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Edward Behr

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edward Behr, 81, a noted British foreign correspondent and writer who penned books on history, good eating and his career as a journalist, died May 26 in Paris, his family said. Behr covered conflicts across the globe -- from the FrenchAlgerian conflict to the Vietnam War -- for publications that included Newsweek during a long career as a foreign correspondent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edward Behr, 81, a noted British foreign correspondent and writer who penned books on history, good eating and his career as a journalist, died May 26 in Paris, his family said. Behr covered conflicts across the globe -- from the FrenchAlgerian conflict to the Vietnam War -- for publications that included Newsweek during a long career as a foreign correspondent.
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BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Eugen Weber, Weber, whose latest book is "My France," has also written on Romania.
On Dec. 21, 1989, Nicolae Ceausescu, absolute ruler of Romania for nearly a quarter of a century, fled the jeers and catcalls of an angry crowd in the center of Bucharest. On Dec. 25, he and his wife Elena, a nagging, malign shrew, were tried by a kangaroo court representing the newly formed National Salvation Front, and executed with a hail of bullets. Photographs of their bloody corpses were promptly flashed around Romania and the world. The Antichrist had died on Christmas Day. The two books under review--one by Newsweek correspondent Edward Behr, the other by Andrei Codrescu, poet, professor and commentator on National Public Radio--complement each other.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the title implicitly suggests, Maurice Chevalier's biographer regards his debonair subject not only as a consummate theatrical figure, but as a metaphor for the beguiling and often quixotic French personality. Born in 1888, Chevalier was 84 when he died, mourned "almost on the scale of de Gaulle or Jean-Paul Sartre" by a grieving nation. Maurice Chevalier had come to epitomize France not only to his countrymen but to the world.
BOOKS
September 29, 1991
I am currently working on a biography of the great French entertainer Maurice Chevalier. Could anyone who knew him in his Hollywood stays, both before the second World War (1929-1934) and after the war, kindly get in touch with Edward Behr, 86 rue de Monceau, Paris 75008, France. (Telephone 331-4522 6488; FAX 331-4522-2740.) EDWARD BEHR, PARIS
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
A newsreel from the spring of 1946: "Twenty-eight Japanese war criminals, including former Premier Hideki Tojo, go on trial in Tokyo to answer for the aggressive cruelty which they sponsored. The trial is comparable to that of the Nazi warlords in Nuremberg, and the prisoners are charged with crimes against humanity and peace, and finally with just plain murder." Narrator: " The biggest absentee, of course, was Hirohito himself. . . ."
BOOKS
January 21, 1990 | Jonathan Kirsch
" . . . I came away from 'Hirohito' with the sense that a curtain had been drawn aside, and an inner chamber of history had been revealed to our gaze."
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the title implicitly suggests, Maurice Chevalier's biographer regards his debonair subject not only as a consummate theatrical figure, but as a metaphor for the beguiling and often quixotic French personality. Born in 1888, Chevalier was 84 when he died, mourned "almost on the scale of de Gaulle or Jean-Paul Sartre" by a grieving nation. Maurice Chevalier had come to epitomize France not only to his countrymen but to the world.
BOOKS
February 2, 1992 | KAREN STABINER
THE ARTFUL EATER by Edward Behr (Atlantic Monthly Press: 288 pp.; $19.95). Behr leads the life too many of us dream of: The Bennington College drop-out traded carpentry for a newsletter, called "The Art of Eating," in 1986. Though he got only 32 subscribers from his first mailing, he had savings and a supportive family to see him through (always nice when attempting a radical career change).
BOOKS
September 29, 1991
I am currently working on a biography of the great French entertainer Maurice Chevalier. Could anyone who knew him in his Hollywood stays, both before the second World War (1929-1934) and after the war, kindly get in touch with Edward Behr, 86 rue de Monceau, Paris 75008, France. (Telephone 331-4522 6488; FAX 331-4522-2740.) EDWARD BEHR, PARIS
BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Eugen Weber, Weber, whose latest book is "My France," has also written on Romania.
On Dec. 21, 1989, Nicolae Ceausescu, absolute ruler of Romania for nearly a quarter of a century, fled the jeers and catcalls of an angry crowd in the center of Bucharest. On Dec. 25, he and his wife Elena, a nagging, malign shrew, were tried by a kangaroo court representing the newly formed National Salvation Front, and executed with a hail of bullets. Photographs of their bloody corpses were promptly flashed around Romania and the world. The Antichrist had died on Christmas Day. The two books under review--one by Newsweek correspondent Edward Behr, the other by Andrei Codrescu, poet, professor and commentator on National Public Radio--complement each other.
BOOKS
January 21, 1990 | Jonathan Kirsch
" . . . I came away from 'Hirohito' with the sense that a curtain had been drawn aside, and an inner chamber of history had been revealed to our gaze."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
A newsreel from the spring of 1946: "Twenty-eight Japanese war criminals, including former Premier Hideki Tojo, go on trial in Tokyo to answer for the aggressive cruelty which they sponsored. The trial is comparable to that of the Nazi warlords in Nuremberg, and the prisoners are charged with crimes against humanity and peace, and finally with just plain murder." Narrator: " The biggest absentee, of course, was Hirohito himself. . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Japanese scholars, upset over a coming PBS docudrama that holds Japanese Emperor Hirohito fully responsible for the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, are attempting to block its airing. Barry Chase, PBS' vice president for news and public affirs programs, is upset too. He maintains the 57-minute "Hirohito: Behind the Myth" "does not charge Hirohito with having been responsible, fully or otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
For some episodes in history--such as Nicolae Ceausescu's spectacularly disastrous totalitarian hold on Romania from the mid-'60s to 1989--no explanation is sufficient. Certainly, author-journalist Edward Behr doggedly sifts through the evidence and eyewitness accounts of this rule by terror in his BBC-produced "The Rise and Fall of Ceausescu" (tonight at 9 on KPBS Channel 15, at 11 p.m. on KCET Channel 28).
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