Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEduction
IN THE NEWS

Eduction

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 6, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Any parents who expect their children to go to college one day have probably thought--or worried--about how they were going to finance that education. Some financial experts maintain that four years at a private college will cost upward of $200,000 by the time today's toddlers are ready to enroll. That would require parents--assuming an 8% annual return on their money--to set aside $500 per month per child for the next 16 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 6, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Any parents who expect their children to go to college one day have probably thought--or worried--about how they were going to finance that education. Some financial experts maintain that four years at a private college will cost upward of $200,000 by the time today's toddlers are ready to enroll. That would require parents--assuming an 8% annual return on their money--to set aside $500 per month per child for the next 16 years.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000 | Andre Briscoe, (714) 966-5848
Tamara Thomsen, a special eduction teacher at Glen H. Dysinger Sr. Elementary School, has been named the Centralia School District's 2000 Teacher of the Year, and the district's nominee for the 2001 Orange County Teacher of the Year ceremony. Thomsen holds a bachelor's degree in special education from Ball State University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA and DEBRA CANO and JOHN POPE
Columbus Tustin Middle School has received a special designation and a $25,000 grant from the state Department of Eduction for improvements in the area of science. The department has classified the campus as a science demonstration school. The grant, officials said, will be used for staff development and to buy materials such as video equipment, computer software, Internet resources and laboratory equipment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
The Tustin Unified School District has made a few administrative changes for the upcoming school year. Elizabeth Connelly and Amy Shaw have been named the new high school deans at Foothill and Tustin high schools, respectively. Connelly has worked in public eduction for 10 years, serving numerous positions in the Long Beach Unified School District. Shaw began her education career in 1995 as an English teacher at La Mirada High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1998
High school textbooks that the school district plans to use during the 1998-99 year are on display at district offices this week. "This is a great opportunity for parents and the community to see what books we plan to use at the high school next year," said Supt. Laura Plasse. Parents will have a chance to comment on the selection at the Board of Eduction's June 16 meeting, officials said. The textbooks may be reviewed June 1-5 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994
Marcia Milchiker, president of the Saddleback Community College District Board of Trustees, has been reelected to a fourth term as a director of the Orange County School Boards Assn. Elected by about 180 school board trustees and 35 superintendents throughout the county, Milchiker will hold the office for another year. The association is the local branch of the California School Boards Assn.
SPORTS
February 4, 1989
In defense of John Thompson, I find it upsetting that Jim Murray failed to point out that while at Georgetown, Thompson has graduated close to 90% of his athletes. The academic program that Thompson has helped to establish is recognized as one of the best and most successful in the country. Why should the NCAA have the power to tell Thompson or any other coach whom they can allow into their program? If Thompson feels that he can take a student-athlete into his program and give them a quality education, or at least the opportunity to get an eduction, why should the NCAA be allowed to say no?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1990
How many languages does he suggest we teach in? Offhand, we have large populations of Latinos (of several countries), Vietnamese, Chinese, Armenians, Russians, etc. Where do we get the money for these bilingual programs since we are already in a severe budgetary crisis? Finally, how did the masses who immigrated here at the turn of the century get by? At that time we had many Polish, German, Yiddish, Italian-speaking people come to our shores. They managed to learn English and prosper without special programs.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2001 | Lee Romney
Los Angeles community development guru Denise G. Fairchild is in Tennessee today doing something she hadn't dreamed of a week ago: team teaching with former Vice President Al Gore. Gore recently announced his plans to develop a curriculum in "family-centered community building" with help from UCLA faculty. Fairchild, founder and president of the Los Angeles-based Community Development Technologies Center, has a long career in the field and also teaches at UCLA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1994
I read with interest your interview with Education Secretary Richard Riley regarding challenges faced by our nation's public education system (Opinion, Feb. 13). While Riley's assessment of the problems in today's public eduction system is generally accurate, he neglects to mention another factor which heavily contributes to the problems of California's public eduction system: our state's spending priorities. Under the proposed California budget for 1994-95, the state would allot $4,217 per K-12 student, which is the same amount the state is spending this current school year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|