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Edward Bass

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
EDWARD BASS has a resume that would make any novice movie producer envious: four films in two years, with his latest, "Bobby," garnering early award season buzz with its all-star cast that includes Oscar winners Anthony Hopkins and Helen Hunt, along with Sharon Stone, Demi Moore and Martin Sheen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos
Producer Edward Bass said Tuesday he has no plans to remove his name from the credits of director Emilio Estevez's period drama "Bobby" after a story in The Times detailed how Bass kept quiet about his controversial past to people who had worked on the film. The story revealed that Bass, then using his first name Michael, had served time in prison in the mid-1980s for mail fraud before emerging as one of Hollywood's most controversial promoters of celebrity-driven events.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos
Producer Edward Bass said Tuesday he has no plans to remove his name from the credits of director Emilio Estevez's period drama "Bobby" after a story in The Times detailed how Bass kept quiet about his controversial past to people who had worked on the film. The story revealed that Bass, then using his first name Michael, had served time in prison in the mid-1980s for mail fraud before emerging as one of Hollywood's most controversial promoters of celebrity-driven events.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
EDWARD BASS has a resume that would make any novice movie producer envious: four films in two years, with his latest, "Bobby," garnering early award season buzz with its all-star cast that includes Oscar winners Anthony Hopkins and Helen Hunt, along with Sharon Stone, Demi Moore and Martin Sheen.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury in Florence, Ariz., awarded nearly $520,000 in lost wages to two former crew members who broke open Biosphere 2 and sued the project's operators for breach of contract after they were fired. Abigail Alling and Mark Van Thillo received the back pay they claimed following their arrest for breaking seals and opening doors to the glass-and-steel domed complex on April 4, 1994.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ADAM S. BAUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This is a story of people who made a world in their image and of how it came apart. Their world is a self-contained planet in a bottle outside Tucson called Biosphere 2--an ambitious ecology experiment that draws 250,000 tourists every year to browse past its souvenir stands, admire its architecture and gawk at its sculptures constructed of scrap metal recycled from nuclear weapons laboratories.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1993 | From Associated Press
This year's richest individual: A Japanese hotel and railroad baron worth at least $9 billion. Yoskiaki Tsutsumi, 59, ranks first in Forbes magazine's annual listing of the world's billionaires. The Walton family of Wal-Mart stores was the world's richest family, worth $25.3 billion, Forbes said in its July 5 edition. Tsutsumi, with interest in hotels, railroads and the Seibu Lions baseball team, is worth $9 billion through his 40% stake in the holding company Kokudo, the magazine said.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | United Press International
Yale University received its largest gift in more than two decades Monday, a $20-million donation from the heirs of a Texas oil baron to establish a school to study, research and preserve the environment. The gift to establish the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies was the first in a series to be made by the Bass family of Ft. Worth, said Yale President Benno C. Schmidt Jr. The gift to establish the biospheric studies institute was presented to Schmidt by Edward P.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | Associated Press
Two people who lived inside Biosphere 2 for two years were arrested Wednesday for allegedly breaking into the sealed environmental experiment and leaving the doors open so outside air could get in. Abigail Alling, who has been taking responsibility for Monday's intrusion in calls to reporters across the country, was arrested at a Tucson motel with fellow crew member Mark Van Thillo. They each face felony charges of burglary and criminal property damage.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | From Associated Press
Seal a group of scientists inside Biosphere 2, the futuristic glass-and-dome experiment, for two years and what do you get? Fights over food. Botanist Linda Leigh said personality differences and crop failures made life difficult for the eight crew members who were encased in the 3-acre mini-world from 1991 to 1993. "Food distribution became a very tense issue," Leigh said. "I think that made us all a little cranky, always being hungry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994 | Associated Press
Biosphere 2 embarks today on what its operators hope will be the start of 98 years of continuous habitation in the domed ecological laboratory and the recovery of its image as serious science. Nearly six months after the first eight-member crew ended a two-year stay inside the lab, the project has been redesigned. Now, a crew of five men and two women will rotate in and out of the three-acre glass-and-steel bubble and its 10 apartments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Dvorak's Stabat Mater is an unjustly neglected masterpiece that may be coming into its own. A new Naxos CD by the Washington Chorus and Orchestra led by Robert Shafer joins the slim ranks of previous recordings by Czech music specialists such as Vaclav Talich and Rafael Kubelik. John Alexander, music director of the Pacific Chorale, made the work the major part of a chorale concert Sunday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center and, as on the Naxos disc, paired it with Dvorak's Psalm 149.
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