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Edward B Lewis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writers
Edward B. Lewis, the Caltech Nobel laureate who was the first to explain how genes control the development of organs during the early growth of an embryo, died Wednesday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena after a long battle with cancer. He was 86. Lewis' studies explained how an essentially shapeless fertilized egg develops into an organism with a front and back, head and feet, and right and left sides.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2004
A memorial service for Caltech biologist and Nobel Prize-winner Edward B. Lewis will be held at 2 p.m. Oct. 25 in Beckman Auditorium on the Caltech campus in Pasadena. Lewis, who won a Nobel in 1995 for his work on how genes regulate the development of specific regions, died July 21 of cancer at the age of 86.
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NEWS
November 18, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush has awarded the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology to 30 scientists, engineers and mathematicians, including two Caltech professors. "More and more, our nation depends on basic, scientific research to spur economic growth, longer and healthier lives, a more secure world and indeed a safer environment," Bush said at a recent presentation ceremony in the East Room of the White House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writers
Edward B. Lewis, the Caltech Nobel laureate who was the first to explain how genes control the development of organs during the early growth of an embryo, died Wednesday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena after a long battle with cancer. He was 86. Lewis' studies explained how an essentially shapeless fertilized egg develops into an organism with a front and back, head and feet, and right and left sides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The million-dollar prize, much like a lottery jackpot, started with a $1 investment. Edward B. Lewis and his buddy Eddie Novitski were sophomores at Meyers High School in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., in 1933 when they saw an ad in the back of Science magazine offering 100 fruit flies for $1. Intrigued by "the idea of using an animal and learning something valuable," Lewis said, they used the entire Meyers Biology Club treasury of $4 and sent off to Purdue University for their breeding stock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2004
A memorial service for Caltech biologist and Nobel Prize-winner Edward B. Lewis will be held at 2 p.m. Oct. 25 in Beckman Auditorium on the Caltech campus in Pasadena. Lewis, who won a Nobel in 1995 for his work on how genes regulate the development of specific regions, died July 21 of cancer at the age of 86.
NEWS
June 7, 1990
Three Caltech faculty members have been elected to the American Philosophical Society. They are Don L. Anderson, the Eleanor and John R. McMillan Professor of Geophysics and former director of the Seismology Laboratory; Edward B. Lewis, the Thomas Hunt Morgan Professor of Biology, emeritus, and Rudolph A. Marcus, the Arthur Amos Noyes Professor of Chemistry. The organization, the country's first learned society, grew from Benjamin Franklin's 1743 proposal to establish a scientific society.
NEWS
October 29, 1987
Edward B. Lewis, professor of biology at Caltech, has received a $20,000 Gairdner Foundation International Award for his pioneering research on how genes direct an embryo's growth. Lewis and Walter J. Gehring of the University of Basel, Switzerland, who shared the award, were honored last week at a Gairdner Foundation program at the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada.
MAGAZINE
February 7, 1999 | Margaret Chapman
Caltech: Robert A. Millikan, Physics, 1923; Thomas Hunt Morgan, Medicine, 1933; Carl D. Anderson, Physics, 1936; Linus Pauling, Chemistry, 1954, and Peace, 1962; George W. Beadle, Medicine, 1958; Rudolf Mossbauer, Physics, 1961; Richard Feynman, Physics, 1965; Murray Gell-Mann, Physics, 1969; Max Delbruck, Medicine, 1969; Renato Dulbecco, Medicine, 1975; Roger W. Sperry, Medicine, 1981; William A. Fowler, Physics, 1983; Rudolph A. Marcus, Chemistry, 1992; Edward B. Lewis, Medicine, 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two California scientists were named last week as winners of the 1991 Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards. The prestigious awards, which carry a stipend of $15,000, are frequently viewed as precursors of Nobel prizes. During the 45-year history of the awards, 49 recipients have subsequently received Nobels. Caltech geneticist Edward B. Lewis shared one award with geneticist Christiane Nusslein-Volhard of Germany for their research into the genetics of fruit flies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The million-dollar prize, much like a lottery jackpot, started with a $1 investment. Edward B. Lewis and his buddy Eddie Novitski were sophomores at Meyers High School in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., in 1933 when they saw an ad in the back of Science magazine offering 100 fruit flies for $1. Intrigued by "the idea of using an animal and learning something valuable," Lewis said, they used the entire Meyers Biology Club treasury of $4 and sent off to Purdue University for their breeding stock.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush has awarded the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology to 30 scientists, engineers and mathematicians, including two Caltech professors. "More and more, our nation depends on basic, scientific research to spur economic growth, longer and healthier lives, a more secure world and indeed a safer environment," Bush said at a recent presentation ceremony in the East Room of the White House.
NEWS
September 29, 1991
Caltech biologist Edward B. Lewis, one of a handful of genetic researchers popularly known as the "Lords of the Flies" because they have used the common fruit fly to probe the secrets of genetic development, has been awarded the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award. The Pennsylvania-born Lewis, 73, is Caltech's Thomas Hunt Morgan professor of biology. He has been a member of the school's faculty since 1946.
NEWS
February 7, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
When Harvard asked Judith Richards Hope to recommend 15 women to serve on its governing board, she did not include her own name. But, as far as Harvard is concerned, she's at the top of the list. The Board of Overseers of the Cambridge, Mass., school unanimously appointed Hope to be the first woman on the seven-member Harvard Corporation in its 352-year history.
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