts across the nation are finding that less can also be more — less being fewer days spent in school. The four-day school week has been around for decades, according to the National Council of State Legislatures, but it's quietly spreading as a money-saving tactic, especially after several states — including Montana, Georgia, Missouri and Washington — passed legislation allowing school districts to make the switch as long as they lengthened each school day so that there was no reduction in instructional hours.
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