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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1994
What does it mean when (at least) seven adults have to hover around a child who bites, throws chairs and overturns desks? What does this "hovering" cost in monetary terms? Too, what does it mean when a judge has to decide who may and who may not be a cheerleader in a high school? What, I wonder, are teachers, principals and superintendents for? Are disciplinary problems and academic standards to be reserved for special committees and judges? What does it mean? Among many, many other things, it surely means that the state of education today is humiliatingly tragic.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Saying that better schools are critical for California's prosperity, GOP gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari proposes changing the way education is funded, making traditional schools more like charters and increasing online learning. "We must reject the status quo," the former U.S. Treasury official says in a 33-page policy paper set for release Tuesday. He calls for money to be sent directly to the state's 10,000 public schools rather than to their districts. He would throw out much of the state's education code, which governs the operation of schools, and effectively allow most schools to operate under the same rules as charters.
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NEWS
December 15, 1991
I was filled with profound indignation after reading the article about Helen Bernstein, president of United Teachers of Los Angeles ("Playing Tough in Hard Times," Nov. 21). In these days of financial crisis both in the public and private sectors, it does little for the professionalism of educators to hear only vindictive outbursts from union leaders. It is understandable that UTLA members would be angry when their salaries are being cut; the members of our association, AALA (Associated Administrators of Los Angeles)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
California and other states are largely failing to adequately educate most of the 70,000 youth locked up at any given time in juvenile detention facilities, according to a national report released Thursday. Most youth fail to earn any course credits or complete their high school diploma or equivalency degree while in custody, the report by the Southern Education Foundation found. Yet these young inmates are highly troubled - usually struggling with drug abuse, anger and lagging academic achievement - and urgently need effective education to help them get back on track, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1990
The education of our children is in dire straits! As a teacher at Hawthorne High School, I know the school climate is in turmoil. The educational environment grows increasingly negative each day. The situation has been created by a growing conflict between professional staff who are divided along racial lines. Specifically, the division of the staff has been manifested with racial remarks, accusations and statements that are resulting in serious damage to the educational climate in our district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1994
Anyone looking for the perfect encapsulation of what is wrong with our educational system and our society need read no further than the Column One article of Sept. 14, "What's Best for Young Geniuses?" on the Chang sisters, the preteen students taking (and excelling in, by all accounts) classes at College of the Redwoods in Eureka. At one time excellence, studiousness, self-discipline, and hard work were honored (indeed, expected) in our society. No more, obviously. I was sickened by the comments of the so-called "educators" cited in the article (starting with the college president)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997
Re "Formulas for Math Problems," Jan. 5: The ingredients of a successful program of math instruction are no mystery. Adherence to a few basic principles will go a long way toward producing the desired results. 1. Develop facility with numbers. Multiplication and division tables should be learned through drills until arithmetic manipulation becomes second nature. Calculators should not be allowed until this proficiency is achieved. 2. Do not allow making mathematics fun or easy to become a priority.
NEWS
June 15, 1987 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Appalled by the gaps in California students' knowledge of history, state education officials are considering a major overhaul of history teaching that they hope will make the subject students love to hate more comprehensible and exciting. Next month the state Board of Education is expected to approve a new history framework, a document that is revised every several years and recommends guidelines for local districts to use in developing courses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994
What a nostalgic and revealing picture of a Newport Elementary School class in 1918 ("School to Celebrate 100th Anniversary," May 3). Did modern educators notice the following: A class size of 40 pupils? Not one student with a hat on, or a cap on backward? No dark glasses? An apparently disciplined class, although a couple of the boys looked a bit cheeky (note that none of the girls gave that appearance). Current pedagogy holds that uniformity, strictness and discipline, together with a basic 3 Rs education, inhibit individuality, drive and inventiveness.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | Associated Press
A Rose Garden ceremony to honor outstanding schools ended today with a shouting match between educators and reporters trying to question President Reagan about Judge Robert H. Bork's nomination to the Supreme Court. Principals angrily rebuked several journalists who shouted questions to the President as he walked back to the Oval Office. Several journalists gave the educators a tongue-lashing in return and told them to brush up on the First Amendment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | Sandy Banks
I figured that teachers wouldn't let me off easy - even though my Saturday column took their side. I wrote about the recent classroom scuffle between a teacher and student at Santa Monica High, defending the teacher and listing the forces that make teaching so hard - including spineless administrators and unruly students. Still, many of the teachers I heard from last weekend had the same indignant response: What about the parents? If parents raised their children right, we wouldn't have problems on campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | Sandy Banks
At this point, it may not matter much to the public what actually went on in that Santa Monica High classroom where a teacher was recorded wrestling a student to the floor. The 58-second cellphone clip recorded by a student went viral this week, turning the teacher and the student into symbols of what's wrong with public schools: Defiant students. Overwhelmed teachers. Feckless administrators. Knee-jerk policies with no room for common sense. "We're in the middle of a cultural change, and this case reflects that shift," said Shawn McMullen Chen, a high school teacher for 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Bryan Mejia has some advice for the Los Angeles Board of Education. He isn't a gadfly or political consultant. He isn't running for office - he can't even vote. Mejia is a high school student. And he wants to help fix what he and other students see as the board's fundamental flaw: It is missing a voice it purports to represent. "We should have representation where the decisions affecting our education are made," the 17-year-old said. "The school board. " The board is expected to vote Tuesday on a proposal to allow a student advisory member on the board.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As Los Angeles County sheriff, Lee Baca was roundly and rightly criticized for his failure to prevent or correct the abuse of jail inmates over the course of his 15 years in office, most notably during the final few years of turmoil that culminated in the indictment of 20 deputies and Baca's resignation. It is not uncommon, when a controversial figure leaves power, for critics to denigrate every aspect of his tenure and leadership philosophy, and it would be easy to write off anything that happened at the jails on Baca's watch as being a disaster that must be reversed at the earliest possible moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The results of California's achievement tests show that most Los Angeles city school students are barely proficient in reading and writing and an even greater number have minimal math skills. The state's second California Learning Assessment System (CLAS) tests measure the ability of fourth-, eighth- and 10th-grade students to read, write and solve math problems against tough, statewide standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | Teresa Watanabe
At Wonderland Avenue Elementary School in Laurel Canyon, there are lesson plans on diverse families -- including those with two mommies or daddies -- books on homosexual authors in the library and a principal who is openly gay. But even at this school, teachers and administrators are flummoxed about how to carry out a new law requiring California public schools to teach all students -- from kindergartners to 12th-graders -- about lesbian, gay,...
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By Emily Koss
"Emily, would you please put a bowl of water on the floor so I can drink like a dog?" It was a sweet and funny request, and I was happy to do it. But it was also a reminder, once again, that I work for a 4-year-old. You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market. As a 24-year-old recent college grad, I can tell you that what you've been hearing is true. I graduated last May with unpaid internships waiting for me in Mexico, Spain and Nicaragua.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A groundbreaking, two-month trial challenging teacher job protections in California concluded Thursday with both sides asserting that the interests of students are at stake. The case, Vergara vs. California, seeks to overturn a set of laws that affect how teachers are fired, laid off and granted tenure. The Silicon Valley-based group Students Matter brought the lawsuit on behalf of nine plaintiffs, contending that the regulations hinder the removal of ineffective teachers. The result is a workforce with thousands of "grossly ineffective" teachers, which disproportionately hurts low-income and minority students, attorneys said.
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