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Edward Corser

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2004
Edward Corser, a former assistant city administrative officer in Los Angeles, will become Orange County's new chief financial officer on May 17. Corser was appointed Tuesday by James D. Ruth, county executive officer, to replace Fred Branca, who is retiring. With more than 35 years' experience, Corser was most recently finance director for Riverside County. He led the county's long-range financial planning efforts, prepared and administered the county budget, and managed government debt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2005 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County retirement board said Monday it would give a consultant a month to review findings that the long-term funding of pensions for county workers was short about $2.3 billion -- almost twice the shortfall previously estimated. County officials said that if the financial assumptions in a report released Friday were confirmed, the county would have to increase its employee pension contributions more than 50%, to $300 million a year from $190 million, starting July 1, 2006.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | MARY MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Budget tightening last year and a slowly improving economy have paid off for most Westside cities, where residents are expected to be spared from cuts in services and personnel--at least until June 30, the end of the fiscal year. Two cities are showing shortfalls--Culver City and Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989 | RICH CONNELL and TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writers
A day after backing off from a leading role in the investigation of Mayor Tom Bradley, Los Angeles City Council members Wednesday showed no reluctance to point fingers at the city treasurer, other officials and themselves for not correcting irregularities in city investment practices identified three years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one year ago that Mayor Tom Bradley ordered a sweeping management audit of the Los Angeles Police Department. Since then, the nation was shocked by the police beating of motorist Rodney G. King, the Christopher Commission was created and went on to complete its landmark study of police reforms, Police Chief Daryl F. Gates agreed to resign and a search began for his successor.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major concessionaire at Los Angeles International Airport has paid Bishop H. H. Brookins about $300,000 in lobbying fees through a controversial city program intended to help disadvantaged minorities and women, Brookins said in an interview. Brookins told The Times that Host International Inc. placed him in its minority business enterprise program to pay for lobbying during the firm's unsuccessful 1986 bid to run airport gift shops.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last seven years, Bishop H. H. Brookins and a group of influential black community leaders have owned a lucrative share of a city-awarded cable television franchise while having virtually no involvement or investment in the business, The Times has learned. The cable contract for South-Central Los Angeles, approved by the City Council and Mayor Tom Bradley in 1983, is being challenged in a long-standing federal court suit by three black businessmen.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
When a 42-year-old Chatsworth woman suffered a heart attack several months ago, her family repeatedly dialed 911 to report life-threatening symptoms that emergency experts say should have immediately triggered red lights and sirens. But instead of summoning an ambulance, dispatchers took various stabs at diagnosing her problem as the flu, food poisoning, or an anxiety attack. Medical treatment consisted of advice to breathe into a paper bag or to go see a doctor on her own.
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