Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEdward Dmytryk
IN THE NEWS

Edward Dmytryk

TRAVEL
October 29, 1995 | MARY FRANCES SMITH
SAN LUIS OBISPO--Reel entertainment awaits at the third annual San Luis Obispo International Film Festival, Nov. 2-5. It features American director Edward Dmytryk; a salute to art directors, with discussions and screenings; an evening with actor Noah Wyle, and more. New films to be screened include: "Dear Babe"; "The Maestro"; and "Sworn to the Drum." Individual tickets: $5-$25. Full-event pass: $65. Events held in the Fremont Theater, Downtown Centre Cinemas and the Palm Theatre.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ben Barzman, who was forced to abandon a successful screenwriting career when he was placed on a McCarthy-era blacklist, died Friday in Santa Monica. He was 79 and had suffered a stroke. A journalist, novelist and author of musical revues, he turned to screenwriting with "True to Life" in 1943.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Nuart's two-week Pulp Noir series begins Friday with a dynamite Raymond Chandler double feature, "The Big Sleep" (1946) and "Murder, My Sweet" (1944). There's a famous Hollywood anecdote about how director Howard Hawks and writers William Faulkner, Jules Furthman and Leigh Brackett couldn't figure out whodunit and Chandler proved no help.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | RAY LOYND
Movie historians and Hollywood documentary buffs will not want to miss the life story of RKO Pictures, an estimable six-part BBC series that kicks off tonight in "Hollywood: The Golden Years" (KCET Channel 28 at 10 p.m.). Each hourlong program (previously shown on cable) makes an incisive thematic point through clips and reminiscences with survivors, including some who have died since they were interviewed, about the studio's history and its impact.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | KENDAL PATTERSON
Long before "Fatal Attraction" came along to scare the bejabbers out of any man contemplating infidelity, there was 1949's "The Hidden Room" (later retitled "Obsession"). It's the story of a methodical British psychiatrist (played by Robert Newton) who has had enough of his attractive young wife's dallying and decides to do away with the next man she befriends. That unlucky young man is a jaunty American named Bill Kronin (Phil Brown), who soon comes to wish he weren't so irresistible to women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Gerstad, Academy Award-winning film editor for the 1949 prizefighting classic "Champion" starring Kirk Douglas and the 1952 Western epic "High Noon" starring Gary Cooper, has died. He was 93. Gerstad, whose Hollywood career spanned more than four decades, died July 17 of natural causes in Palm Springs, where he had lived in retirement since 1973. In addition to his Oscars, Gerstad shared with film editor Fred Berger the American Cinema Editors Career Achievements Awards in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2004 | Associated Press
Horizontal and vertical bars come and go, evoking the mania of Norman Bates as the opening credits roll in "Psycho." A mass of Las Vegas neon whirls as the body of Robert De Niro falls at the beginning of "Casino." Such was the genius of Saul Bass, the American graphic designer who specialized in movie title sequences and worked with Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scorsese, Otto Preminger, Stanley Kubrick and others to capture the essence of their most memorable films -- without giving the plots away.
NEWS
May 17, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
BEN BURTT, the Oscar-winning "Star Wars" sound designer who gave Chewbacca his distinctive bellows and snorts and R2D2 its endearing trills, toots and whistles, is a host of this evening's "The Sound Behind the Image" presentation by the film academy's Science and Technology Council. Burtt will be joined by Oscar-nominated sound mixer Kevin O'Connell for the celebration of the art of sound in action-adventure films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bernard Vorhaus, whose Hollywood career as a prolific B-movie director was cut short by anti-Communist blacklisting in the 1950s, but whose quickie British films of the 1930s have recently achieved a renewed following, has died. He was believed to be 95. Vorhaus, who directed some of the earliest films featuring Ida Lupino and John Mills, died Nov. 23 in London, where he had lived since 1951.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|