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Edward Charles Allaway

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
As the prosecution began presenting its case Monday in the hearing of Edward Charles Allaway, a nurse testified that she saw the mass killer become highly agitated while he watched a horror movie at a state mental hospital. Allaway, who killed seven people at Cal State Fullerton in 1976, is seeking release, saying his mental illness is in remission. But nurse Marilyn Luther testified that Allaway became angry and unglued while watching "Night of the Living Dead" in 1999.
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NEWS
January 20, 2002
Re "Allaway Was Agitated by Movie, Nurse Testifies," Dec. 11: Did I really read that a nurse claimed that Edward Charles Allaway became "angry and unglued" when he watched "Night of the Living Dead" in 1999? Who is picking the movies for mass murderers who plead insanity? I think I'm a relatively sane guy, but "Night of the Living Dead" freaked me out. What must have Allaway thought? Shouldn't any movie involving murder and/or eating people be banned from mental hospitals? Do we need a government committee to study this?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1985 | Amalia Duarte \f7
Mass murderer Edward Charles Allaway, who shot nine people in the library at Cal State Fullerton in 1976, killing seven, will ask to be moved from a maximum-security state hospital to less restrictive custody. A decision on Allaway's request, scheduled before Judge William Thomson on Friday in Orange County Superior Court, was postponed until Dec. 20 to allow attorneys and the judge to conduct more research on the case, the court clerk said.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lenore Alvillar-Aguilar marched into the Cal State Fullerton library an eager freshman, the first in her family to attend college. She emerged an hour later trembling and crying, a witness to one of the worst mass shootings in California history. Seven people died and two were wounded in the 1976 rampage by a university janitor named Edward Charles Allaway. Alvillar-Aguilar and dozens of others got out of the white concrete building without a scratch. But that does not mean they were unscathed.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Edward Charles Allaway, a janitor who killed seven people in a 1976 shooting rampage at Cal State Fullerton, is too dangerous to be released from a state mental hospital, an Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Friday. "I believe that the defendant is a danger to himself and others at this time," said Judge Donald A. McCartin in denying Allaway's petition to be placed in an outpatient therapy program, the first step toward freedom. Despite his ruling, McCartin offered Allaway hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1995 | LILY DIZON
A Cal State Fullerton janitor who went on a shooting rampage in 1976, killing seven in Orange County's worst mass slaying, must remain institutionalized, a judge ruled Friday. Edward Charles Allaway, who was found not guilty of the killings by reason of insanity, lost his petition for release when Superior Court Judge Eileen C. Moore ruled that he did not prove he no longer poses a threat to the community.
OPINION
December 28, 2001
Re "Mass Killer's Bid for Release Is Denied," Dec. 22: During his trial, Edward Charles Allaway, who murdered seven people 25 years ago at the Cal State Fullerton library, testified that he thought that his victims would support his release. This in itself is a delusion, as it further reflects a disordered thinking process, which is the essence of schizophrenia. The best way to infer what his victims would support is to assess what their living relatives would do--send him back to the state hospital where he can be medicated with psychotropic drugs and be subject to structured living for the remainder of his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mass murderer Edward Charles Allaway says he has recovered completely from schizophrenia and is ready to live a normal life. If so, mental health experts said, he is a rare exception. The vast majority of schizophrenia patients endure the condition throughout their lives. It's a mental illness marked by a withdrawal from reality, illogical patterns of thinking and delusions. It has no known cause and no known cure, and in extreme cases has provoked sufferers to sudden, deadly violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2001
I read with the great interest and concern Dana Parsons' column ("When It Comes to Freeing Allaway, There's No Margin for Error," Aug. 1) concerning the potential release of Orange County's worst mass murderer, Edward Charles Allaway. Parsons reminds us that Allaway is "a real person," not just a "symbol" of a mentally ill person. What is painstakingly missing is the fact that most mentally ill people don't kill or harm others. Allaway, while found not guilty by reason of insanity by a judge, is a mentally ill person who shot and killed seven "real people" and injured two others.
NEWS
January 20, 2002
Re "Allaway Was Agitated by Movie, Nurse Testifies," Dec. 11: Did I really read that a nurse claimed that Edward Charles Allaway became "angry and unglued" when he watched "Night of the Living Dead" in 1999? Who is picking the movies for mass murderers who plead insanity? I think I'm a relatively sane guy, but "Night of the Living Dead" freaked me out. What must have Allaway thought? Shouldn't any movie involving murder and/or eating people be banned from mental hospitals? Do we need a government committee to study this?
OPINION
December 28, 2001
Re "Mass Killer's Bid for Release Is Denied," Dec. 22: During his trial, Edward Charles Allaway, who murdered seven people 25 years ago at the Cal State Fullerton library, testified that he thought that his victims would support his release. This in itself is a delusion, as it further reflects a disordered thinking process, which is the essence of schizophrenia. The best way to infer what his victims would support is to assess what their living relatives would do--send him back to the state hospital where he can be medicated with psychotropic drugs and be subject to structured living for the remainder of his life.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County officials must identify a building where infected patients could be isolated and treated in the event of a smallpox outbreak. Additionally, a cadre of doctors, nurses, police officers and firefighters should attempt to get smallpox inoculations in advance so they can safely attend to the sick. Those are some of the findings from a mock bioterrorism emergency conducted this week in Thousand Oaks. The four-hour exercise was held with the Ventura County Board of Supervisors in attendance to bring its members up to date on the county's readiness for terrorist incidents in the wake of Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward Charles Allaway, the disgruntled janitor who murdered seven people a quarter-century ago at the Cal State Fullerton library, is still a danger to society and should not be freed from a psychiatric hospital, an Orange County judge ruled Friday. The decision by Superior Court Judge Frank F. Fasel concluded Allaway's most serious bid yet to gain freedom. Several psychiatrists testified that Allaway would not pose a risk if released under state supervision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
As the prosecution began presenting its case Monday in the hearing of Edward Charles Allaway, a nurse testified that she saw the mass killer become highly agitated while he watched a horror movie at a state mental hospital. Allaway, who killed seven people at Cal State Fullerton in 1976, is seeking release, saying his mental illness is in remission. But nurse Marilyn Luther testified that Allaway became angry and unglued while watching "Night of the Living Dead" in 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mass murderer Edward Charles Allaway says he has recovered completely from schizophrenia and is ready to live a normal life. If so, mental health experts say, he is a rare exception. The vast majority of schizophrenics endure the condition throughout their lives. Schizophrenia is a mental illness marked by a withdrawal from reality, illogical patterns of thinking and delusions. It has no known cause and no known cure--and in extreme cases has provoked sufferers to sudden deadly violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mass murderer Edward Charles Allaway says he has recovered completely from schizophrenia and is ready to live a normal life. If so, mental health experts said, he is a rare exception. The vast majority of schizophrenia patients endure the condition throughout their lives. It's a mental illness marked by a withdrawal from reality, illogical patterns of thinking and delusions. It has no known cause and no known cure, and in extreme cases has provoked sufferers to sudden, deadly violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1992 | MATT LAIT
Edward Charles Allaway, who killed seven people in a 1976 shooting rampage at Cal State Fullerton, is too dangerous to be released from a state mental hospital, an Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Friday. "I believe that the defendant is a danger to himself and others at this time," said Judge Donald A. McCartin in denying Allaway's petition to be placed in an outpatient therapy program, the first step toward freedom. Despite his ruling, McCartin offered Allaway hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Cal State Fullerton janitor who went berserk in 1976, shooting nine people and killing seven in Orange County's worst mass slaying, has been returned to the state's maximum-security mental hospital, officials said Wednesday. Edward Charles Allaway, 54, was sent back to Atascadero State Hospital after an evaluation found he was not an "appropriate candidate" for treatment at Napa State Hospital, a lower-security facility for individuals making the transfer back into society, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking publicly for the first time about the seven people he killed, former Cal State Fullerton janitor Edward Charles Allaway said Wednesday that delusions led him to believe he was one of the victims--not the killer. Even as seven people lay dead and two wounded at the campus library in 1976, Allaway thought he was calling police to report that he had been assaulted when he actually was confessing, he testified in a Santa Ana courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter-century after he killed seven people in a shooting at Cal State Fullerton, Edward Charles Allaway told a judge Tuesday that he is cured of mental illness and should be released from a state mental hospital. "I'm not a danger to myself or others," said Allaway, the janitor who committed Orange County's deadliest act of violence on a July morning in 1976. "The last thing I want to do is hurt anybody."
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