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Edward Duke

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NEWS
January 20, 1994
Edward Duke, 40, British actor known for his solo show "Jeeves Takes Charge." The son of a diplomat, Duke completed his expulsion-riddled schooling in Japan and then went into theater--beginning in the box office--determined to become an actor. He hit his stride in 1978 when he took on the persona of young Bertie Wooster, master of P.G. Wodehouse's perfect valet, Jeeves.
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NEWS
January 20, 1994
Edward Duke, 40, British actor known for his solo show "Jeeves Takes Charge." The son of a diplomat, Duke completed his expulsion-riddled schooling in Japan and then went into theater--beginning in the box office--determined to become an actor. He hit his stride in 1978 when he took on the persona of young Bertie Wooster, master of P.G. Wodehouse's perfect valet, Jeeves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
It has been 10 years since Edward Duke became the eternal upper-class twit Bertie Wooster (think of Charlie Brown as a British aristocrat), Bertie's doughty and demanding Aunts Agatha and Dahlia ("totally unfit for human consumption") and, of course the incomparable Jeeves, the gentleman's gentleman who manages Bertie, living in dread that his charge will humiliate him by wearing a checked suit, in the one-man, 12-character show "Jeeves Takes Charge."
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Early returns Saturday night gave former Democratic Gov. Edwin W. Edwards the lead over former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke in Louisiana's turbulent and historic gubernatorial race. With 18% of the precincts reporting shortly after the polls closed at 6 p.m. PST, Edwards, a three-time former governor, led Duke, a Republican state representative, by 59% to 41%. All the major television networks projected Edwards as the winner, based on exit polls.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1985
Regarding Dan Sullivan's review of "Jeeves Takes Charge," a tour de force by Edward Duke from the work of P.G. Wodehouse (" 'Jeeves': Not Quite in Full Charge," Sept. 21): Bertie Wooster would say that "what the world needs is fewer and better drama critics since many of them are fat-headed chumps who consist of nothing but muscle from the neck up and are always talking through the backs of their heads." I don't know what Sullivan's problem is. Perhaps, like Bertie's Aunt Agatha, he wears barbed wire next to the skin and that causes him to be irritable and petty.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democrat Edwin W. Edwards crushed former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke on Saturday to win a Louisiana governor's election keenly watched around the nation as a referendum on race relations and voter discontent. With 99% of the precincts reporting, Edwards, a three-time former governor, defeated Duke, a Republican state representative, by 61% to 39%. The vote totals were Edwards 1,061,233, Duke 681,278. More than 78% of Louisiana's 2.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Early returns Saturday night gave former Democratic Gov. Edwin W. Edwards the lead over former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke in Louisiana's turbulent and historic gubernatorial race. With 18% of the precincts reporting shortly after the polls closed at 6 p.m. PST, Edwards, a three-time former governor, led Duke, a Republican state representative, by 59% to 41%. All the major television networks projected Edwards as the winner, based on exit polls.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democrat Edwin W. Edwards crushed former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke on Saturday to win a Louisiana governor's election keenly watched around the nation as a referendum on race relations and voter discontent. With 99% of the precincts reporting, Edwards, a three-time former governor, defeated Duke, a Republican state representative, by 61% to 39%. The vote totals were Edwards 1,061,233, Duke 681,278. More than 78% of Louisiana's 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
It has been 10 years since Edward Duke became the eternal upper-class twit Bertie Wooster (think of Charlie Brown as a British aristocrat), Bertie's doughty and demanding Aunts Agatha and Dahlia ("totally unfit for human consumption") and, of course the incomparable Jeeves, the gentleman's gentleman who manages Bertie, living in dread that his charge will humiliate him by wearing a checked suit, in the one-man, 12-character show "Jeeves Takes Charge."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1985
Regarding Dan Sullivan's review of "Jeeves Takes Charge," a tour de force by Edward Duke from the work of P.G. Wodehouse (" 'Jeeves': Not Quite in Full Charge," Sept. 21): Bertie Wooster would say that "what the world needs is fewer and better drama critics since many of them are fat-headed chumps who consist of nothing but muscle from the neck up and are always talking through the backs of their heads." I don't know what Sullivan's problem is. Perhaps, like Bertie's Aunt Agatha, he wears barbed wire next to the skin and that causes him to be irritable and petty.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
Some people say that impending nuclear war is the issue of the 20th Century. For P. G. Wodehouse, who wrote from 1901 until his death at 93 in 1975, the real issues are: --Will Bertram Wooster's aunt really deny him the food of her chef, Anatole ("God's gift to gastronomic juices"), if Bertie refuses to tap-dance and sing "Sonny Boy" in public?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
An evening with Bertie Wooster seemed just the thing to lighten the strain, so we toddled round to the Westwood Playhouse on Wednesday to see Edward Duke in "Jeeves Takes Charge." He seemed--striking the tactful note--somewhat off his feed. You know yourself how hard it is to be a good host just after you've just had an argument with a near-and-dear, or just blown the family fortune, or otherwise landed in the soup. The spirit is willing, but the old bean isn't working properly.
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