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Edward Abbey

BOOKS
June 11, 1989 | Mort Kamins, Kamins is a free-lance writer. and
Disparate essays, written for various publications under differing circumstances, when flung together tend to vary wildly in quality. Certainly that's the case with this book. In his concluding section, sardonically named "Living Off the Fat of the Land," Page Stegner finds a raffish picaresque tone, immensely likable and jaunty, reminiscent of Steinbeck in "Cannery Row." He recounts in hilarious, self-effacing detail his attempts--with the help and hindrance of some friends--first, to buy and raise a cow for inexpensive beef; next, to hunt "wild boar," which turn out to be a neighbor's domestic pigs; and finally, to buy and operate a small fishing boat.
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BOOKS
January 28, 1996 | John Balzar, Times national correspondent John Balzar was The Times Nairobi bureau chief during 1995
From my house in Kenya it was 15 miles to a hillock where I saw a pride of six lions last year, four of them full-maned males. Lions are king, as they say. But as an American reared in the American West, the point I would like to make is that lions, grand as they are, are not king of my imagination and never will be. What evokes wonders of the wild like no other creature is the bear, noble and mystical. Whether teddy bear or grizzly bear, they console us if our crowded world seems to be falling apart.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Edward Abbey died on March 14 at age 62. That evening, friends hauled the author of "The Monkeywrench Gang" into the desert and buried him under a big pile of black rocks, somewhere out in the middle of nowhere. Over the weekend, some of those same friends, accompanied by hundreds of others, walked into another part of that vast slick rock and cacti cemetery to celebrate the life of a man, who, more quickly than any writer since Jack Kerouac, has been resurrected as a modern myth.
BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | Bill McKibben, "The End of Nature," McKibben's book on the greenhouse effect, will be published by Random House in the fall. and
John Burroughs was an odd sort of nature writer. Disdaining exploration and adventure, he stayed put in the gentle Catskill mountains of his birth. He would venture forth occasionally--Teddy Roosevelt asked him along on his presidential visits to the western parks--but he was invariably unimpressed. Yellowstone's geysers struck him as "out of place, as if nature had made a mistake," he suggested that their power be harnessed to heat the nearby hotels. When he visited Yosemite, he sulked till he spotted a robin, "the first I had seen since leaving home."
BOOKS
June 25, 1989 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor
Read your way into the Massachusetts woods with John Jerome; out come echoes of Walden Pond and Tinker Creek and all those outdoor kindred spirits from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Edward Abbey or Edward Hoagland. This is that fertile soil where, in Emersonian terms, the civilized creature leaves urbanity, dives into nature, thrashes among fallen leaves and finally unpacks the bags only to discover that the luggage of the other life is still important. Leaves, weather and landfall matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1989
It was with great sadness that I learned of the death of author Edward Abbey. I will not be able to think of the arid beauty of northern Arizona or Utah's Canyonlands without his writings coming to mind. I hope that his publishers will release the draft of his last novel. A sequel to "The Monkey Wrench Gang" will be welcomed with open arms. Thank you, Mr.
BOOKS
January 14, 1990 | Charles Bowden
" . . . the damn thing is alive. When you finish, the tale lives on in your head, which is the most a book can do."
NEWS
September 27, 2005
It was a true pleasure in this concrete mess to open the paper and read Ken Lamberton's essay on Edward Abbey ["His Preferred Immortality," Sept. 20], one of our greatest outdoor writers and activists. STEVE TYLER Orange
NEWS
January 19, 2000
This Sunday: John Reader on "African Ceremonies"; Sherman Alexie on Ian Frazier's "On the Rez"; Jonathan Levi on Robert Olen Butler's "Mr. Spaceman"; and Douglas Brinkley with an appreciation of Edward Abbey on the 25th anniversary of the publication of "The Monkey Wrench Gang."
TRAVEL
June 10, 2012 | By David Kelly, Special to the Los Angeles Times
HORSESHOE CANYON, Utah - In a remote arm of Canyonlands National Park, deep inside a warren of rock and sand, is one of the greatest and most mysterious collections of ancient art in North America. Towering, enigmatic pictographs, some more than 6,000 years old, stare down from stone walls, their meaning unknown yet their allure universal. This is Horseshoe Canyon, one of the loneliest places you're likely to find in this country, nestled amid southeast Utah's labyrinth of slickrock, arches and desert.
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