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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1994
What does it mean when (at least) seven adults have to hover around a child who bites, throws chairs and overturns desks? What does this "hovering" cost in monetary terms? Too, what does it mean when a judge has to decide who may and who may not be a cheerleader in a high school? What, I wonder, are teachers, principals and superintendents for? Are disciplinary problems and academic standards to be reserved for special committees and judges? What does it mean? Among many, many other things, it surely means that the state of education today is humiliatingly tragic.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Bryan Mejia has some advice for the Los Angeles Board of Education. He isn't a gadfly or political consultant. He isn't running for office - he can't even vote. Mejia is a high school student. And he wants to help fix what he and other students see as the board's fundamental flaw: It is missing a voice it purports to represent. "We should have representation where the decisions affecting our education are made," the 17-year-old said. "The school board. " The board is expected to vote Tuesday on a proposal to allow a student advisory member on the board.
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NEWS
December 15, 1991
I was filled with profound indignation after reading the article about Helen Bernstein, president of United Teachers of Los Angeles ("Playing Tough in Hard Times," Nov. 21). In these days of financial crisis both in the public and private sectors, it does little for the professionalism of educators to hear only vindictive outbursts from union leaders. It is understandable that UTLA members would be angry when their salaries are being cut; the members of our association, AALA (Associated Administrators of Los Angeles)
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1990
The education of our children is in dire straits! As a teacher at Hawthorne High School, I know the school climate is in turmoil. The educational environment grows increasingly negative each day. The situation has been created by a growing conflict between professional staff who are divided along racial lines. Specifically, the division of the staff has been manifested with racial remarks, accusations and statements that are resulting in serious damage to the educational climate in our district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1994
Anyone looking for the perfect encapsulation of what is wrong with our educational system and our society need read no further than the Column One article of Sept. 14, "What's Best for Young Geniuses?" on the Chang sisters, the preteen students taking (and excelling in, by all accounts) classes at College of the Redwoods in Eureka. At one time excellence, studiousness, self-discipline, and hard work were honored (indeed, expected) in our society. No more, obviously. I was sickened by the comments of the so-called "educators" cited in the article (starting with the college president)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997
Re "Formulas for Math Problems," Jan. 5: The ingredients of a successful program of math instruction are no mystery. Adherence to a few basic principles will go a long way toward producing the desired results. 1. Develop facility with numbers. Multiplication and division tables should be learned through drills until arithmetic manipulation becomes second nature. Calculators should not be allowed until this proficiency is achieved. 2. Do not allow making mathematics fun or easy to become a priority.
NEWS
June 15, 1987 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Appalled by the gaps in California students' knowledge of history, state education officials are considering a major overhaul of history teaching that they hope will make the subject students love to hate more comprehensible and exciting. Next month the state Board of Education is expected to approve a new history framework, a document that is revised every several years and recommends guidelines for local districts to use in developing courses.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2009 | Washington Post
If you have ever rolled your eyes when your child says a teacher's grade was unfair, you might want to think again. Your child might be right. Douglas Reeves, an expert on grading systems, conducted an experiment with more than 10,000 educators that he says proves just how subjective grades can be. Reeves asked teachers and administrators in the United States, Australia, Canada and South America to determine a final semester grade for...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994
What a nostalgic and revealing picture of a Newport Elementary School class in 1918 ("School to Celebrate 100th Anniversary," May 3). Did modern educators notice the following: A class size of 40 pupils? Not one student with a hat on, or a cap on backward? No dark glasses? An apparently disciplined class, although a couple of the boys looked a bit cheeky (note that none of the girls gave that appearance). Current pedagogy holds that uniformity, strictness and discipline, together with a basic 3 Rs education, inhibit individuality, drive and inventiveness.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By Emily Koss
"Emily, would you please put a bowl of water on the floor so I can drink like a dog?" It was a sweet and funny request, and I was happy to do it. But it was also a reminder, once again, that I work for a 4-year-old. You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market. As a 24-year-old recent college grad, I can tell you that what you've been hearing is true. I graduated last May with unpaid internships waiting for me in Mexico, Spain and Nicaragua.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As Los Angeles County sheriff, Lee Baca was roundly and rightly criticized for his failure to prevent or correct the abuse of jail inmates over the course of his 15 years in office, most notably during the final few years of turmoil that culminated in the indictment of 20 deputies and Baca's resignation. It is not uncommon, when a controversial figure leaves power, for critics to denigrate every aspect of his tenure and leadership philosophy, and it would be easy to write off anything that happened at the jails on Baca's watch as being a disaster that must be reversed at the earliest possible moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A groundbreaking, two-month trial challenging teacher job protections in California concluded Thursday with both sides asserting that the interests of students are at stake. The case, Vergara vs. California, seeks to overturn a set of laws that affect how teachers are fired, laid off and granted tenure. The Silicon Valley-based group Students Matter brought the lawsuit on behalf of nine plaintiffs, contending that the regulations hinder the removal of ineffective teachers. The result is a workforce with thousands of "grossly ineffective" teachers, which disproportionately hurts low-income and minority students, attorneys said.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Working as a Jack in the Box cashier, Marissa Cruz Santos breathed a sigh of relief last year when she qualified for an Obama administration program that defers deportation of young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children. With high expectations and a freshly minted work permit, Santos, 27, hit the job market, hoping to leverage her new status and a Cal State Fullerton degree into an entry-level office position. But after applying for several jobs near her Riverside home, Santos got only two interviews and no offers.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Two-fifths of the nation's public school districts offer no preschool programs, and most of those that do offer only part-day programs. Black students account for less than a fifth of those in preschool across the nation but make up almost half of the students who are suspended from preschool multiple times. Those results from the first comprehensive survey in nearly 15 years of civil rights data from the 97,000 U.S. public schools show they remain marked by inequities.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | Associated Press
A Rose Garden ceremony to honor outstanding schools ended today with a shouting match between educators and reporters trying to question President Reagan about Judge Robert H. Bork's nomination to the Supreme Court. Principals angrily rebuked several journalists who shouted questions to the President as he walked back to the Oval Office. Several journalists gave the educators a tongue-lashing in return and told them to brush up on the First Amendment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The results of California's achievement tests show that most Los Angeles city school students are barely proficient in reading and writing and an even greater number have minimal math skills. The state's second California Learning Assessment System (CLAS) tests measure the ability of fourth-, eighth- and 10th-grade students to read, write and solve math problems against tough, statewide standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
Tucked in the corner of a grimy East Hollywood strip mall is a shining hope of public education. Or so U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Wednesday in an event that showcased a comprehensive program to boost academic achievement by supporting students and their families with job training, health services, after-school tutoring and other help. The program is a collaboration of Los Angeles public and private partners led by the Youth Policy Institute, which received a $30-million federal grant in 2012 to launch the initiative in the high-poverty neighborhoods of East Hollywood and Pacoima.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Howard Blume
The mayor's top education advisor, Thelma Melendez de Santa Ana, is joining the Los Angeles Unified School District as a senior administrator. The 55-year-old Melendez, a former Obama administration official, was talked about in recent times as a contender for the top job at the nation's second-largest school system. At L.A. Unified, Melendez will serve as second-in-command for Beyond the Bell, a division that oversees after-school programs, among other functions. She's likely to take over that department after the anticipated retirement of the current head, L.A. schools Supt.
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