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Edward De Vere

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Anonymous" — starring a sizable swath of Britain's resident acting class — is an ambitiously biting (gnawing?) literary whodunit turning on the Shakespeare question. As in, who really wrote all those seminal plays and sonnets, a long-running scholarly debate that (unlike the actual author) apparently will never die. That might sound like costume drama taken to deadly boring academic extremes. But surprisingly, in director Roland Emmerich's usually effects-heavy hands ("Independence Day," "The Day After Tomorrow" and oh so many more)
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Anonymous" — starring a sizable swath of Britain's resident acting class — is an ambitiously biting (gnawing?) literary whodunit turning on the Shakespeare question. As in, who really wrote all those seminal plays and sonnets, a long-running scholarly debate that (unlike the actual author) apparently will never die. That might sound like costume drama taken to deadly boring academic extremes. But surprisingly, in director Roland Emmerich's usually effects-heavy hands ("Independence Day," "The Day After Tomorrow" and oh so many more)
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BOOKS
March 7, 1993
On Charles Champlin's Championship of Edward De Vere as Shakespeare (with apologies to Ben Jonson): How can a man who knows small Greek and fewer Latin roots and thinks the difference between litigious and "litiginous" is moot claim Shakespeare's works for Edward de Vere? There's little truth and still less verity here. Reporting on some Top 100 list he makes his nobby once again a fist to blacken William Shakespeare's eye. Chuck, use the SpellCheck next time you belie the bard in print--he coined our tongue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1993
In response to "Happy Birthday, Dear William," by Jenijoy La Belle, Commentary, April 21: Softly now, Jenijoy and all the rest of you cocktail party intellectuals, armed with your "deathblow" facts--not one of which was mentioned in your article--let me suggest that rather than continue to perpetuate this enormous hoax, that you begin your true education concerning this "authorship question" by the acquisition of Charlton Ogburn's massive, brilliant...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1993
In response to "Happy Birthday, Dear William," by Jenijoy La Belle, Commentary, April 21: Softly now, Jenijoy and all the rest of you cocktail party intellectuals, armed with your "deathblow" facts--not one of which was mentioned in your article--let me suggest that rather than continue to perpetuate this enormous hoax, that you begin your true education concerning this "authorship question" by the acquisition of Charlton Ogburn's massive, brilliant...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1990 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Put a bunch of partisans in the great debate about who really wrote the works of William Shakespeare in a room with a couple of know-it-all computer experts and you're liable to have a disagreement on your hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Friends, Romans and countrymen: You can rest easy tonight, because three British judges ruled Saturday that William Shakespeare was indeed the fellow who wrote all those plays in Elizabethan England. The creator of Hamlet, Lear, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet was certainly not Shakespeare's contemporary, Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, according to the three law lords.
NEWS
September 5, 2001
Samson a sociopath? Bach a plagiarizing trickster? Shakespeare a literary fraud and dupe for Edward de Vere? While I couldn't help but be thoroughly impressed by Tony Perry's piece ("A Doctor by Day and Detective in Spare Time," Aug. 27) on the amazingly prolific Dr. Eric Altschuler, I must admit to a certain skepticism as well. While there can be no doubt as to Altschuler's infinite credentials and qualifications, one cannot help but question the confidence and ease with which he so readily assigns such modern maladies to such historical personages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1987
In 1623, seven years after William Shakespeare was buried in the parish church of Stratford-on-Avon, actors John Heminge and Henry Condell published a collection of his plays that came to be known as the First Folio. Their purpose, as they wrote in words that are significant to our story, was "only to keep the memory of so worthy a friend and fellow alive as was our Shakespeare . . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In the nicest way, Amy Freed's sparkling new comedy "The Beard of Avon" is the "JFK" of its chosen milieu: Elizabethan England in the time of William Shakespeare. Freed answers her central question--"Who wrote Shakespeare's plays?"--by opening an overstuffed rucksack of conspiracy theories.
BOOKS
March 7, 1993
On Charles Champlin's Championship of Edward De Vere as Shakespeare (with apologies to Ben Jonson): How can a man who knows small Greek and fewer Latin roots and thinks the difference between litigious and "litiginous" is moot claim Shakespeare's works for Edward de Vere? There's little truth and still less verity here. Reporting on some Top 100 list he makes his nobby once again a fist to blacken William Shakespeare's eye. Chuck, use the SpellCheck next time you belie the bard in print--he coined our tongue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1990 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Put a bunch of partisans in the great debate about who really wrote the works of William Shakespeare in a room with a couple of know-it-all computer experts and you're liable to have a disagreement on your hands.
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