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Edward Burns

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Elaine Dutka
First-time director Edward Burns, 27, was thrust into the spotlight when "The Brothers McMullen," the New York-based comedy he wrote, co-produced and starred in, took the top prize at the 1995 Sundance Film Festival. Filmed on weekends for $25,000, the character-driven movie showcased Burns' storytelling instincts and keen ear for dialogue. Picked up by 20th Century Fox's Searchlight division, the film went on to gross more than $10 million. This summer, Searchlight will release his next movie, a $3.5-million romantic comedy called "She's the One," that he also directed, wrote, produced and starred in. Burns' third project, "Krackers," will get underway in the fall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2007 | David Sarno, Times Staff Writer
It's not clear whether "Purple Violets," the new living-and-loving-in-New York film from writer-director Edward Burns, would be a good first-date movie. As the first full-length feature to premiere exclusively on Apple's iTunes store -- not in theaters -- your date would have to be cool with coming over to watch the movie on your laptop. Or desktop. Or even on the gorgeous little 3-inch by 2-inch screen of your iPod Touch -- since nothing says romance like sharing ear buds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2007 | David Sarno, Times Staff Writer
It's not clear whether "Purple Violets," the new living-and-loving-in-New York film from writer-director Edward Burns, would be a good first-date movie. As the first full-length feature to premiere exclusively on Apple's iTunes store -- not in theaters -- your date would have to be cool with coming over to watch the movie on your laptop. Or desktop. Or even on the gorgeous little 3-inch by 2-inch screen of your iPod Touch -- since nothing says romance like sharing ear buds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | Gene Seymour, Newsday
The best parts of any Edward Burns movie come when his characters, especially the guys, just kick back and yap away. They could be spinning yarns, as they frequently do in Burns' latest, "The Groomsmen," about childhood slights, real and imagined. They could be doing a can-you-top-this jam session of mutually accepted invective. However you label such blarney, talking junk gives Burns' movies a cozy, lived-in texture.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
This 1995 film was written, directed by and starred 26-year-old Edward Burns (pictured) on less than a $25,000 budget. The vagaries of the heart is what "Brothers" is about, as well as the related questions of commitment, fidelity and the demands and benefits of family. Burns' native wit keeps things loose and natural, as does the pleasure at being exposed to an unexplored setting for romance. Maxine Bahns (pictured) also stars (HBO early Saturday at 5:05 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
When self-confident, charismatic Charlie gets off the bus in an unnamed burg and kick-starts the plot of "No Looking Back," it's momentarily reminiscent of the film version of William Inge's "Picnic," where a handsome stranger blows into town and causes all kinds of romantic complications. Except Charlie turns out to be no stranger and neither is Edward Burns, who plays him and wrote and directed this film, his third.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
You can only be young, unknown and suddenly hot once in a lifetime, and that moment came for Edward Burns when his refreshing "The Brothers McMullen" won the Grand Jury Prize at the 1995 Sundance Film Festival. Written, directed by and starring Burns, "McMullen" went on to deserved popularity, with a cost-to-profits ratio that Variety called the year's best. So when it came to his second film, Burns not surprisingly ended up reshuffling the same ingredients one more time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2001 | JOHN ANDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy to see why Edward Burns' "Sidewalks of New York" was postponed from its September opening date. In one of the first scenes, you can see the late World Trade Center, looming majestically, directly over Burns' right shoulder. Which wouldn't be so bad. But it's giving the better performance. "Sidewalks," far less whimsical than its title suggests, co-opts everything in its technique and tone--and nothing in its laugh quotient--from Woody Allen. A more backhanded homage is hard to imagine.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | Gene Seymour, Newsday
The best parts of any Edward Burns movie come when his characters, especially the guys, just kick back and yap away. They could be spinning yarns, as they frequently do in Burns' latest, "The Groomsmen," about childhood slights, real and imagined. They could be doing a can-you-top-this jam session of mutually accepted invective. However you label such blarney, talking junk gives Burns' movies a cozy, lived-in texture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Edward Burns' 1995 directorial debut, "The Brothers McMullen," will be remembered as the little indie film that could. Written while Burns was holding down a full-time job as a production assistant at "Entertainment Tonight," shot largely in his parents' house, and starring Burns and his then-girlfriend Maxine Bahns, the film was made for $25,000 (final overall cost was $118,000) and took in more than $10 million at the box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2001 | JOHN ANDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy to see why Edward Burns' "Sidewalks of New York" was postponed from its September opening date. In one of the first scenes, you can see the late World Trade Center, looming majestically, directly over Burns' right shoulder. Which wouldn't be so bad. But it's giving the better performance. "Sidewalks," far less whimsical than its title suggests, co-opts everything in its technique and tone--and nothing in its laugh quotient--from Woody Allen. A more backhanded homage is hard to imagine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Edward Burns' 1995 directorial debut, "The Brothers McMullen," will be remembered as the little indie film that could. Written while Burns was holding down a full-time job as a production assistant at "Entertainment Tonight," shot largely in his parents' house, and starring Burns and his then-girlfriend Maxine Bahns, the film was made for $25,000 (final overall cost was $118,000) and took in more than $10 million at the box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
When self-confident, charismatic Charlie gets off the bus in an unnamed burg and kick-starts the plot of "No Looking Back," it's momentarily reminiscent of the film version of William Inge's "Picnic," where a handsome stranger blows into town and causes all kinds of romantic complications. Except Charlie turns out to be no stranger and neither is Edward Burns, who plays him and wrote and directed this film, his third.
BOOKS
November 16, 1997 | LYNN SMITH, Lynn Smith is a Times staff writer. She recently completed a series on community building
It was only last year that pundits were poking fun at Hillary Rodham Clinton, pictured on the dust jacket of her hasty, ghosted book "It Takes A Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us" in Good Housekeeping-esque hairdo, pastel suit and pearls. The left called her a "village idiot" (The Nation) dispensing "campaign theater." The right, full of its own theatrical indignation (Bob Dole), proclaimed that it takes a family, not a village.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
This 1995 film was written, directed by and starred 26-year-old Edward Burns (pictured) on less than a $25,000 budget. The vagaries of the heart is what "Brothers" is about, as well as the related questions of commitment, fidelity and the demands and benefits of family. Burns' native wit keeps things loose and natural, as does the pleasure at being exposed to an unexplored setting for romance. Maxine Bahns (pictured) also stars (HBO early Saturday at 5:05 a.m.).
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They were an odd couple. When Gertrude Stein met Thornton Wilder during her U.S. lecture tour in 1934, she was 60, yet a newcomer to public acclaim. Wilder, at 37, chafed at the demands of celebrity but had grown adept at handling the business aspects of authorship since the success of his Pulitzer Prize-winning 1927 novel, "The Bridge of San Luis Rey." Stein, for 30 years a resident of France, had influenced a generation of expatriate American writers, including Ernest Hemingway.
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They were an odd couple. When Gertrude Stein met Thornton Wilder during her U.S. lecture tour in 1934, she was 60, yet a newcomer to public acclaim. Wilder, at 37, chafed at the demands of celebrity but had grown adept at handling the business aspects of authorship since the success of his Pulitzer Prize-winning 1927 novel, "The Bridge of San Luis Rey." Stein, for 30 years a resident of France, had influenced a generation of expatriate American writers, including Ernest Hemingway.
BOOKS
November 16, 1997 | LYNN SMITH, Lynn Smith is a Times staff writer. She recently completed a series on community building
It was only last year that pundits were poking fun at Hillary Rodham Clinton, pictured on the dust jacket of her hasty, ghosted book "It Takes A Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us" in Good Housekeeping-esque hairdo, pastel suit and pearls. The left called her a "village idiot" (The Nation) dispensing "campaign theater." The right, full of its own theatrical indignation (Bob Dole), proclaimed that it takes a family, not a village.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
You can only be young, unknown and suddenly hot once in a lifetime, and that moment came for Edward Burns when his refreshing "The Brothers McMullen" won the Grand Jury Prize at the 1995 Sundance Film Festival. Written, directed by and starring Burns, "McMullen" went on to deserved popularity, with a cost-to-profits ratio that Variety called the year's best. So when it came to his second film, Burns not surprisingly ended up reshuffling the same ingredients one more time.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Elaine Dutka
First-time director Edward Burns, 27, was thrust into the spotlight when "The Brothers McMullen," the New York-based comedy he wrote, co-produced and starred in, took the top prize at the 1995 Sundance Film Festival. Filmed on weekends for $25,000, the character-driven movie showcased Burns' storytelling instincts and keen ear for dialogue. Picked up by 20th Century Fox's Searchlight division, the film went on to gross more than $10 million. This summer, Searchlight will release his next movie, a $3.5-million romantic comedy called "She's the One," that he also directed, wrote, produced and starred in. Burns' third project, "Krackers," will get underway in the fall.
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